Category Archives: Author Interviews

Author Interview: Robert Mullin

Robert Mullin is a cryptozoologist who has traveled to Africa three times in search of a living dinosaur. He was featured on an episode of the History Channel’s television show, Monster Quest. I am pleased to welcome him here on No Wasted Ink.

Author Robert MullinMy name is Robert Mullin, and I am a couch potato who has traveled to Africa three times in search of an animal whose physical description matches that of a living dinosaur. I am interested in a number of eclectic subjects, most of which reside just off the borders of the known realm.

When and why did you begin writing?

Though I had done a number of smaller projects in my early years, I didn’t begin writing in earnest until I was in college, when an English teacher told me, upon reading one of my papers, that I was going to be a writer. Coincidentally, my cousin and I were playing with the beginnings of a story at the time, and I decided to see if my instructor’s words were prophetic.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Probably not until I finished my first “real” novel in 1998 and realized that, clunky as it was, it was a complete, coherent story with the potential for broader audience appeal.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

Bid the Gods Arise tells the story of two cousins sold into slavery on another world and getting caught up in the machinations of an ancient evil that hunts their souls. The series is a mythic hybrid drawing from a number of genres, from epic fantasy to supernatural to science fiction. These are not set at odds with each other, but part of the whole cloth of the narrative.

What inspired you to write this book?

My late cousin and I used to take walks and talk about movies and novels we enjoyed. One of our laments was that there were a great number of stories whose premises were sabotaged by poor execution. While we’ve all seen a number of well done but unoriginal films, we felt that most of the really interesting stories that could have been truly great were lackluster because the treatment did not meet the high bar set by the concept. Perhaps somewhat arrogantly (or at least naïvely), we set out to rectify that with our own story, borrowing liberally from various things we found interesting, but in a setting entirely our own. All good authors steal, but the smart ones file off the serial numbers, so I don’t tend to reveal most of my inspirational sources.

I can say that my Star Wars fandom has probably played the most significant role in terms of how I approach the fiction itself. While that series, like most masterpieces, is inherently flawed, I very much identified with the notion of trying to make the unfamiliar familiar, and utilizing grand mythic themes to tell otherwise simple human tales. I tend to prefer mystical/spiritual fantasy to magical fantasy, so in that respect as well the story borrows heavily from the Star Wars model. I deliberately tried to stay away from the fantasy/sci-fi clichés of unpronounceable names and implausible magic systems, and instead focused on real, memorable people who are the true heart of this cosmic drama.

Do you have a specific writing style?

I don’t think so. I grew up reading the classics, so I had to unlearn what are now considered bad habits for writers. I have not read the works of most of the authors I have been compared to, so I can’t really say how accurate those comparisons are.

How did you come up with the title of this book?

The title literally woke me up one night as I was still working on one of the early drafts. It seemed to sum up the primary theme of the novel and have a unique cadence. It might be a bit like catching lightning in a bottle; the tentative titles for the subsequent novels in the series don’t have that structure though they will feel consistent.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

I prefer readers to draw their own conclusions. Like Tolkien, I “cordially dislike allegory,” and “prefer history—true or feigned—with its varied applicability to the thought and experience of readers.” I don’t think it’s possible to read Bid the Gods Arise without knowing where I stand on certain things, but I would hope that I do not bludgeon readers with my worldview, but rather allow it to shape the tale just as most authors do, consciously or unconsciously. I suppose that if there were one thing I would hope people take away, it would be the notion of hope and choice in the face of what appears to be fate.

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

The relationship between the two primary characters is an oblique homage to the relationship I enjoyed with my own cousin, and one of the recurring dreams the visionary character has is a dream that used to wake me up at night when I was a boy. The other characters and events generally draw more from history, the classics, or people I know secondhand. My travels to Africa did help shape a few elements, but they came after the first drafts of the novel were done, so they aren’t overt.

What authors have most influenced your life? What about them do you find inspiring?

C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, Jules Verne, Herman Melville, Timothy Zahn, to name just a few. Each one of them has taken me to other worlds (or at least far away and exotic places), and the latter, more contemporary, has the gift of getting me to turn the pages without being aware of the fact that I am reading. The authors I most admire have created worlds to which I long to return, either because of the magic of their storytelling or the power of their convictions.

