Category Archives: Author Interviews

Author Interview: Matthew Pallamary

I asked Matt to give a short description of himself and he replied: “Author, Editor, Shamanic Explorer.” No Wasted Ink is honored to feature this writing instructor and author for your consideration.

Author Matthew PallamaryMy name is Matt Pallamary, a perspiring writer who has been teaching a Phantastic Fiction Workshop for the past 25 years at the Santa Barbara Writer’s Conference, The Southern California Writer’s Conference and many others.

When and why did you begin writing?

As far as dramatic writing and storytelling goes, I had a good friend killed on his motorcycle around 1982 or 1983, which prompted me to write a novel about a guy who gets killed on his motorcycle and wakes up outside his body caught up with dark forces in the spirit world.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I have always loved words and language. I won first place in the school spelling Bee in the 6th grade and went on to a citywide spelling Bee. English was my favorite subject in high school and my writing caught the attention of my college creative writing teachers.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

DreamLand was written with legendary DJ Ken Reeth, who left the planet on May 9th 2005.

Fueled by breakthroughs in technology and neuroscience, the terminally ill, while in an induced slumber, in a pain-free, medically supervised environment, can literally dream their lives away in pre-programmed situations of their choosing, controlled by a super computer.

The well-meaning creators of computer generated dreaming plan to conquer the stigma of death by making its wonders available to all, so people can die in vivid, pre-programmed dream surroundings, reliving blissful moments from their past. All goes according to plan until the dream of DreamLand is shattered by the profit-seeking backer of the project.

What inspired you to write this book?

Ken and I were in writing workshops together and we became friends and fans of each other’s writing. He kept coming up with these short dream sequences that were vignettes more than stories and was wondering what to do with them. We got to talking and the next thing you know we were writing a book together.

Do you have a specific writing style?

My style is specifically my own that I consciously developed. As I tell my writing students. The brain is the canvas and the words are the strokes of the brush from a giant palette, and it must be dynamic, moving, and full of energy, making every word count. The act of reading is an act of co-creation between the writer and the reader. It is the writer’s job to paint the significant details of their story that the reader can hook into and fill in the blanks that come from their own subjective experiences and interpretations.

How did you come up with the title of this book?

It is the world where the story takes place.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Technology may seem to perform certain tasks flawlessly, but human motives and their skewed cross-purposes can bring dire consequences.

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

In a nutshell, I realized that my life was stranger than anything I could make up, so I wrote about it and the response has been gratifying. I have done extensive dream work and dream studies, so I know this territory well.

What authors have most influenced your life? What about them do you find inspiring?

I was blessed to have Ray Bradbury as a mentor. Ray kicked off the Santa Barbara Writer’s Conference for 35 years and through Sid Stebel I got to know Ray and learned much from him. Ray was not one to give out blurbs, but he blurbed my first book, a short story collection titled The Small Dark Room of the Soul saying “Bravo! More!”

My recent long overdue follow up to The Small Dark Room of the Soul, titled A Short Walk to the Other Side is dedicated to him. Ray always said, “Write for the love of it!” His opening speeches at the SBWC were epic!

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator?

I am proud to say that I designed the cover of my book and I had a lot of fun doing it.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

As a wise writer once told me: Writing = Ass in chair.

Believe in yourself and what you have to say and do it because you love it. Writing workshops and conferences are awesome proving grounds and wonderfully supportive environments to thrive in.

Dreamland Book CoverKen Reeth & Matthew J. Pallamary
San Diego, CA

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Cover Artist: Matthew J. Pallamary

Publisher: Mystic Ink Publishing

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Author Interview: Cheryllynn Dyess

When I asked CeeCee how she might describe herself, she answered: “Never forget where you have been, so you can remember where you may not want to go again.” Experiencing the unique insights and thoughts of the author is one of the reasons we read. I am glad to introduce this southern fantasy author to you here on No Wasted Ink.

Author Cheryllynn DyessI am Cheryllynn Dyess. I am a forty-two year old woman born and raised in the southeastern part of the United States, mainly Georgia and Florida. I was raised loving the outdoors and being crafty. I enjoy fishing, crafting, reading, and football. I graduated from the University of Phoenix with my BA in Healthcare Administration/Health Information Systems. I have about twenty years of healthcare experience from reception to health aide to dental assisting in oral surgery to management. I have always had a drive to take care of others.

