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Author Interview: C. S. Marks

C.S. Marks prefers the classic epic tale, told in a slightly more contemporary voice. Her work may be read and enjoyed by all ages and on many levels of complexity, from the superficial action/adventure to the deep, thought-provoking level appreciated by the more serious and introspective reader. I’m honored to feature her on No Wasted Ink.

Author CS MarksI’m C.S. Marks, best known in the writing world for the Elfhunter trilogy. I hold a Ph.D. in Life Sciences, I am a life-long horsewoman and competitive long-distance rider, and I have spent the past 23 years as a Professor of Equine Science. My other interests include art, archery and bow-making, songwriting, and filk-singing. (I also have thirteen dogs on the farm. Ye gods.)

When and why did you begin writing?

I don’t remember when I first began writing; my dad was a Professor of Literature, and he instilled a love of words, reading, and writing at a very early age. Serious writing began the year he died suddenly…to fill a hole, I expect.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

I’ve just released Outcaste, which is the first in a new Alterran series. I’m currently working on the second in that series, entitled Anastasi. Also starting work on an unrelated novel.

What inspired you to write this book?

Let’s go back to the beginning, to Elfhunter.
Actually, it was the villain, Gorgon Elfhunter, who inspired me. His is a story that just needed to be told.

Do you have a specific writing style?

I probably do, but not sure how to describe it. As with any writer, it has evolved over the years. I like well-written narrative, I hate infodumps, I try to include enough description to fire the readers’ imaginations without overdoing it, and I love dialogue. Others have described my stuff as “Martin-esque with a bit of Stephen King influence.” I find that interesting, as I didn’t read anything of Mr. Martin’s until after the trilogy was long finished. My love for Tolkien is obvious, but my style is quite different.

How did you come up with the title of this book?

It is the story of Gorgon Elfhunter. There could be no other title. Sometimes the title of a book won’t reveal itself to me until the book is nearly finished, as was the case with Ravenshade.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

That is a vast question, and there are many ways to answer it, depending on the reader. Over the course of five novels, the “message” has developed with the story. If I had to condense it, it would concern themes of good and evil, love and hate—and what happens in between when the lines are blurred and the path is no longer clear. It would focus on the choices we make, which define our character, and that we are not at the mercy of circumstance if we choose to defy it and remain true to who we are. The newer series really focuses on the nature of prejudice, and how it may (or may not) be overcome.

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Yes, some are. The horses, for example, are all based on horses I either have owned or currently own. I have been told that I write some of the best horse characters in fantasy, which is not surprising considering my life-long obsession. There are countless other examples of events and characters based on experience…I’ll keep them to myself for now.

What authors have most influenced your life? What about them do you find inspiring?

I adore James Herriot. From him I learned to write what I know and tell my story from the heart. I admire Stephen King, who taught me the rules of writing and how to break them. I will always love Tolkien…the man who defines what epic fantasy is, and should be, at least to me.

If you had to choose, is there a writer would you consider a mentor? Why?

My dad would have been a great one. It is one of my greatest regrets that he did not live to see my work in print. He was editing my stuff since I was about eight years old; from him I learned to loathe exclamation points and not fear the occasional adverb.

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator?

Concept by me, artwork by Hope Hoover (Elfhunter) or John Connell (Fire-heart, Ravenshade, Outcaste). Hope and John were chosen for the quality of their work, and because they are willing to work in close cooperation with the author.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

Of course—don’t we all? In a few words, “Try to be realistic in your expectations, hire the best editor you can afford, and realize that not everyone will love your work…and that’s ok!”

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

You guys know how much I appreciate you. If you loved the Elfhunter trilogy, wait til you read Outcaste. And if you loved Outcaste, wait til Anastasi comes out. (You ain’t seen nothin’ yet.)

Book Cover ElfhunterC.S. Marks

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Cover Artist: John Connell
Publisher: Parthian Press

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Author Interview: Robert Mullin

Robert Mullin is a cryptozoologist who has traveled to Africa three times in search of a living dinosaur. He was featured on an episode of the History Channel’s television show, Monster Quest. I am pleased to welcome him here on No Wasted Ink.

