Author Interview: Tim Callahan

Author Tim Callahan is a writer of Space Opera and Superhero fiction with a bit of Science Fiction horror mixed in.  He is a member of the Dragon’s Rocketship Facebook Group.  

Author Tim CallahanHello, My name is Tim Callahan. I work in the IT department of Philadelphia Law firm. I’ve lived, and worked, in Philly most of my life and it’s a place I love. I’m married with two dogs, A pitbull-terrier named Jeffery (Named after a robot in a commercial I liked at the time we got him) and Cocker Spalie/ Black Lab mix named Kenseth. (Named after a race car driver.) Besides writing I enjoy reading, Football, Baseball, and vacationing with my wife.

When and why did you begin writing?

Started writing when I was a kid, probably around 11 or so. I always had way more imagination than smarts and would constantly act out in school, thinking that I saw a ghost or that aliens were going to come and take me away. I also loved to read. Mostly comic books but I eventually moved on to novels. There wasn’t a day where I didn’t have a book in my hand or I wasn’t tucked into a corner of the house reading something. It was during the idle times that the voices, who I later discovered were characters, would just tell me stories about themselves and what they were doing. Eventually, I realized the only way to shut them up was to write down what they were telling me. Didn’t take me long to realize how the act of writing not only shut them up, but it was also a lot of fun.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

When I finished my first book, at the age of 13 (It wasn’t a very good or long book.) Even though I didn’t know it at the time, it showed that I could start and finish a story I had written. That’s probably the hardest part for beginning writers, finishing, and it’s something I knew I could do at an early age.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

It’ll be the fifth book in my Evolutionite Chronicles books. Set in the city of Haven, which has the largest population of Evo’s, those born with special powers, it’s going to be about a powerful man with god-like powers returning after everything thought he was dead. A small group of Evo’s get together to try and stop him from destroying the world.

What inspired you to write this book?

My love of comic books and comic book stories. I can’t draw so writing is the best way to get those stories out there.

Do you have a specific writing style?

A lot of writers influenced my style but I really try to emulate the greats like Arthur C Clark, Robert Heinlein along with some of my new favorites, like Tim Pratt, Jim Butcher, and John Scalizi.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Don’t jump to judgment until you have all the information.

Are experiences in this book based on someone you
know or events in your own life?

All my books contain something I’ve experienced, either a feeling, a person, a conversation, or an actual event. In fact, this book will have a scene where a teacher punishes a child for flushing a grapefruit down a toilet in school. (I’m the kid being yelled at because I did that in first grade and flooded the bathroom)

Do you have any advice for other writers?

Probably nothing they haven’t heard before. Write every day. Write what you’d love to read. Don’t worry about what people think. Don’t even worry about what you think while writing. Trust your instinct. Sometimes your writing brain is ahead of your thinking brain and understands the story better than you do.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Keep doing what you love. It might not be writing, it might be drawing, it might be computers, it might be working on cars. I’m lucky in that I get to work on computers all day, something I’ve loved as much as writing, and I get to write when I’m at home. Long as you do what you love and you’ll always find happiness, even in dark times.

Dagger and Shadow Ninja HQ- resizeTimothy P. Callahan
Philadelphia, PA

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No Wasted Ink Writers Links

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Welcome to No Wasted Ink Writers Links on Monday. Each week I gather up articles that I find interesting as I surf the internet. Some are recently published and others go back a little way but are ones that I find relevant for writers. I hope you enjoy this week’s list.

When Should You Drop Your Story?

Writing Realistic Spiders

Diagnosing a REAL Writer: Do You Have Terminological Inexactitude Syndrome?

The Destructive Power of The Lie Your Character Believes

Easy Ways to Sell Signed Copies of Your Novel Online

Want to earn more as a book author? A male name will help

8 PRIDE AND PREJUDICE SEQUELS FOR THE DISCERNING JANE AUSTEN FAN

How to read poetry like a professor

Do the Doing: An Actor Writes

Poetry Rx: You Will Love Again the Stranger Who Was Your Self

Private Investigations in the Future by Meriah Crawford

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Photo by João Silas on Unsplash

I wear a lot of different hats (metaphorical hats, alas—I look dreadful in real ones), and one of those is that of a private investigator. I became a PI back in 2002 as part of an early midlife crisis, and did investigations full time for about three years. I’ve been a part-time PI ever since (sometimes very part time) but I keep my hand in because it’s such a fascinating gig. It also, like my college teaching job, sometimes gives me an opportunity to do good things in the world, like help people who the system doesn’t much care about. This work has given me a lot of opportunities to think about the role of private investigations and security in society, both now and in the future—and my love of sci-fi, as a reader, viewer, and writer, has offered me a different perspective on the subject than most will probably share. I hope this article will offer valuable information and insight for those interested in incorporating PIs and investigations in their own writing.

I first want to say: a lot of people have some major misconceptions about PI work. For example, a lot of people think it’s all online searches now. Databases and social media are definitely useful, but in fact, one of the complaints I’ve heard from lawyers over the years is that a lot of PIs don’t want to leave the office. They’d rather sit in front of a computer doing searches, or maybe make some phone calls. But there’s still so much you can gain from visiting locations and speaking with people in person. These things won’t completely change as time passes, though the amazing aerial and street-level imagery in Google Maps is already reducing the need to visit locations. I still catch many things that require a detailed look, or perhaps a sense of a place in the nighttime, or during rush hour.

I expect the spread of Skype and Facetime and other similar tools will also make interviewing people from afar more effective. But the best interviewing allows you to see the subject’s whole body to see posture, gestures, shifting, and so forth. And the people you most need to see in person are the ones who likely won’t agree to Skype with you, anyway, so again: in person is just better. Other technologies will have a big impact as time passes, though, including drones, tracking devices, and cameras. All of them are getting a lot smaller and more effective, as well as cheaper and easier to use.