If you had to choose, is there a writer would you consider a mentor? Why?

C. S. Lewis, because of the approach he took with his novels. He and Tolkien decided that when no one was writing the books they wanted to write, they would just have to write them themselves. That’s something I can definitely identify with. But I also very much admire the way he integrated his personal apologetics, philosophy, and worldview into his novels. Lewis was a brilliant man, and I would have loved to sit at the feet of the master and learn all I could from him.

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator?

James Cline of Kanion Rhodes Studio. He had done the covers for a series done by a friend of mine (K.G. Powderly’s Windows of Heaven series), and I actually suggested him as a possibility for my fellow Crimson Moon Press author, J.C. Lamont. After he proved that he was able to visualize some of the unique concepts for her books, I talked with him about my own.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

Don’t fall into the trap of wanting to publish the first book before the second is complete. Get off Facebook. Don’t let life stress you out to the point that you forget to write.

Oh, wait, this is supposed to be advice for other people.

Read everything you can, and learn as much as possible about the craft. Learn the rules like a pro so you can break them like an artist. If you think you’re ready to publish, sit on it, finish the second book, and then go back and revisit the first.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Thanks for taking the time to let me talk to you, and I look forward to feedback from new readers! For the longsuffering fans waiting patiently for the sequel, please do not give up on me.

Bid the Gods AriseRobert Mullin

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Bid the Gods Arise

Cover artist: James Cline
Crimson Moon Press

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BARNES & NOBLE

Author Interview: M. P. McVey

M.P. McVey is an up and coming fantasy and science fiction author. Please welcome him to No Wasted Ink.

Author MP McVeyMy name is Michael McVey. I write fantasy and sci-fi books and stories under the name M.P. McVey. I live in Columbus, Ohio with my ever-patient girlfriend Laura, and our two cats; a one-eyed cat with a deviated septum named Stanley and an ornery kitten we call Gandalf, the mostly grey.

When and why did you begin writing?

I wrote a couple of short stories during my early years in elementary school. Of course, they were part of school work, but I remember loving the creativity that it involved—writing stories in made up places with strange twists and even stranger characters. It was very empowering for a young kid. Then in the eighth grade I had a teacher named Mr. Evans that told me that I had a ‘way with words’ and encouraged me to write more, which I did.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Some people get pretty creative with how they refer to themselves, whether it be writer, author, novelist, scribe, poet, or playwright. My friend Joe and I (Joe did the wonderful artwork for my cover) often joke about being wordsmiths, because of how diligent we are with our word placement. But as far as being considered a “professional writer”? I’m not sure if I’m there yet, but I’ve considered myself a storyteller for many years.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

Plod On, Sleepless Giant is a contemporary fantasy that was released this past February 2015 by Mount Air Publishing. It takes place in my hometown of Columbus, Ohio, but tells a story that delves deep into our world. At the center of Earth lives Temelephas, an ancient elephant chained to his wooden wheel. He was created to remember nothing and to feel nothing … only to walk and turn our globe. But over time he changes and begins to remember things and experiences emotions that he is entirely unfamiliar with. And as it happens, he momentarily stops his walk and the earth ceases in its turning and chaos ensues on the surface above. From that point on we see how the humans in the story—and the powers that be—choose to carry on, and how they set out to fix the wrongs that had been done.

What inspired you to write this book?

The funny thing about ideas is how they sometimes just appear out of nowhere. The idea for Plod On, Sleepless Giant actually came to me in a dream. I was moving through dark caverns, the light of flickering flames bouncing off of the curving walls. There was a loud, thundering noise and the ground shook, but I kept moving toward the noise. I found myself in a large cave, and the noise was terrible. There in the middle of the cave was an ancient elephant chained to a large, wooden wheel. I remember the elephant—whom I would later name Temelephas—very clearly, in my dream he was so ancient and slow, and appeared to be chiseled out of granite. It was at that moment that I knew he was the reason for the turning of our world. When I woke I was very anxious and I quickly wrote the idea down on a scrap piece of paper; just the idea of an ancient elephant and his wheel. It would take me a few months to even conceive of the story that would build around him.