Author Robert MullinMy name is Robert Mullin, and I am a couch potato who has traveled to Africa three times in search of an animal whose physical description matches that of a living dinosaur. I am interested in a number of eclectic subjects, most of which reside just off the borders of the known realm.

When and why did you begin writing?

Though I had done a number of smaller projects in my early years, I didn’t begin writing in earnest until I was in college, when an English teacher told me, upon reading one of my papers, that I was going to be a writer. Coincidentally, my cousin and I were playing with the beginnings of a story at the time, and I decided to see if my instructor’s words were prophetic.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Probably not until I finished my first “real” novel in 1998 and realized that, clunky as it was, it was a complete, coherent story with the potential for broader audience appeal.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

Bid the Gods Arise tells the story of two cousins sold into slavery on another world and getting caught up in the machinations of an ancient evil that hunts their souls. The series is a mythic hybrid drawing from a number of genres, from epic fantasy to supernatural to science fiction. These are not set at odds with each other, but part of the whole cloth of the narrative.

What inspired you to write this book?

My late cousin and I used to take walks and talk about movies and novels we enjoyed. One of our laments was that there were a great number of stories whose premises were sabotaged by poor execution. While we’ve all seen a number of well done but unoriginal films, we felt that most of the really interesting stories that could have been truly great were lackluster because the treatment did not meet the high bar set by the concept. Perhaps somewhat arrogantly (or at least naïvely), we set out to rectify that with our own story, borrowing liberally from various things we found interesting, but in a setting entirely our own. All good authors steal, but the smart ones file off the serial numbers, so I don’t tend to reveal most of my inspirational sources.

I can say that my Star Wars fandom has probably played the most significant role in terms of how I approach the fiction itself. While that series, like most masterpieces, is inherently flawed, I very much identified with the notion of trying to make the unfamiliar familiar, and utilizing grand mythic themes to tell otherwise simple human tales. I tend to prefer mystical/spiritual fantasy to magical fantasy, so in that respect as well the story borrows heavily from the Star Wars model. I deliberately tried to stay away from the fantasy/sci-fi clichés of unpronounceable names and implausible magic systems, and instead focused on real, memorable people who are the true heart of this cosmic drama.

Do you have a specific writing style?

I don’t think so. I grew up reading the classics, so I had to unlearn what are now considered bad habits for writers. I have not read the works of most of the authors I have been compared to, so I can’t really say how accurate those comparisons are.

How did you come up with the title of this book?

The title literally woke me up one night as I was still working on one of the early drafts. It seemed to sum up the primary theme of the novel and have a unique cadence. It might be a bit like catching lightning in a bottle; the tentative titles for the subsequent novels in the series don’t have that structure though they will feel consistent.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

I prefer readers to draw their own conclusions. Like Tolkien, I “cordially dislike allegory,” and “prefer history—true or feigned—with its varied applicability to the thought and experience of readers.” I don’t think it’s possible to read Bid the Gods Arise without knowing where I stand on certain things, but I would hope that I do not bludgeon readers with my worldview, but rather allow it to shape the tale just as most authors do, consciously or unconsciously. I suppose that if there were one thing I would hope people take away, it would be the notion of hope and choice in the face of what appears to be fate.

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

The relationship between the two primary characters is an oblique homage to the relationship I enjoyed with my own cousin, and one of the recurring dreams the visionary character has is a dream that used to wake me up at night when I was a boy. The other characters and events generally draw more from history, the classics, or people I know secondhand. My travels to Africa did help shape a few elements, but they came after the first drafts of the novel were done, so they aren’t overt.

What authors have most influenced your life? What about them do you find inspiring?

C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, Jules Verne, Herman Melville, Timothy Zahn, to name just a few. Each one of them has taken me to other worlds (or at least far away and exotic places), and the latter, more contemporary, has the gift of getting me to turn the pages without being aware of the fact that I am reading. The authors I most admire have created worlds to which I long to return, either because of the magic of their storytelling or the power of their convictions.

If you had to choose, is there a writer would you consider a mentor? Why?

