Tag Archives: writers

No Wasted Ink Writer’s Links

writers-linksMonday’s are my favorite day because it is when I share my links with you. This week has the usual general writing tips, but there is also a nice review about the editing tool Grammerly, a science fiction related essay about AI and an article about medical practices during the regency era. I hope you enjoy them!

Writing 5 Minutes A Day – How Much Can You Really Get Done?

Dialogue Writing Tips from Bartleby Snopes

Is Grammarly a Good Tool for Professional Writers?

Regency Medicine

Cory Doctorow: Skynet Ascendant

Writing in an accent: trouble ahead

The Ubiquitous Servant

FIRST LINE CATCHES THE READER

Want to Level Up Your Fiction? Take the “Dramatic Irony” Challenge!

5 tips for introverted writers

No Wasted Ink Writer’s Links

writers-linksAs I surf the net each week, I come across articles that I feel are helpful to either myself or to beginning authors. I like to share the cream of the crop with you all every Monday. This week’s batch has some interesting items, including a video about Victor Borge that will have grammar enthusiasts rolling on the floor.

How to write a series: 8 novice mistakes to avoid

AN OVERVIEW ON SCI-FI SUB-GENRES

Urban Fantasy

The Top 20 Publishers for New Authors

Are These Filter Words Weakening Your Fiction?

How to Become a Novelist

YOUTUBE: Victor Borge: Phonetic punctuation

You Kept Your Audiobook Rights – Now What?

5 TIPS FOR CRAFTING A MEMORABLE BOOK DESCRIPTION

The productivity trick one author used to write over 40 books

Author Interview: C. S. Marks

C.S. Marks prefers the classic epic tale, told in a slightly more contemporary voice. Her work may be read and enjoyed by all ages and on many levels of complexity, from the superficial action/adventure to the deep, thought-provoking level appreciated by the more serious and introspective reader. I’m honored to feature her on No Wasted Ink.

Author CS MarksI’m C.S. Marks, best known in the writing world for the Elfhunter trilogy. I hold a Ph.D. in Life Sciences, I am a life-long horsewoman and competitive long-distance rider, and I have spent the past 23 years as a Professor of Equine Science. My other interests include art, archery and bow-making, songwriting, and filk-singing. (I also have thirteen dogs on the farm. Ye gods.)

When and why did you begin writing?

I don’t remember when I first began writing; my dad was a Professor of Literature, and he instilled a love of words, reading, and writing at a very early age. Serious writing began the year he died suddenly…to fill a hole, I expect.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

I’ve just released Outcaste, which is the first in a new Alterran series. I’m currently working on the second in that series, entitled Anastasi. Also starting work on an unrelated novel.

What inspired you to write this book?

Let’s go back to the beginning, to Elfhunter.
Actually, it was the villain, Gorgon Elfhunter, who inspired me. His is a story that just needed to be told.

Do you have a specific writing style?

I probably do, but not sure how to describe it. As with any writer, it has evolved over the years. I like well-written narrative, I hate infodumps, I try to include enough description to fire the readers’ imaginations without overdoing it, and I love dialogue. Others have described my stuff as “Martin-esque with a bit of Stephen King influence.” I find that interesting, as I didn’t read anything of Mr. Martin’s until after the trilogy was long finished. My love for Tolkien is obvious, but my style is quite different.

How did you come up with the title of this book?

It is the story of Gorgon Elfhunter. There could be no other title. Sometimes the title of a book won’t reveal itself to me until the book is nearly finished, as was the case with Ravenshade.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

That is a vast question, and there are many ways to answer it, depending on the reader. Over the course of five novels, the “message” has developed with the story. If I had to condense it, it would concern themes of good and evil, love and hate—and what happens in between when the lines are blurred and the path is no longer clear. It would focus on the choices we make, which define our character, and that we are not at the mercy of circumstance if we choose to defy it and remain true to who we are. The newer series really focuses on the nature of prejudice, and how it may (or may not) be overcome.

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Yes, some are. The horses, for example, are all based on horses I either have owned or currently own. I have been told that I write some of the best horse characters in fantasy, which is not surprising considering my life-long obsession. There are countless other examples of events and characters based on experience…I’ll keep them to myself for now.

What authors have most influenced your life? What about them do you find inspiring?

I adore James Herriot. From him I learned to write what I know and tell my story from the heart. I admire Stephen King, who taught me the rules of writing and how to break them. I will always love Tolkien…the man who defines what epic fantasy is, and should be, at least to me.

If you had to choose, is there a writer would you consider a mentor? Why?

My dad would have been a great one. It is one of my greatest regrets that he did not live to see my work in print. He was editing my stuff since I was about eight years old; from him I learned to loathe exclamation points and not fear the occasional adverb.

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator?

Concept by me, artwork by Hope Hoover (Elfhunter) or John Connell (Fire-heart, Ravenshade, Outcaste). Hope and John were chosen for the quality of their work, and because they are willing to work in close cooperation with the author.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

Of course—don’t we all? In a few words, “Try to be realistic in your expectations, hire the best editor you can afford, and realize that not everyone will love your work…and that’s ok!”

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

You guys know how much I appreciate you. If you loved the Elfhunter trilogy, wait til you read Outcaste. And if you loved Outcaste, wait til Anastasi comes out. (You ain’t seen nothin’ yet.)

Book Cover ElfhunterC.S. Marks

FACEBOOK
GOODREADS
TWITTER

Elfhunter

Cover Artist: John Connell
Publisher: Parthian Press

AMAZON
SMASHWORDS

No Wasted Ink Writer’s Links

writers-linksEach week, I surf the internet to read articles about the craft of writing. Of these, I save the best I found and share them here with you. Welcome to No Wasted Ink and enjoy.

Putting Readers First – An Interview with Publishizer’s Founder Guy Vincent

Publishing: Has anything changed since the 19th century?

Neil Gaiman: How Stories Last

5 Stupid Grammar Rules You Should Never Follow Because They Make Your Writing Worse

PLANNING TO OUTLINE YOUR NOVEL? DON’T

How to build a book audience: 6 smart methods

Will Readers Find Your Protagonist Worthy?

The 4 Hidden Dangers of Writing Groups

Planning a Book Release Party

The Complete List of Creative Distractions and Defenses Against Them

No Wasted Ink Writer’s Links

writers-linksMondays are always my favorite because this is the day I am able to share the best of the articles that I have read for the week. There is lots of great stuff to read, so pour yourself a cup of coffee and enjoy yourselves.

Why All Authors May Have a “Hybrid” Future: Veteran Children’s Author Kristiana Gregory Goes Indie

“Let’s talk about genre”: Neil Gaiman and Kazuo Ishiguro in conversation

Creativity may be genetically linked with psychiatric disorders

The Strange Rise of the Writers’ Space

13 “Tells” of a Novice Writer

Stealing From Your Own Life: Your Way To A Storyline

Word for Writers, Part 4: The Review Tab — Viewing Options

Six Ways of Finding Great Ideas for Writing

Eyes On the Ground

Wish I’d Written That Years Ago