Do you have a specific writing style?

Yeah, I’d say I have my own style. It really is the fingerprint of the writer, the only trace of evidence we leave at the crime scene. I think my style is more about a rhythm to the words than anything else. I like to write flowery prose at times, but I also like to write something pretty straight forward from time to time, like a punch to the face. But the rhythm of the words, that’s where my stamp lies.

How did you come up with the title of this book?

The title came last, I had simply been referring to it as Temelephas throughout the whole writing process. I think the title was more of a plea that I felt would be heard by my ancient elephant … a plea from the world for him to press forward, as we all must at some times—no matter how terrible things may seem. Temelephas doesn’t sleep, you see … in fact, he’s pretty interested in the idea of it—especially the part about dreaming.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

I try not to be too preachy when it comes to things like that, but I suppose that we can’t really help it. All writers are telling you something, whether they know it or not, but I never set out to tell anything more than a story. I really enjoy it when readers tell me the messages they take away from the book … little pieces of wisdom that they carried away from the page. I can’t help but feel pride in that … that words I wrote somehow sparked an idea in another person’s head, and maybe it will be passed on from one person to another. A string of ideas that may trace back to one little section from a book I wrote. So they ask, “Did you mean this?” or “I love how you said that”, and I smile at them. Maybe it meant that and perhaps this … I’m glad that people read my words so carefully.

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know, or events in your life?

Everything we write is somewhat based on something in our lives, right? I have characters in my book that are directly based on people I know, some are even named after them. The little blonde girl named Addison on page 114 is actually based on my niece of the same name. I remember the page so specifically, because she loves it when I read that little part to her. But all of the main characters are completely fictional, though they may be fragments of myself. I think the views and attitudes of each character, however, they may vary, come from me a bit. I seem to have left a little of me inside each of them.

What authors have influenced your life? What about them do you find inspiring?

This is a great question. I think W.P. Kinsella has influenced my life the most. He is a very talented author that has had many struggles through his life; he has had to hold many jobs as he came up as a writer, never finding success easily. I like to see people become successful that had to work hard for what they have. It reminds me that the road that lays before me as a writer is a hard and long road, but that the destination is worth the hardships.

If you had to choose, is there a writer you would consider a mentor? Why?

I would have to say Kinsella for that as well. I wrote to him once, having heard of his accident(he had been hit by a car and the injuries he sustained had affected his ability to write), I wanted to wish him well. I told him about my own writing and asked him what advice he might pass along. It took him nearly three months to respond, but he did. It was a very friendly email and he spoke to me about his accident a bit and the frustrations he felt over his inability to focus on his writing. He told me to read and read and read, which is the best advice for any would be writer.

Who designed the cover for your book? Why did you select this illustrator?

My best friend Joe Reisinger did the artwork for the cover. He’s also a talented writer, when he finds the time. I knew I wanted him to do the cover when I first started writing the book. He has such a great imagination, and he and I pretty much saw the cover the same way in our minds.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

Just as Mr. Kinsella said … read, read, and read some more. Anyone can come up with an idea for a story, it’s in how you tell the story that makes it a good one. We only learn the skill of storytelling from hearing and reading stories. So read until you feel your eyes may fall out of your skulls, and read to your little ones if you have them.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Most importantly, thank you for reading my book. I know the world is a busy place and free time is a commodity that we have very little of, so thank you for spending even a bit of it with me.

Book Cover Plod On Sleepless GiantM.P. McVey
Columbus, Ohio

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Plod On, Sleepless Giant

Cover Artist:Joe Reisinger (he has no links, sadly … but he can be contacted through me)

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BARNES & NOBLE

Author Interview: R. Lee Walsh

When I asked epic fantasy author R. Lee Walsh to describe herself, she said, “Author, Artist and student of the impossible.” I think that this is a good description of how most authors feel about themselves. Please welcome her to No Wasted Ink.