C. S. Lewis, because of the approach he took with his novels. He and Tolkien decided that when no one was writing the books they wanted to write, they would just have to write them themselves. That’s something I can definitely identify with. But I also very much admire the way he integrated his personal apologetics, philosophy, and worldview into his novels. Lewis was a brilliant man, and I would have loved to sit at the feet of the master and learn all I could from him.

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator?

James Cline of Kanion Rhodes Studio. He had done the covers for a series done by a friend of mine (K.G. Powderly’s Windows of Heaven series), and I actually suggested him as a possibility for my fellow Crimson Moon Press author, J.C. Lamont. After he proved that he was able to visualize some of the unique concepts for her books, I talked with him about my own.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

Don’t fall into the trap of wanting to publish the first book before the second is complete. Get off Facebook. Don’t let life stress you out to the point that you forget to write.

Oh, wait, this is supposed to be advice for other people.

Read everything you can, and learn as much as possible about the craft. Learn the rules like a pro so you can break them like an artist. If you think you’re ready to publish, sit on it, finish the second book, and then go back and revisit the first.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Thanks for taking the time to let me talk to you, and I look forward to feedback from new readers! For the longsuffering fans waiting patiently for the sequel, please do not give up on me.

Bid the Gods AriseRobert Mullin

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Author Interview: R. Lee Walsh

When I asked epic fantasy author R. Lee Walsh to describe herself, she said, “Author, Artist and student of the impossible.” I think that this is a good description of how most authors feel about themselves. Please welcome her to No Wasted Ink.

Author R. Lee WalshAm I the only one who feels awkward when talking about themselves? As a mother of two beautiful daughters who are nearly grown now, my life is filled with the typical joys and angst of raising strong, independent, women. I’ve also been the at home caretaker for my grandfather who suffers from advanced Alzheimer’s. I always consider myself a mother first, then a writer and last an artist and poet. I’ve been writing now for thirteen years, three of those full time.

I live in scenic North Idaho and also have two dogs and a cat who I find are the perfect writing partners. They listen attentively and never criticize me for those entire days I wasted on a chapter that seemed like a good idea when I was taking a shower but may or may not have merely been a side effect of watching too much YouTube, not enough sleep or too much Splenda in my coffee.

As a full-time writer, my life sounds pretty boring on paper. I mean, I sit in front of a computer several hours a day and dream up ways to torture my imaginary friends with hopeless situations, supernatural villains and unsolved mysteries. There are wondrous days when my friends surprise me and all my plot lines mesh and many others where I bang my head against the refrigerator at the end of the day and wonder how I ever thought I could do this job. However, the truth is, I love my life and what I do. I can’t imagine doing anything else.

When and why did you begin writing?

Interestingly enough, I began writing during a very stressful time in my life. My family was dealing with a terrible tragedy and to make matters worse I’d been suffering a health crisis and underwent several painful surgeries. I started writing as an outlet during my recovery and discovered a gift I didn’t know I had. Thirteen years later I’m still writing but feel like I’m just getting started.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I think I really considered myself a writer when I finished my first book. It was a memoir about my life during the year when my whole family was falling apart and just writing it was a huge accomplishment. I also had some award winning poems that sparked a line of greeting cards. While I very much enjoy writing non-fiction and poetry, fiction is my passion.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

The Last Scribe Series is a ten part epic fantasy about the last surviving descendant of Enoch, an unusual girl who unknowingly inherits the secret of creation. Based on actual prophecies and controversial historical information hidden in the Apocrypha, supernatural forces wage war for control of this unusual girl who has no idea that the seemingly innocent things she’s writing in her diary are actually creating a new world.

While there are multiple installments in the series, in order to give your readers a better understanding, the long and short of it goes something like this:

According to a six thousand year old prophecy hidden in the Apocrypha, the last surviving descendant of Enoch will inherit the secret of creation, enabling him or her to create the future with the stroke of a pen. In order to protect that survivor, the identity of the last descendant has remained one of mankind’s longest running mysteries and is considered by most scholars to be the most dangerous person who will ever live.

Behind the scenes of the world’s largest mega-church, 18-year-old Hope Matthews can’t wait to leave for college. As far as she’s concerned, her stepfather’s meteoric rise to fame as America’s favorite televangelist has done nothing but make her life miserable.