Databases are an especially interesting conversation. There are many that PIs and other professionals have access to that the general public does not. Unfortunately, the data is often outdated. This was a problem for me on a recent case, due to people moving frequently and not providing a forwarding address, or simply using someone else’s address. As time passes, however, I expect the databases will become more accurate and up to date, and offer more types of data. To what extent depends on how much the government decides it needs to track us, how much we choose to offer our information freely on the web, and how effectively the data companies figure out how to collect that data.

There are also some really important laws that affect how I do my job, including federal laws like HIPAA, FCRA, FERPA, and state laws involving video and audio recording, and GPS tracking, among others. These laws will continue to evolve, and new laws will be passed. In particular, I expect there will be a lot more laws about online harassment and monitoring over the next few years, but law enforcement is always shockingly and sometimes devastatingly behind the times when it comes to technology. This will continue to be an issue. Likewise, when considering the longer-term future, laws around robots and sapient programs will be problematic in many serious ways.

Another, more interesting question (not everyone finds federal laws interesting, for some reason) is why and when people will hire PIs. The answer to this in practice is that, if you’re not getting justice through the system, a PI can be very helpful to get the information you need to either pressure law enforcement to take action or proceed through the civil courts. In the future, depending on the world we end up with (or the fictional world you build), this will depend on the availability, competence, and priorities of law enforcement, as well as on the extent and quality of the electronic monitoring systems. PIs will also need to become better at technology, analysis, and interviewing—though that’s true today as well. I will be surprised if PIs don’t become a lot more important in the future, but in a strong society with low poverty and effective policing, they should be a lot less necessary–and that’s a future I hope to see.


Meriah CrawfordMeriah Lysistrata Crawford is an associate professor at Virginia Commonwealth University, as well as a private investigator, writer, and editor. She has published short stories in several genres, a novella, essays, a variety of scholarly work, and two poems, and co-edited the anthology Trust and Treachery: Tales of Power and Intrigue. Her novel Persistence of Dreams, co-written with Robert Waters, will be released in 2018.

Meriah has an MFA in creative writing from the University of Southern Maine’s Stonecoast MFA program, and a PhD in literature and criticism from the Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

Her work as a PI, spanning over fifteen years, has included investigations of shootings, murders, burglary, insurance fraud, auto accidents, backgrounds, counterfeit merchandise, patent infringement, and missing persons. For more information about her work, including articles about writing, visit her website, connect on Twitter or Facebook.

 

 

Flashfiction: Sanctuary by Wendy Van Camp

Sanctuary

Sanctuary
A science fiction short story by Wendy Van Camp
255 words

“Bandit ship approaching.” Ship’s alarm sounds a warning. Sailors mind stations. Captain Alton Franks nods and grips his chair. Fifth attack this month. A captain had an obligation for his ship. No dying on his watch!

“Aim high off bandit bow. Only a warning shot.”

Midshipman Dustin Jacobs finds focus on bandit ship. Zap! Light zings through void. “Miss!”

“Good job, Midshipman.” What will occur now? Captain waits.

Lights flash on bandit ship. Rust. Black. Grassy. Black. It was a quiz for Captain Franks to work out.

“May I board?” Bandit sounds without warning on comm. It was a woman.

“Who asks?” Captain Franks said.

“I am Laura Quinn, Captain of this Martian Ship Lucidity. I wish to bargain with you.”

“You may board without arms.” Captain Franks nods to Midshipman Jacobs. Midshipman jaunts to airlock with gun on hip. Laura Quinn is brought to Captain’s public room.  A sailor stands guard.

“Sit down,” bids Captain Franks, pointing to a chair. Bandit Quinn sits.

Standing, Captain Franks points a digit at bandit. “Fifth attack this month. Why? What do you want?”

Laura Quinn is nonvocal at first. “Sanctuary from Mars. For my bandits and I. I did no wrong, but carry disfavor.” Quinn said softly.

“Political affair?” Quinn nods. This shifts opinion for Captain Franks, known minor acts can bring about political disfavor on Mars. Pity stirs him.

“I proposition sanctuary onboard USS Goliath.” An alluring grin of Laura Quinn, upon his proclamation, stirs Alton Franks. A worthy mission than thought of at start of his tour.


Sanctuary is a flash fiction from a challenge in one of my science fiction writing groups back in 2016.  We were to write a story without using the letter “e”.  This is not as easy as you might think.  The vowel appears in a great many words in the English language.  I thought mine turned out pleasant enough for a micro-flash.  I hope you will agree!

This story is also available to members of Medium.  If you would like to support me as an author, please go to Medium and give my story claps.  Clapping lets the Medium system know that my story is popular and it will gain more visibility.

No Wasted Ink Writers Links

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Welcome to another Monday of writers links!  This week I have a nice assortment of general writing links, a little bit on marketing your work, and an interesting article about AI in publishing.  Enjoy!

Writing Realistic Forests: Tell the Wood from the Trees

Why Publish Your Novel with a Traditional Publisher?

Want to Make Your Scenes Come Alive? Here’s a Cop’s-Eye View

Branding & The Brain: How Social Media Changes but Humans Never Will

How To Keep Writing When That Critical Inner Voice Won’t Shut Up

Where Does Your Novel’s Conflict Come From?

Women Intellectuals and the Art of the Withering Quip

Artificial Intelligence in Publishing

The 7 Habits Of Highly Creative People

Thirty Minutes a Day is All It Takes to Automate Your Social Media Activity, But I Don’t Recommend it

Author Interviews * Book Reviews * Essays * Writer's Links * Scifaiku

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