Author R. Lee WalshAm I the only one who feels awkward when talking about themselves? As a mother of two beautiful daughters who are nearly grown now, my life is filled with the typical joys and angst of raising strong, independent, women. I’ve also been the at home caretaker for my grandfather who suffers from advanced Alzheimer’s. I always consider myself a mother first, then a writer and last an artist and poet. I’ve been writing now for thirteen years, three of those full time.

I live in scenic North Idaho and also have two dogs and a cat who I find are the perfect writing partners. They listen attentively and never criticize me for those entire days I wasted on a chapter that seemed like a good idea when I was taking a shower but may or may not have merely been a side effect of watching too much YouTube, not enough sleep or too much Splenda in my coffee.

As a full-time writer, my life sounds pretty boring on paper. I mean, I sit in front of a computer several hours a day and dream up ways to torture my imaginary friends with hopeless situations, supernatural villains and unsolved mysteries. There are wondrous days when my friends surprise me and all my plot lines mesh and many others where I bang my head against the refrigerator at the end of the day and wonder how I ever thought I could do this job. However, the truth is, I love my life and what I do. I can’t imagine doing anything else.

When and why did you begin writing?

Interestingly enough, I began writing during a very stressful time in my life. My family was dealing with a terrible tragedy and to make matters worse I’d been suffering a health crisis and underwent several painful surgeries. I started writing as an outlet during my recovery and discovered a gift I didn’t know I had. Thirteen years later I’m still writing but feel like I’m just getting started.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I think I really considered myself a writer when I finished my first book. It was a memoir about my life during the year when my whole family was falling apart and just writing it was a huge accomplishment. I also had some award winning poems that sparked a line of greeting cards. While I very much enjoy writing non-fiction and poetry, fiction is my passion.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

The Last Scribe Series is a ten part epic fantasy about the last surviving descendant of Enoch, an unusual girl who unknowingly inherits the secret of creation. Based on actual prophecies and controversial historical information hidden in the Apocrypha, supernatural forces wage war for control of this unusual girl who has no idea that the seemingly innocent things she’s writing in her diary are actually creating a new world.

While there are multiple installments in the series, in order to give your readers a better understanding, the long and short of it goes something like this:

According to a six thousand year old prophecy hidden in the Apocrypha, the last surviving descendant of Enoch will inherit the secret of creation, enabling him or her to create the future with the stroke of a pen. In order to protect that survivor, the identity of the last descendant has remained one of mankind’s longest running mysteries and is considered by most scholars to be the most dangerous person who will ever live.

Behind the scenes of the world’s largest mega-church, 18-year-old Hope Matthews can’t wait to leave for college. As far as she’s concerned, her stepfather’s meteoric rise to fame as America’s favorite televangelist has done nothing but make her life miserable.

Constantly surrounded by cameras and an embarrassment to her famous family, the only thing worse than her reputation as a troublemaker are the rumors surrounding her personal diary. When a jealous prank between siblings puts the unreadable contents of that diary into the spotlight, she’s labeled as suffering from mental illness. She soon finds herself the target of a bizarre conspiracy, accused of a brutal murder.

Wanted by the authorities and unaware of her world changing power, she flees from the sheltered life she’s known. Hiding herself in an underground world of runaways, rebels and graffiti artists, she’s secretly followed and protected by a powerful stranger named Yuri, whose mysterious origins run deeper than the scars that cover his body. A violent encounter uncovers the truth about her heritage, and she is faced with an impossible choice – if she saves herself and the people who betrayed her, it will destroy everyone she loves.

From the streets of Portland, Oregon, to the catacombs of Paris, an ordinary girl with an extraordinary destiny must find the courage to write a new world into existence as supernatural forces wage war for control, all of them determined to rewrite the future of humanity by becoming masters of The Last Scribe.

What inspired you to write this book?

One day I was in a second hand book store and saw the Apocrypha. As someone raised in a very religious environment, of course I’d never been allowed to read it. I took it home and read through the whole thing in a few days and when I was done, I knew I had my story.

Do you have a specific writing style?

I’d like to say I’m pretty simple and straight-forward with a touch of humor, but others say world-building and dialog are my strong suits. I don’t know if style is something I can decide for myself at this point.