Constantly surrounded by cameras and an embarrassment to her famous family, the only thing worse than her reputation as a troublemaker are the rumors surrounding her personal diary. When a jealous prank between siblings puts the unreadable contents of that diary into the spotlight, she’s labeled as suffering from mental illness. She soon finds herself the target of a bizarre conspiracy, accused of a brutal murder.

Wanted by the authorities and unaware of her world changing power, she flees from the sheltered life she’s known. Hiding herself in an underground world of runaways, rebels and graffiti artists, she’s secretly followed and protected by a powerful stranger named Yuri, whose mysterious origins run deeper than the scars that cover his body. A violent encounter uncovers the truth about her heritage, and she is faced with an impossible choice – if she saves herself and the people who betrayed her, it will destroy everyone she loves.

From the streets of Portland, Oregon, to the catacombs of Paris, an ordinary girl with an extraordinary destiny must find the courage to write a new world into existence as supernatural forces wage war for control, all of them determined to rewrite the future of humanity by becoming masters of The Last Scribe.

What inspired you to write this book?

One day I was in a second hand book store and saw the Apocrypha. As someone raised in a very religious environment, of course I’d never been allowed to read it. I took it home and read through the whole thing in a few days and when I was done, I knew I had my story.

Do you have a specific writing style?

I’d like to say I’m pretty simple and straight-forward with a touch of humor, but others say world-building and dialog are my strong suits. I don’t know if style is something I can decide for myself at this point.

How did you come up with the title of this book?

It started out as something else and was developed with the help of Michael Neff of Algonkian Workshops. He and I went back and forth several times and actually wrote the synopsis before finally coming to The Last Scribe.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Each and every person has the power to change the world.

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

You know, all writers take some from their own lives and some from others. Being a writer makes you a student of human nature. There are little bits of everyone I’ve ever met in my characters–some more obvious than others. But at the end of the day, I’d have to say the characters wrote themselves. I’m always amazed at how they take on a mind of their own and tell me what they think instead of the other way around. The Last Scribe is really about Hope and her journey to uncover the truth about her heritage and ultimately the purpose of her life.

What authors have most influenced your life? What about them do you find inspiring? This is such a hard question because it depends on circumstances. I remember reading books during certain times of my life and being inspired, then reading them again and wondering why I liked them so much. However, I do have some that I will always love, like Ted Dekker and his When Heaven Weeps Trilogy. The allegorical nature of the story really moved me. I also loved Dean Koontz and the Odd Series as well as his darker, more terrifying novels like What the Night Knows and Relentless. I love the way he always threads faith and hope even in amidst the most horrifying story.

If you had to choose, is there a writer would you consider a mentor? Why? I’m going to say Dean Koontz. I’ve read all his books and truly love how he uses every day people to tell outrageous, horrifying yet somehow inspirational stories. I don’t know any other author who does that.

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator? It was a collaboration between myself and Tim Alexander of DieAtlantic designs. He’s been my website designer for years and got what I was trying to do from the start. I’d recommend him to anybody who wants killer artwork for their books and websites.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

Don’t give up! I can’t tell you how many writers I know who have given up on their stories without ever finishing them. Join a writing group with people you don’t know (objectivity) and really invest yourself in it. Listen to advice and critiques with an eye for improving your writing, not just arguing your point. If you want to be good at any craft, connections, and commitment and ongoing education is paramount. Also, write because you want to and not for money.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Thank you. Every last one of you, the good and bad have made what I do worthwhile.

The Last Scribe Book CoverR. Lee Walsh
Lewiston, Idaho

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Author Interview: Kasper J. Beaumont

Kasper J. Beaumont was born and raised in Australia and lives a quiet life with the family in a seaside town. Combining a love of fantasy and a penchant for travel in the Hunters of Reloria trilogy, Kasper started to write on the urging of friends and family and enjoys watching readers become immersed in the magical world of Reloria. Please welcome her to No Wasted Ink.

Author Kasper BeaumontG’day folks, I’m Kasper Beaumont, a fantasy author from Australia and I’m looking forward to sharing my dragon tales with you. I’m a mild-mannered healthcare worker by trade and when I’m off duty, I turn into a creative fiend, pushing the boundaries of fantasy writing. I juggle writing, work and my three young cherubs and enjoying catching up with my writing group, family and friends. Living the dream.

