No Wasted Ink Writer’s Links

This week’s writer’s links are more focused on writing, novels and publishing. I hope you enjoy them!



20 Principles of Good Writing

The Shakespearean Guide to Entrepreneurship

Social media and the art of being interested

Why Aren’t E-Reading Devices Smarter?

How Much Should You Pay To Publish Your Novel?

Working Through Illness

20 Synonyms for “Type”

Are You Charging Accordingly For Your Freelance Writing Skills?

The Impulsive Writer’s Productivity Secret: 3 Reasons to Write What You Want

21 Ways to Add Magic to Your Brand and Stand Out as a Creative

Writing Space: Cyndi Lavin

I credit Problogger Cyndi Lavin as being the one who returned me to writing on a regular basis. Due to her encouragement, I started to publish guest posts on blogs, including her own, and various articles to online jewelry magazines. I am proud to feature her writing space here on No Wasted Ink.

I don’t really remember there ever being a time when I wasn’t making something, even if it was just making a mess as a small child! I credit my mother, RuthAnn Lavin, with encouraging and modeling everyday creativity for me. I was always making, and sometimes selling, small things as a child, but I discovered along the way that what I really like most is helping other people figure stuff out too. Creativity has too narrow a definition in some peoples’ worlds, and I really believe that if you find the form of creativity that you were designed by your Creator to express, you’ll be a much happier person.

To that end, I began writing up instructions for projects that were published in various magazines and books, and then I got involved in blogging back in 2005. My blogs quickly became a way that I found to share art projects with people who were actually interested in learning to do some of the things I do.

When people ask me what I do for a living, my standard reply is, “I make things and I write about it.” If they show interest, then I elaborate, but it still strikes me that is the best description of my work day. I have a wonderful studio which includes space for both my work table and my writing desk. While the work table is most often chaotic and messy, my writing space is pretty neat and organized. Yes, there are a few piles, but they are kept to a minimum. I like being able to move quickly from my work table, where I also shoot most of my pictures, over to my writing desk where I keep my projects organized for future publication.

My favorite making/writing project to date has been my e-book, Every Bead Has a Story, which is about my explorations in mixed media bead embroidery. I published it a chapter at a time, both because I was too excited to wait and also so that readers could acquire only the chapters that interested them. The first chapter is free, so if any of your readers would like to take up a new hobby, they are welcome to help themselves.

Cyndi Lavin, Artist & AuthorCyndi Lavin

http://www.beading-arts.com/
http://www.mixed-media-artist.com/
http://realfoodfast.blogspot.com/

No Wasted Ink Writer’s Links

I am more focused on the act of writing in my links for this week. How to research a novel, archetypes of novels and how to define the category you novel might be published in. I hope you’ll find it as useful as I did in my process of learning about and following the treads in publishing here on No Wasted Ink.


Epic Fantasy: Archetypes & Window Dressing

My Principles that will become like the snowflake

Editing the Novel

How I Did Research For 3 New York Times Bestselling Authors

Defining the Category of Your Novel in the New Age of Publishing

Contractor Tips: Three Tips for Success on Elance

5 Writing Rules I Broke to Get Unstuck

50 Things I Learned At Thrillerfest 2012

6 Proven Tips For Getting Into The Write Mood

Writing for Profit or Pleasure – Magazines & eZines

Author Interview: Bobbi A. Chukran

I first met Bobbi A. Chukran over fifteen years ago as a fellow member of an online think tank for artisans learning to market themselves on the internet. This was back before there was a facebook, a myspace or even before the world wide web was generally established. (Okay. Now I’m feeling old!) We all worked in different mediums from writing, to painting, to making handmade jewelry. I credit this group for making me a successful artist and launching my art business. I’ve watched Bobbi grow as an artist down through the years: as a gardener, a painter, an author and everything in between. I was proud for her when her first play won an award and went on to be performed by students in various high schools here in America. Now it is my honor and pleasure to introduce Bobbi and her newly launched book here on No Wasted Ink.

author bobbie a chukranMy name is Bobbi A. Chukran, although I recently published a mystery novel under the name B.A. Neal. I thought using a pseudonym would make it easier for me to branch out into different genres. I’m the author of LONE STAR DEATH, a new historical mystery novel, an award-winning playwright and an author of previous non-fiction books and magazine articles. Right now I’m focusing on the novel and short story writing.

When and why did you begin writing?