How did you come up with the title of this book?

It started out as something else and was developed with the help of Michael Neff of Algonkian Workshops. He and I went back and forth several times and actually wrote the synopsis before finally coming to The Last Scribe.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Each and every person has the power to change the world.

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

You know, all writers take some from their own lives and some from others. Being a writer makes you a student of human nature. There are little bits of everyone I’ve ever met in my characters–some more obvious than others. But at the end of the day, I’d have to say the characters wrote themselves. I’m always amazed at how they take on a mind of their own and tell me what they think instead of the other way around. The Last Scribe is really about Hope and her journey to uncover the truth about her heritage and ultimately the purpose of her life.

What authors have most influenced your life? What about them do you find inspiring? This is such a hard question because it depends on circumstances. I remember reading books during certain times of my life and being inspired, then reading them again and wondering why I liked them so much. However, I do have some that I will always love, like Ted Dekker and his When Heaven Weeps Trilogy. The allegorical nature of the story really moved me. I also loved Dean Koontz and the Odd Series as well as his darker, more terrifying novels like What the Night Knows and Relentless. I love the way he always threads faith and hope even in amidst the most horrifying story.

If you had to choose, is there a writer would you consider a mentor? Why? I’m going to say Dean Koontz. I’ve read all his books and truly love how he uses every day people to tell outrageous, horrifying yet somehow inspirational stories. I don’t know any other author who does that.

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator? It was a collaboration between myself and Tim Alexander of DieAtlantic designs. He’s been my website designer for years and got what I was trying to do from the start. I’d recommend him to anybody who wants killer artwork for their books and websites.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

Don’t give up! I can’t tell you how many writers I know who have given up on their stories without ever finishing them. Join a writing group with people you don’t know (objectivity) and really invest yourself in it. Listen to advice and critiques with an eye for improving your writing, not just arguing your point. If you want to be good at any craft, connections, and commitment and ongoing education is paramount. Also, write because you want to and not for money.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Thank you. Every last one of you, the good and bad have made what I do worthwhile.

The Last Scribe Book CoverR. Lee Walsh
Lewiston, Idaho

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Publisher: Story Merchant
Cover Artist: Timothy Alexander

The Last Scribe

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Author Interview: Leisl Kaberry

Leisl Kaberry is a writer of epic fantasy adventure not unlike Lord of the Rings and Dragonlance. I am pleased to introduce this smart young adult author here on No Wasted Ink.

Author Leisl KaberryMy name is Leisl Kaberry and I am an Aussie living in Canada missing the summer heat and beaches of Australia but loving being able to snowboard in the winter… why can’t I just have it all?, the cake and the eating. I am a stay at home mum with four kids, a dog, two cats and a husband… so yep, I keep pretty busy. I am studying part-time a degree in Criminology and Criminal Justice, completely different to writing fantasy but I guess it just engages another part of my brain. I never wanted to be a writer when I was growing up, I was determined to be a theatre actor, I still do the bit of theatre from time to time which I enjoy but now I would much rather be writing… can never get it right!

When and why did you begin writing?

I guess I have been writing as long as I can remember, I mean I always had stories in my head… most I would tell myself, some I would act out and some I would actually write down… or at least make a start. I always loved stories and there was just an overabundance of them in my head, so I guess it was just always in me to be a writer.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

It was a creative spark while my first babe was sleeping that got me writing again after so many years. A simple idea for a scene (nothing really) turned into a plot for complete story, a series. I began to love the writing experience; it was a lot more work then simply coming up with stories but so much more rewarding. It was then that I considered myself a writer.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

My current book is the first book of Titanian Chronicles; Journey of Destiny. It is a Young Adult fantasy adventure that sees two friends set out from the all elvin village they grew up in to seek out what lies beyond the borders for them. Afeclin, a human brought up in the elvin kingdom has magic in his veins and a past that encourages him to follow the path of wizardry, while Wolflang an elf, wishes to break tradition and explore the world before settling down. Little do they know Lenna, an elf-maiden that both friends are in love with, follows them across the border and finds herself in all kinds of trouble as she seeks to find them. In the meantime Moorlan the Warlord together with his confederate, a dark mage have set the wheels in motion to bring war to the peaceful land of Marrapassa putting the three friends in danger. I have now finished the second book in this series and am in the process of publishing it while writing the third.