I am a mother of four and two grand-babies. I have three fur babies. Two Chihuahua’s and one Chihuahua and one mini Australian Shepherd mix. Currently, writing is one of two occupations I have. Avon is the other. Yes, I am the Avon Lady! I have been in Avon for two years and it has been very successful for me. The earnings from Avon have paid for all the publishing and marketing costs of my books as well as many household bills. Actually, I started Avon to pay for my writing expenses and the business has grown immensely.

When and why did you begin writing?

In the mid to late 1980s, I began scribbling away thoughts and pieces of crumbs to whole dishes that are now poems. I began writing for no reason other than I felt the drive to do so. My hand met the pen and the pen met the paper, creating many pieces of work that are still on the original paper from decades ago.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Two years ago I began writing as a serious notion to be a writer, but only when I saw my first book published in my hands did I acknowledge that I was an actual writer.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

My most recently published book is Kyluna, Jein’s Journey Series Book 3. In Kyluna, Jein has been accepted as the type of woman she wants to be and now is allowing herself to accept her destiny. Accepting love and fate has always been a struggle for Jein, since meeting Rohm she has had little choice but to accept and enjoy what life has meant for her. She finally finds a land worthy of her people and is visited by…well, now you will have to read the book to learn that part.

What inspired you to write this book?

I am not sure that inspiration drove me to write this series to be honest. It’s hard to explain, I was told I should write a book because I had talent. So one day I said, “Okay I will.” I sat at the computer and Jein’s Journey started to unfold. In many ways Jein is a reflection of myself, so in that case I am my own inspiration.

Do you have a specific writing style?

When I write I typically grab an idea and start writing, editing and rewriting. I do not plan much although I do research when needed.

How did you come up with the title of this book?

Jein’s Journey was a given title when I knew it would be more than one book about Jein. Jein’s Journey is not only about where she goes to look for a home for her people but also about her journey with life.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

The underlying message in my novel is to accept who you are and to always be true to yourself no matter what. Too many times people change who they are to fit others desires and needs and this is not how we should be at any time.

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

The events are not comparable to any in my life or any others that I am aware of, but as for experience, yes. The general feeling of being an individual different than what others deemed acceptable, always struggling with being true to oneself, is in reference to me. I grew up in a home where I could not be myself and when I did, I was chided greatly for not being what I was expected to be.

What authors have most influenced your life? What about them do you find inspiring?

Writing influences most comes from Edgar Allen Poe, others include more recents like J.K.Rowling, T.M. Nielsen, Jennifer Malone Wright and N.K.Jemisin.

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator?

Kristy Charbonneau did the cover design on all my books, not just this one. I was refered to her from a fellow author and was greatly impressed with her work from my first self-published book and had to have her to repeat her magic for me.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

Advice for writers, well I would say first if you chose to write know that your work does not end at the ending page of the story. Whether you are self-published or published through an agent the work does not end with the hit of the submit button. Martketing, marketing and marketing are forever a job. I would advise that a writer take time to read about several paths that are available for editing services, cover designs, formatting professionals, publishing venues and most of all marketing. There is a lot of work to write a book but if you do not do the proper amount of work to get it in the hands of readers it was all for not.

My second huge piece of advice is to remember that you will not please all readers. If you have a style of writing and a genre you prefer then stay true to yourself and your writing.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

To all my readers and to any readers, really, remember that the author you are reading the work of has poured their souls out for the world to see openly so do them a kind favor and leave a review of that book you just read. Let us authors know how you like the work or follow us on one of our social media networks. We love to hear feedback and to have interaction with our readers. As always, I would love to say thank you to my readers for taking the time to consider my work, purchasing it and reading it.

kyluna book coverCheryllynn Dyess
Central Texas

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Author Interview: Rhett C. Bruno

Rhett Bruno is a science fiction/fantasy author who puts an emphasis on developing unique characters within their world. I’d like to welcome him to the readers of No Wasted Ink.