When and why did you begin writing?

I was really keen on writing as a youngster and teenager, then I discovered travelling and a whole new world opened for me as I backpacked my way across Europe with a bunch of friends. Needless to say there was much partying involved and apart from keeping a journal with self-drawn pictures, my writing was on an extended hiatus. When I finally returned home, I was focused on saving for a house, then marriage and rugrats took up my world. After the 3rd child I was needing some ‘me’ time and an outlet for my creativity, so a whole new career beckoned and here I am, a thrice published author. Sweet!

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Probably not until I published my first book in 2013, so I still consider myself a newbie and am hanging out for a 3 movie deal with Peter Jackson. A girl can dream.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

My latest release is Dragon’s Revenge, which finishes the Hunters of Reloria trilogy. As the title suggests, my badass dragon is majorly peeved when the Cyclops enemy destroys his homeland. He is hell-bent on revenge and must gain the help of the Hunters of Reloria to defeat his nefarious foe. The Hunters of Reloria are a mixed group of heroes, with halfings, dwarves, elves, a mage, a knight and of course, the dragon. They rally to fight the invading forces of Vergai lizardmen and Cyclops giants who shoot laser beams from their eyes. There is magic; battle action with lasers and dragons; romance and sweet fairies in the series – something for everyone.

What inspired you to write this book?

I’ve been planning the trilogy a long time and I’m glad to see the culmination. I’m a big fan of fantasy and all things dragon-related so I guess it was natural that I would write fantasy books. I draw inspiration from the fabulous fantasy artwork I see all around and Anne Stokes is my favourite dragon artist. Many of my young fans send in fantasy artwork as well and I love to hear their feedback and ideas for my new work.

Do you have a specific writing style?

I let the characters write the story and give them a gentle nudge here and there. It’s interesting when they go in a completely different direction to where I think we are headed, but the plot twists make it exciting, so I just go with it. ‘Flying by the seat of my pants’ writing is the only way to go for me.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Magic happens.

If you believe in something enough and work together to utilize your companions and resources to their full strength, then you can achieve anything. Sometimes it is the most unlikely person who can perform an extraordinary act of bravery to save the day.

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

No. I’ve yet to have my homeland invaded by laser-wielding Cyclops, thank goodness!

What authors have most influenced your life?

Tolkein, Eddings and Clive Cussler

What about them do you find inspiring?

The way they can all make the most incredible adventures believable and realistic. You leave reality at the door and buckle up for a roller-coaster ride of excitement. If I can give my readers that experience, then I consider my job well done.

If you had to choose, is there a writer would you consider a mentor?

No, I wouldn’t say a mentor, for I haven’t met any of my favourite authors. How cool that would be to have them pour over my first draft and make a few suggestions.

Who designed the cover of your book?

I employed a local spray paint artist to do the covers for the trilogy. His name is Scott Patterson and I really admire his work. He threw me a curve ball with the Dragon’s Revenge cover because he changed from spray paint to digital. I was a bit worried at first that the style would be different to the others, but I am really stoked with the end result. Some artists can do anything.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

Just the advice that I keep telling myself: remember to write every day. Life is so busy that you really have to make time for the things that matter. Oh, and find a good editor when you’re done. That’s very important too.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

I love to get feedback, so please do a review or send me a message to tell me know what you think of the Hunters of Reloria trilogy and what you would like me to write next. Always happy to oblige.

Book Cover Dragon's RevengeKasper Beaumont
near Brisbane, Australia

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Dragon’s Revenge – Book 3 in the Hunters of Reloria series

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Author Interview: Lauren Lynn

Lauren Lynne is a young adult author of action adventure, contemporary fantasy stories and an educator of children and adults. Please welcome her to No Wasted Ink.