What inspired you to write this book?

I had read a few fantasy series at the time and was particularly in love with the genre. The Dragonlance Chronicles and David Eddings; The Belgariad series got me so hooked in fantasy worlds that I didn’t like to leave. It was a no brainer that I should want to build my own world to live permanently in my own imagination. The first scene of my story was inspired by a screen saver of a large green moon illuminating over the water… and that’s where it all began.

Do you have a specific writing style?

I like to write in third person from a universal omniscience point of view, I narrate the story, looking on as a God of the world… sort of… or, at least the Chronicler. I tell the story through the main characters and allow the reader to have a glimpse into the dark side point of view through the prologue and epilogue that brings you into the minds of the Warlord and his right hand man.

How did you come up with the title of this book?

From very early on in the writing I called it Master’s Apprentice, taken from the fact that Afeclin wants to become a Master of the Art. Then The Sorcerers Apprentice came out and I started to feel like it was too cliché, unoriginal. I realised that I was chronicling the times of a certain group of people in Titania… hence Titanian Chronicles… and ultimately the story more than anything chronicles three people journeying to find their destiny… it fit.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

That the world is there to grab, you can be what you wanna be, do what you wanna do if you have a bit of courage and determination. We don’t have to be pigeon holed into what is expected of us… not that there is anything wrong with following societal pulls if that is what we truly want out of life. We have choices… our destinies’ are ours for the making.

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

No, all made up I’m afraid… and I do so like a true story. Having said that emotional experiences and feelings that the characters go through are something that usually come from my own experience or what I understand others have gone through.

What authors have most influenced your life? What about them do you find inspiring?

Dr Seuss got me to fall in love with books and reading as a child, C.S Lewis opened my eyes up to the possibilities of other worlds beyond aging old wardrobes while Enid Blyton taught me there were other worlds to explore at the top of a tree. I love Dan Brown’s style and learnt some good writing skills from reading his books. Agatha Christie first influenced my interest in Criminology. They each inspire me to continue on in my own world; to create and be me.

If you had to choose, is there a writer would you consider a mentor? Why?

Actually I have a good friend back in Montreal where I used to live who writes and she helped me a lot with my book when I had first finished writing it. Sadly she has never finished her work of fantasy but she taught me a lot a valuable things to look for and enhance in my writing.

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator?

I met Kristen Caruana through a mutual friend at a luncheon and we hit it off, she was an artist just arrived in town and not yet working so we discussed her doing the cover art for my book. After seeing her work, I was convinced she could capture the cover I wanted and she did not let me down, I wanted my cover to be a piece of classic fantasy art and really that is what it is. She also did a bunch of pictures to go inside the book. She is currently working on the art for my second book.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

If you’re self publishing… it isn’t a race, take your time to get it right before putting your work on display. Take advice and listen to those who have been there before you, there are plenty who are happy to share their mistakes and missteps to help you get it right the first time.

It is scary getting your work out there… it is a big piece of who you are and once it is out there is open to scrutiny, be brave and take criticisms on the chin, some you could take with a grain of salt, others are really worth paying attention to, be open to learning and growing from them. No author… no matter how popular today, started out an expert in their field… it was a long road of growth before becoming what they are. I’m still very much on that road and learning all the time, it’s a great feeling to be teachable.

Book Cover Journey of DestinyLeisl kaberry
Kitimat, British Columbia

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Titanian Chronicles – Journey of Destiny Book 1
Cover Artist: Kristen Caruana

AMAZON
BARNES & NOBLE
SMASHWORDS

Author Interview: Kasper J. Beaumont

Kasper J. Beaumont was born and raised in Australia and lives a quiet life with the family in a seaside town. Combining a love of fantasy and a penchant for travel in the Hunters of Reloria trilogy, Kasper started to write on the urging of friends and family and enjoys watching readers become immersed in the magical world of Reloria. Please welcome her to No Wasted Ink.