Author Rhett C. Bruno​I’m Rhett Bruno. I grew up on Long Island and have been writing since before I was young. Ever since I was little I to creating worlds or stories. At first it was with toys and games, then drawing, but by High School I dedicated myself entirely to writing. I just found that it was something I was better at than drawings. It has always been something I do on the side, however. During the day I practice architecture in westchester county, ever since I graduated from the Syracuse University School of Architecture.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I first considered myself I writer when I got offers ​from small presses to publish The Circuit: Executor Rising.” So only recently. I don’t think I really improved as a writer until I started reading a ton of books in order to study science fiction. It was always something I ​had to do. It calmed me and left me satisfied.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

My books is an adult science fiction novel published by Mundania Press. It is set in a grim future where the Earth has fallen and humanity now lives in contained settlements throughout our solar system (A place humans have begun to call The Circuit). Grass, trees and other animals are a rarity. The story is fast-paced, explosive, and revolves around four characters whose lives are intertwined because of the actions of Cassius Vale, the enigmatic former council member of the New Earth Tribune.

What inspired you to write this book?

My initial inspiration came from watching classic science fiction movies/shows like Star Wars and Star Trek and noticing how artificial gravity is just kind of an accepted technology. After doing some research I found out just how far-off most of the theories are and came up with the idea of us finding a new element (Gravitum) deep in the Earth that gives us the ability. When I was thinking up the story I wanted the notion that human curiosity has repercussions to be prevalent and so that was when I decided that the mining of Gravitum would be what unsettled the fragile nature of our homeworld. While that is never directly stated in this novel, it is intended to be implied. Everything else sort of evolved around that idea of Earth being a shackle that humanity is bound to even after they evolve beyond the planet’s surface.

Do you have a specific writing style?

I don’t think so. I think it’s constantly evolving. I used to focus a lot more on description, but I wanted The Circuit to move along at a brisker pace. I always hoped it would be something perfect to read during a train commute to work. Fitting since the history of the Circuit is based upon large-scale, public transportation.

How did you come up with the title of this book?

The series name has been set in stone since before I even started the first chapter. Something about The Circuit resonated with me after I decided to name the setting the Kepler Circuit (After 17th century astronomer and mathematician Johannes Kepler). Executor Rising, another of my novels, took a little longer to come up with. When I submitted the book to publishers the subtitle was Progeny of Vale, but since there are really four main character it felt unfair to have one of their names in the title. Executor is a position within the New Earth Tribune that plays a large role in the first novel. When I thought of it I immediately told my publisher to update the contract. It was so obvious that I don’t knew how I didn’t think of it sooner.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

I think there are plenty of messages about humanity sprinkled throughout the series, but I really want the readers to each have a unique experience in their reading of it. I want them to take out of it whatever they feel. I guess if I had to pick any message it would be about the dangers of curiosity; that there are repercussions for everything that is done in the name of it.

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Actually no. I tried my best to disappear into the world and craft all the characters around their own experiences.

What authors have most influenced your life? What about them do you find inspiring?

More than anyone Robert E. Howard. His Conan stories are unbelievable, and there is so much energy in his writing that it is a shame he was taken so early in his life. Other writers I hold in high esteem are Tomothy Zahn and Frank Herbert. The way they balance multiple characters and multiple perspectives is masterful. I didn’t really know if it was something that could be done effectively until I read their work.

If you had to choose, is there a writer would you consider a mentor? Why?

I guess it would be Robert E Howard. Only because his stories were the first that I really ate up. I wanted to write with the same vigor that he had, and hopefully one day I’ll get close!

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator?

Adam Day. He was a close friend at college and really is an amazing artist. I wanted to work with someone I knew to design an original cover that I could really be proud of and I trusted him to do an awesome job. Personally I think he exceeded my expectations.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

Same as you’ll see anywhere else. Keep writing. Also, make sure you get feedback from other people. It’s so easy to get lost in your own little world as you work that you forget you’re writing for other people. So you have to get opinions and read other similar work to really start to understand what the public may actually enjoy.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

I guess it would be to give my book a try and really give it an honest review. I went to Architecture School so I know how vital constructive criticism can be to get better at anything. So if you don’t like my book, and you actually read it front to back, let me know why!