Author Lauren LynneMy name is Lynne, Lauren Lynne and yep, I’m a James Bond fan. Seeing as how I’m not nearly as cool as the British secret agent, I write adventure stories. When I began writing it was intended for young adults but luckily for me my stories draw a much wider audience. I’m more than a published author. I’m also a certified teacher in Oregon and I work with students from kindergarten to adults. This last year I even started doing some technical editing but my passions will always be engaging readers in vibrant stories. I do more than just teach, write and edit. I love hanging out with my boys, our looney golden retriever and our array of cats. I’ve come to believe that “sucker” is tattooed on my forehead since we have four furry fosters at our house right now. So, when I’m not scooping cat boxes, I may be reading or taking scenic pictures.

When and why did you begin writing?

I started writing for fun in elementary school. As I’ve gotten older I can write a wider variety of things but as a kid growing up it was all fiction. I hated everything else.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I started a novel in college but I never did anything with it. I hope to revisit it, finish it and publish it. I was playing Dungeons and Dragons with my college buddies at the time so guess what the basis of that story is. I was definitely a writer by 2011 when I began in earnest on my journey to publication.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

My current work is to finish the fifth and final book in my Secret Watchers series. I have very mixed feelings as my time with Owen comes to an end. He has been a part of my life since 2011 and it will be hard to let him go. With the exception of the first book in the series I have not worked on only one book at a time so I am also working on a dystopian young adult novel and a children’s Christmas book.

What inspired you to write this book?

To talk about what inspired me to write Destiny, the last book in the Secret Watchers series, I have to go back to Visions, the first in the series. My life was in turmoil and I had the strong desire to make some changes. In real life there are some things we cannot change, so I invented a pretend world where I could decide what would happen. If I could not be the master of my own destiny for the moment, then I would control someone else’s.

Do you have a specific writing style?

I understand that it is unusual, but I very much like to put the reader right in the protagonist’s head. This style has its difficulties in that you can only show the reader what the protagonist literally sees, hears and experiences, but I feel that readers gain a closer connection.

How did you come up with the title of this book?

The final book in this series is Destiny. All the other titles had to do with how we experience our world (Visions, Whispers, Insights, and Perceptions). Visions are Owen’s special ability and now in this final book it is his Destiny that he must face.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

I’m a teacher. My first goal was to reach out to male reluctant readers. Through the years I have also witnessed a change in our students and so my second goal became to encourage them to be the best that they could be and to try to always do the right thing even if it’s hard.

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

The experiences in the book are from all around me. I am constantly writing down the way that someone says something to asking if I can use their story to weave into my own. When Owen split open his chin; it was inspired by my neighbor who had just done the same thing. The way Owen looks at the world is a little bit me but mostly my boys and our favorite characters from literature. When I write for Owen’s mom; it is exactly how I would talk to my boys.

What authors have most influenced your life? What about them do you find inspiring?

For me it is less about the author and more about the work. It is the characters they build that really speak to me. I read cozy mysteries and all kinds of young adult novels. One of my favorite series is Harry Potter by J.K. Rowling but I’m also a fan of Rick Riordan, Anthony Horowitz, Suzanne Collins, Cassandra Clare and Cleo Coyle. This eclectic collection has characters that move me and I can connect with.

If you had to choose, is there a writer would you consider a mentor? Why?

I would choose Rowling. I admire how she raised herself up from humble beginnings and seems to listen to her audience. She seems to be a likable person and I believe that is just as important as creating a good product.

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator?

I am published by BookBaby. I gave the design team a brief description of book one, color ideas and told them how much I liked a clock face they had used on another book. I also sent along a picture I had taken at Heceta Head, Oregon. Their first try was amazing and all I did was suggest a color change. Since then we have kept my picture from Hecta Head and the clock face because Owen’s watch is vital to the plot line. In the last three books we added outdoor pictures I took of local high school students. So who designed them? We did.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

Don’t give up and keep writing. Whatever we choose to do regularly, we get better at. Don’t expect to be a best seller in the first week your book comes out or even in the first year; that is something that only happens to a lucky few. Stay positive; our day in the sun will come. I’ve read several places that the best way to make money is to keep producing more works, so get going, I know you have something to say!

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Big hugs friends and follow your dreams. If there is a story in you, get out there and share it!

Book Cover VisionsLauren Lynne
Milwaukie, Oregon

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Visions (The Secret Watchers book one)

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