Author Kasper BeaumontG’day folks, I’m Kasper Beaumont, a fantasy author from Australia and I’m looking forward to sharing my dragon tales with you. I’m a mild-mannered healthcare worker by trade and when I’m off duty, I turn into a creative fiend, pushing the boundaries of fantasy writing. I juggle writing, work and my three young cherubs and enjoying catching up with my writing group, family and friends. Living the dream.

When and why did you begin writing?

I was really keen on writing as a youngster and teenager, then I discovered travelling and a whole new world opened for me as I backpacked my way across Europe with a bunch of friends. Needless to say there was much partying involved and apart from keeping a journal with self-drawn pictures, my writing was on an extended hiatus. When I finally returned home, I was focused on saving for a house, then marriage and rugrats took up my world. After the 3rd child I was needing some ‘me’ time and an outlet for my creativity, so a whole new career beckoned and here I am, a thrice published author. Sweet!

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Probably not until I published my first book in 2013, so I still consider myself a newbie and am hanging out for a 3 movie deal with Peter Jackson. A girl can dream.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

My latest release is Dragon’s Revenge, which finishes the Hunters of Reloria trilogy. As the title suggests, my badass dragon is majorly peeved when the Cyclops enemy destroys his homeland. He is hell-bent on revenge and must gain the help of the Hunters of Reloria to defeat his nefarious foe. The Hunters of Reloria are a mixed group of heroes, with halfings, dwarves, elves, a mage, a knight and of course, the dragon. They rally to fight the invading forces of Vergai lizardmen and Cyclops giants who shoot laser beams from their eyes. There is magic; battle action with lasers and dragons; romance and sweet fairies in the series – something for everyone.

What inspired you to write this book?

I’ve been planning the trilogy a long time and I’m glad to see the culmination. I’m a big fan of fantasy and all things dragon-related so I guess it was natural that I would write fantasy books. I draw inspiration from the fabulous fantasy artwork I see all around and Anne Stokes is my favourite dragon artist. Many of my young fans send in fantasy artwork as well and I love to hear their feedback and ideas for my new work.

Do you have a specific writing style?

I let the characters write the story and give them a gentle nudge here and there. It’s interesting when they go in a completely different direction to where I think we are headed, but the plot twists make it exciting, so I just go with it. ‘Flying by the seat of my pants’ writing is the only way to go for me.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Magic happens.

If you believe in something enough and work together to utilize your companions and resources to their full strength, then you can achieve anything. Sometimes it is the most unlikely person who can perform an extraordinary act of bravery to save the day.

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

No. I’ve yet to have my homeland invaded by laser-wielding Cyclops, thank goodness!

What authors have most influenced your life?

Tolkein, Eddings and Clive Cussler

What about them do you find inspiring?

The way they can all make the most incredible adventures believable and realistic. You leave reality at the door and buckle up for a roller-coaster ride of excitement. If I can give my readers that experience, then I consider my job well done.

If you had to choose, is there a writer would you consider a mentor?

No, I wouldn’t say a mentor, for I haven’t met any of my favourite authors. How cool that would be to have them pour over my first draft and make a few suggestions.

Who designed the cover of your book?

I employed a local spray paint artist to do the covers for the trilogy. His name is Scott Patterson and I really admire his work. He threw me a curve ball with the Dragon’s Revenge cover because he changed from spray paint to digital. I was a bit worried at first that the style would be different to the others, but I am really stoked with the end result. Some artists can do anything.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

Just the advice that I keep telling myself: remember to write every day. Life is so busy that you really have to make time for the things that matter. Oh, and find a good editor when you’re done. That’s very important too.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

I love to get feedback, so please do a review or send me a message to tell me know what you think of the Hunters of Reloria trilogy and what you would like me to write next. Always happy to oblige.

Book Cover Dragon's RevengeKasper Beaumont
near Brisbane, Australia

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Dragon’s Revenge – Book 3 in the Hunters of Reloria series

AMAZON
BARNES & NOBLE
SMASHWORDS