The_Circuit__Executor_Rising Book CoverRhett C. Bruno
White Plains, NY

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Cover Artist: Adam T. Day
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Author Interview: Leslie Ann Moore

I’ve know Leslie for many years and I’ve been a big fan of her previous fantasy trilogy. When I learned she had a new steampunk series coming out, I asked her to come here and share more about it with us here on No Wasted Ink.

Author Leslie Ann MooreWhen my mother was pregnant with me, one of her favorite singers at the time was Leslie Uggams, which is why I’m Leslie Ann Moore. I’m a doctor of veterinary medicine by profession, but I’m a writer by passion.

When and why did you begin writing?

I’ve been blessed since childhood with a vivid imagination, and a penchant for inventing stories out of the ferment of creativity which resulted from that. At age twelve, the very first thing I ever committed to paper, and yes, back then, it had to be paper, was a poem about a horse. I showed it to my mother, who, of course, told me it was the most wonderful poem she’d ever read. Really, what else was she going to say? So, I took her at her word and submitted it to a national horse enthusiast magazine, and lo and behold, it got published!! I haven’t written much poetry since.

I didn’t do much writing at all throughout my late childhood and teen years. I was at the stage in my life where I needed to read, voraciously, in order to study and absorb how great writers did what they did. I devoured all the classics of sci-fi and fantasy, essentially training my own artistic mind in the techniques of story structure and style, against the day when I was finally ready to produce something of my own.

In high school, I created my own newspaper for a history class assignment. Rather than write a standard report on the defeat of the Spanish Armada by Elizabeth I of England and her scrappy little navy, I wrote it as a series of articles from imaginary reporters on the scene, and laid it out in newspaper format, complete with drawings I did myself in place of photos. I got an A+ on it! My mom still has that project, lovingly preserved.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

In 2001, when I began work on my first novel, Griffin’s Daughter. Until then, I really didn’t think of myself as a serious writer–I was more of a dabbler. I’d written some short stories for a creative writing class during my undergrad days, but that was it.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

A Tangle of Fates is the first installment of a new trilogy, the overall title of which is Vox Machina. Genre-wise, it’s soft sci-fi, with steampunk flavorings, a lot of politics, adventure, some mysticism, and a dash of romance. For those familiar with screenwriting terms, the log-line would be ‘Snow White as revolutionary.’ Another log-line could be ‘Snow White meets The Terminator’. Both of those should give you a good idea about the general plot. This series is very different from my Griffin’s Daughter trilogy, which was a romantic fantasy.

The book has already gotten glowing reviews from, among others, Howard Hendrix, a Hugo and Nebula Award nominee, and Emma Bull, one of the inventors of the urban fantasy genre back in the ’80’s.

What inspired you to write this book?

I wanted to write a story based on a traditional fairy tale, but turn it on its head. In so many fairy tales, the female is passive. She’s there only as a prop for the male hero to rescue. Or, if she is the center of the tale, she’s the victim of manipulative, malign forces, and still ends up needing a male savior. The Vox Machina Trilogy, of which ATOF is the first book, takes the story of Snow White and transforms it from a tale of a helpless girl needing rescue by not one, but eight (the seven dwarves, plus the Prince) men, to one of a girl rising up from the ashes of her former life to become the savior of not one, but two nations.

Do you have a specific writing style?

I’ve modeled my style after two wonderful fantasy writers–Janny Wurts, and Kate Elliot. I like to think of it as Neo Victorian. It’s a lush, complex style, full of beautiful similes and uncommon word choices. Some would call it ‘purple’ or ‘flowery’. It’s definitely not in fashion these days, particularly with American editors, critics, and other ‘gatekeepers’ of the literary world. The common wisdom is that modern readers lack the patience for long, complex sentences and lush imagery. Everything is supposed to be short and unembellished. I don’t buy that. Both Janny and Kate have vast fan bases, and continue to sell lots of books.

How did you come up with the title of this book?

My fianceé and I were having dinner at Marie Callendar’s, and we were brainstorming ideas. He pointed out how all of the character’s fates were intertwined. I imagined a big ball of string, all tangled up, thus, the title was born.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

All my books have overt political themes. The Vox Machina Trilogy deals with political repression and racial injustice, and how a small group of committed individuals can overthrow an entrenched regime. The main message is that it’s not impossible to effect radical change in a society. It just needs brave people to stand up and fight for what’s right.