I always enjoyed writing in school, and was encouraged by my teachers to do more of it. I remember finding an old copy of The Writer magazine when I was in middle school, and entering a poetry-writing contest. I wrote a lot of poetry back then, most of which was dreck. I didn’t win the award, but it was the first time I came to the realization that writing was something that people got paid for and did as a job.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Probably when a high school teacher told me I was good and that I should pursue it. I wrote for the school newspaper and wrote little stories at home, but also considered myself an artist. My first article was published in a craft magazine back in 1976. I guess that’s when I first thought about doing more writing. I wrote non-fiction for years under the name Bobbi A. McRae, then decided to try my hand at fiction.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

It’s a historical mystery, set in 1880s central Texas. It features a feisty, headstrong young woman, Samantha Slater, who is 19 years old. She comes to town for a job as a typewriter operator, but ends up in the middle of a murder mystery that she can’t resist investigating. In the process, she gets into a lot of danger of her own, and learns a lot about herself.

What inspired you to write this book?

I had almost finished several romantic suspense novels and a contemporary mystery when the Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman show came on TV. I was fascinated by the costumes, characters, small town, and decided to start a whole new book set during that time period, except in Texas. I researched it for a year, learned about a lot of the real people and events going on at that time, and eventually came up with a few characters. I had always been a fan of westerns, and it seems that there was always one on TV in our house, so I guess it’s no surprise how the book turned out.

Do you have a specific writing style?

I tend to write a lot of dialogue, since I also write plays. I start with a few characters talking to each other and before long, they take off. I do preliminary planning, a rough plot, but it always changes.

Can you tell us more about the plays you write?

In addition to writing short stories, I also write the plays for young people. They seem more like “me” than anything else I write. They are silly, use puns and plays-on-words and feature quirky characters. They are inspired by classic tales, but with a twist. My goal is to turn those into books for young readers. Unfortunately, writing plays is a long, hard road because in order to get anywhere, you must first have a production. Only then can you seek publication (unless you publish it yourself). Once it’s published, it’s liable to get more productions through schools, churches, etc.

December 2011 I published one of my plays, THE JOURNAL OF MINA HARKER, a comedy spoof of the classic DRACULA story, as an e-script for the Kindle. Getting people to read plays is a hard sell, but I’m glad I did it because it got my feet wet with publishing e-books.

How did you come up with the title of your novel?

I started out with LONE STAR STATE OF DEATH, because the titles of many of the mysteries at the time were based on puns. When I extensively revised the book and republished it in May 2012, I shortened the title to LONE STAR DEATH.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

First of all, I just want it to be a fun reading experience, a little escape from everyday life. Secondly, a theme emerged that I didn’t plan–that our family is not necessarily those we’re related to by blood.

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Not really–it’s mostly fantasy.

What authors have most influenced your life?

With mysteries, it’s hard to say. I read a lot of Barbara Michaels’ books when I first started and I love the way she combined everyday stuff with fantasy stuff. Her newer books are much different. I love the sparse style of Robert B. Parker. I read a lot of books, all over the genres. Right now I’m obsessed with reading older short story collections, because I’m convinced I’m a better short story/novella writer than a long novel person. My next books will be novelizations of my fantasy/comedy plays. I’m excited about them, because they are a more cohesive collection than my other writing.

If you had to choose, is there a writer would you consider a mentor?

Not really. I’ve taken some good workshops from good authors, but basically am self-taught.

Who designed the cover of your book?

I did. I used the photo that was on the cover of the previous edition and redesigned it for this one. I bought rights to all the artwork, so it was easy to do. It helps that I have years and years of experience as a graphics designer, printshop experience, desktop publishing experience and an art degree. Those were my “real jobs” for many years. The Kindle cover and the printed cover are a bit different. I used the same photo on both, but the overall design is different.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

It takes a long time to get anywhere with writing. Don’t wait. Sit down and write. I’m developing a new product I call BUTT GLUE. You apply it, then sit down. Just kidding, but it is something we all need. Take a lot of notes, start with a short story or flash fiction story first. Those will boost your confidence. Don’t be afraid to write strange things. It took me years before I would “let myself loose” with my writing, and I’m still learning. If you like fantasy or science fiction, then write that! Don’t try to write a mystery just because you think they’ll sell. Your heart won’t be in it otherwise.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Just, have fun with the book–don’t judge it too harshly because it’s just a story!

Lone Star Death Book CoverBobbi A. Chukran
Taylor, Texas
LONE STAR DEATH
Limestone Ledge Publishing
Cover artist: Bobbi A. Chukran
BLOG
AMAZON
BARNES & NOBLE
CREATESPACE
Authorstream

No Wasted Ink Writer’s Links

Another wonderful Monday is upon us. It is time to visit lots of links related to the art and business of writing here at No Wasted Ink.


Five Winning Habits of Successful Writers

Rights vs. Copyright

What Writers Should Do When Drawing A Blank

The Rise and Fall of the Rocket Ebook

The Beat of Your Own Drum

The 4 iconic types of freelancers

How to Start a Publishing Company

Amazon’s ambitious new push for same-day delivery

Write Faster with Scrivener

5 Stupid Things You Do in Social Media That Brand You a Pariah