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Only insofar as I’m alive in these times, and angry about the many injustices I see in our society and others around the world.

What authors have most influenced your life? What about them do you find inspiring?

James Herriott, who wrote All Creatures Great And Small, about his life as a country vet in England during the 1920‘s and 30‘s. He made the veterinary profession come alive for me and inspired me to become a vet myself. Strange, though, I didn’t read those books, thinking, hey, I can also be a writer as well as a vet. I never connected the two. I think I was too young.

Much later, in 2001, I went to the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books and attended a panel about writing fantasy fiction. Terry Brooks, the author of the best-selling Sword of Shannara series was one of the panelists. I’ve read a lot of his work. He talked about how he’d been a lawyer, and it had taken him many years to transition from full-time lawyer to full-time writer. He’d had years in between where he wrote books and practiced law. When I heard how he’d persevered until he achieved his goal of quitting law to support himself on his writings, I knew I could do the same. I’m not there yet, but soon.

There are other authors who’ve influenced my writing life. I’ve already mentioned Janny Wurts and Kate Elliott, both of whom helped me to develop my voice.

If you had to choose, is there a writer would you consider a mentor? Why?

There isn’t anyone I know personally that I can say has been a mentor, but of the many writers I admire, Janny Wurts is the closest. I study how she puts together sentences, and her breathtaking imagery, as if I’m in a master class and she’s the teacher.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

Write every day, if possible, even if it’s only a few paragraphs. Study writers you admire, learn how they do things, then emulate them. Know proper grammar, in whatever language(s) you write in. Then, when you break the rules, you’re doing it as a stylistic choice and not out of ignorance. Learn how to critically analyze other people’s criticism of your work. Everyone has an opinion, but not everyone who reads your stuff will have the necessary insight and abilities to offer useful advice. It’s OK to reject suggestions as crap, even if it’s from someone you trust. In the end, you are the boss. Write what you want to write.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Thanks for coming along on this wonderful journey with me. There are many more stories I want to share, and I hope I can bring the best of them to all of you.

MHTangleCoverLeslie Ann Moore
Los Angeles, CA

A TANGLE OF FATES

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Author Interview: A. R. Silverberry

A. R. Silverberry writes fiction for adults and children. His novel, WYNDANO’S CLOAK, won multiple awards, including the Benjamin Franklin Award gold medal for Juvenile/Young Adult Fiction. I’d like to welcome him here on No Wasted Ink.

Author Peter AdlerA day in the life of A. R. Silverberry:

Wake up between six and seven, roll out of bed, find my cat, and soak up the morning love. Place face deeply into Persian fur and listen to him purr. Pet him until it’s clear what he really wants is food. Promise to continue to fool myself this tomorrow. Clean litter box. House boss now content, retreat to my office. Hammer at words for two hours. Feel happy with what I’ve written. Or not. If not, try not to drive my wife crazy talking about it. Commute 75 minutes, listening to audio books. Currently engrossed in Stephen King’s Dr. Sleep. Twenty to thirty minutes before arriving at day job, give left-brain a rest, turn off book, and tune into classical station. See psychotherapy clients 5 – 6 hours. Listen. Play games on the floor—most of the clients are children. Thank God this is fun! Back in the car and back to Dr. Sleep. Wind down munching on chips and watching reruns of Dance Academy on Netflix. Sleep. Dream, dream about the novel you’re writing.

When and why did you begin writing?

I felt the call. That’s something we either listen to or we don’t. If we do, we’re happy and we’re dong our soul work. If we ignore it, we’re on a fast train to a miserable life. Sometime in my twenties I understood this. I had dabbled with writing in the 1980s. I may have the beginning of a few stories lying around. It wasn’t until 1998 that I got serious after reading a slew of Oz books. I haven’t looked back.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Probably when I was wrapping up the first draft of my first novel; I saw that I had actually woven a story that held together. But maybe it was before that. My wife had asked me to write a story for her to illustrate. I came up with two of them, but one tale had a clear voice, which, while it’s evolved over the years, is still essentially mine.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

What if your world was six miles wide and endlessly long?

After a devastating storm kills his parents, five-year-old Wend awakens to the strange world of the Stream. He discovers he can only travel downstream, and dangers lurk at every turn: deadly rapids, ruthless pirates, a mysterious pavilion that lures him into intoxicating fantasies, and rumor of a giant waterfall at the edge of the world. Defenseless, alone, with only courage and his will to survive, Wend begins his quest to become a man. Will tragic loss trap him in a shadow world, or will he enter the Stream, with all its passion and peril?

Part coming-of-age tale, part adventure, part spiritual journey, The Stream is a fable about life, impermanence, and the gifts found in each moment.

What inspired you to write this book?

The idea came from a conversation I was having where I was using the metaphor of a stream. But the philosophical underpinnings of the story date back years. I did a lot of yoga and meditation starting in middle school. In high school, Herman Hesse’s masterpiece, Siddhartha, had a huge affect on me. Who wouldn’t want to achieve Nirvana? I took a class called Eastern Religion and Philosophy, adding to my understanding and interest in Buddhism. More recently, I’ve embraced the use of mindfulness and compassion in my work as a psychologist. But maybe it really dates back to that sailing trip I took with a good friend and his father when I was in high school. We journeyed up the Sacramento River and anchored in a peaceful byway. Those images found their way into the book.

Do you have a specific writing style?

Everyone does. The trick is to get out of the way of it and let it sing. I’m also a pianist and a composer, so I’m very aware of the rhythm of my sentences, not just individually, but next to each other. If it doesn’t sound right to me, if it feels off, I rework it. I also love the sound of words. Sometimes I’ll choose a word as much because of how it sounds as what it means.

How did you come up with the title of this book?

Titles are the hardest for me. I came up with several options and polled my beta readers as well as people who hadn’t read the book. There were several strong candidates, but I opted for the simpler title, which seemed fitting for a fable like this one.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Absolutely, but you’ll never get me to say it! As Stephen King said, you want the reader to feel the emotions, not think. So you’ll excuse me if I just invite anyone out there to feel the emotions of the book. I promise you’ll smile; I promise beauty; I promise darkness descending with a vengeance; I promise hope.

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

My wife teases me that I’m all the characters in my stories. That may be partially true, but most of my characters amalgams. Some, though, spring fully blown from who knows where. Those are the ones I love.

What authors have most influenced your life? What about them do you find inspiring?

First and foremost, the many peoples across many lands and time who formed the myths and fairy tales that distill what’s at heart in the human condition. One of the first books I saw, The Way of the Whirlwind, my parents bought for my brother and me before we were born. It’s about two aborigine bush children, Nungaree and Jungaree, who set out to find their baby brother, who trickster, Whirlwind, stole. The illustrations were colorful and magical, and made me feel that all things in the world were sentient and animated. Fertile ground for a budding fantasy writer! A fifth grade teacher turned on to The Hobbit, and as soon as I could find The Lord of the Rings, it was all over for me.

If you had to choose, is there a writer would you consider a mentor? Why?

The real life mentor was my father. He wrote a play, Open Secret, that was included in a volume of best one-act plays in the 40s. He also wrote the original screenplay for the movie, Baby Face Nelson, starring Mickey Rooney. He used to play a game with me as kid. We came up with characters with opposing motives, and then made up stories to fit the characters. It seemed like magic to me, and of course, I never forgot the underlying message: characters make your story.

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator?

My website designer, Diane Widdon, is also a graphic artist. She did a fabulous job on the cover for the ebook edition of my first novel, Wyndano’s Cloak, so I knew I wanted her for The Stream. For both books, I selected several photos (after sifting through hundreds!) and asked her to work up three designs. There was no doubt which one I would use for Wyndano’s Cloak. The black background, the intensity on the girls face, the sword, the silver lettering, all said FANTASY! Including the cloak wasn’t necessary. Diane came up with two great covers for The Stream. I polled people to see which design would most likely get them to buy the book. The majority chose the mysterious one you see here. I’m keeping the other one, though, and may use it down the road.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

Write the truth.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

The best part of writing is sharing my work with you. I’ve met you in bookstores and online; many of you I’ll never forget. The most profound thing for me as a writer is knowing that what’s in my heart, resonated in yours.

The Stream Book CoverA. R. Silverberry
Northern California, USA

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Publisher: Tree Tunnel Press
Book Cover Designer: Diane Widdon of Novel Website Design

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