No Wasted Ink Writers Links

Welcome to No Wasted Ink Writers Links. Each Monday I post a list of top ten writing articles that I have found interesting or useful during my surfing on the internet. I hope you enjoy reading the articles as much as I did.

How to Know Which Parts of Your Story Readers Will Like Best (It Isn’t Always What You Think)

Tips for Using Instagram as an Author

A Simple Trick to Increase Your Productivity

Finding Our WHY: The Beating Heart That Keeps Our Muse ALIVE

Five Epic Fantasy Conflicts Other Than War

History for Fantasy Writers: Journeymen

Identifying your Character’s Fatal Flaw

Writing Tips: 6 Ways To Give Perfectionism The Boot

You Should Quit Writing: Coexisting with the Naysayers in Your Head

Do I Need a Platform and If So, How High?

No Wasted Ink Writers Links

Happy Monday!  It is time for another top ten writing article links here on No Wasted Ink.  This week I have a great selection of general writing tips for you, including a few for writers of fantasy that should prove to be useful.  Enjoy!

Writing Women Characters Into Epic Fantasy Without Quotas

How to Make Your Reader Care About Your Characters

23 Tips for a Zero Waste Home Office

How To Create A Vivid Experience With Setting Descriptions

16 Concrete Tips for Effectively Editing Your Own Fiction

On Writing: Why Mastery Should Matter to the Serious Author

Is My Villain Who Feeds Off Negative Emotions Problematic?

Mythic Guide to Heroes & Villains — The Fatal Flaw and Unlikely Heroes

How To Challenge Toxic Masculinity As A Writer

Where Do Character Strengths Come From?

No Wasted Ink Writers Links

Happy Halloween! This Monday I have writing links of a somewhat ghoulish nature. LOL Actually, don’t let the titles of these articles fool you. All of them are chock full of great writing tips for authors. Stay safe during your trick or treat hours! And keep on writing.

THE GRIMOIRE: A NOT-SO-SPOOKY NOTEBOOK IDEA

Writing’s Secret Formula: How to Write Stories That Matter

How to Self-Publish and Market a Book: KEYWORDS

Can Writers Lose Their Fingerprints?

Thirteen Reasons Writers are Mistaken for Serial Killers

Five Ways to Handle Parents Without Killing Them

Collaborative Writing in a Shared World

Give Your Readers Someone to Hate

A Novelist’s Necessary Evils

10 Edgar Allan Poe Quotes for Writers and About Writing

Author Interview: Chris J. Breedlove

I asked Author Chris Breedlove what his motto for being a writer was.  He answered:

A Writer is…
A humble, receptive student and negotiator
But the heart that beats within his/her breast
Is a determined savage
Unfamiliar with surrender

Please welcome this savvy science fiction author to No Wasted Ink.

My name is Chris Harold Stevenson and I’m 67 years young. I go by the pen name Christy J. Breedlove for my YA books and stories. Yes, I changed gender entirely. That’s another story.

My early writing accomplishment were multiple hits within a few years: In my first year of writing back in 1987, I wrote three SF short stories that were accepted by major slick magazines which qualified me for the Science Fiction Writers of America, and at the same time achieved a Finalist award in the L. Ron Hubbard Writers of the Future Contest. This recognition garnered me a top gun SF agent at the time, Richard Curtis Associates. My first novel went to John Badham (Director) and the producers, the Cohen Brothers. Only an option, but an extreme honor. The writer who beat me out of contention for a feature movie was Michael Crichton’s Jurassic Park. My book was called Dinothon.

A year after that I published two best-selling non-fiction books and landed on radio, TV, in every library in the U.S. and in hundreds of newspapers.

I have been trying to catch that lightning in a bottle ever since. My YA dystopian novel, The Girl They Sold to the Moon won the grand prize in a publisher’s YA novel writing contest, went to a small auction and got tagged for a film option. So, My latest release is Sceamcatcher: Web World, and it’s showing some promise. I’m getting there, I hope!

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I considered myself a writer when I published the two shorts in Amazing Stories magazine. I actually considered myself an author after my first non-fiction book was published and hit the media. It seems I had to have legitimate credits in order to claim such status.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

I can give you the basic summary, or the extended blurb:

When seventeen-year-old Jory Pike cannot shake the hellish nightmares of her parent’s deaths, she turns to an old family heirloom, a dream catcher. Even though she’s half-blood Chippewa, Jory thinks old Native American lore is so yesterday, but she’s willing to give it a try. However, the dream catcher has had its fill of nightmares from an ancient and violent past. After a sleepover party, and during one of Jory’s most horrific dream episodes, the dream catcher implodes, sucking Jory and her three friends into its own world of trapped nightmares. They’re in an alternate universe—locked inside of an insane web world filled with murders, beasts, and thieves. How can they find the center of the web where all good things are allowed to pass? Where is the light of salvation? Are they in hell?

What inspired you to write this book?

It all started with a dream catcher. This iconic item, which is rightfully ingrained in Indian lore, is a dream symbol respected by the culture that created it. It is mystifying, an enigma that that prods the imagination. Legends about the dream catcher are passed down from multiple tribes. There are variations, but the one fact that can be agreed upon is that it is a nightmare entrapment device, designed to sift through evil thoughts and images and only allow pleasant and peaceful dreams to enter into the consciousness of the sleeper.

I wondered what would happen to a very ancient dream catcher that was topped off with dreams and nightmares. What if the nightmares became too sick or deathly? What if the web strings could not hold any more visions? Would the dream catcher melt, burst, vanish, implode? I reasoned that something would have to give if too much evil was allowed to congregate inside of its structure. I found nothing on the Internet that offered a solution to this problem—I might have missed a relevant story, but nothing stood out to me. Stephen King had a story called Dream Catcher, but I found nothing in it that was similar to what I had in mind. So I took it upon myself to answer such a burning question. Like too much death on a battlefield could inundate the immediate location with lost and angry spirits, so could a dream catcher hold no more of its fill of sheer terror without morphing into something else, or opening up a lost and forbidden existence. What would it be like to be caught up in another world inside the webs of a dream catcher, and how would you get out? What would this world look like? How could it be navigated? What was the source of the exit, and what was inside of it that threatened your existence? Screamcatcher: Web World, the first in the series, was my answer. I can only hope that I have done it justice.

Do you have a specific writing style?

I’m a fruit salad of other known writer’s influences. Oh, like what I consider stylists: Poul Anderson, Virgin Planet, Peter Benchley, The Island and Jaws, Joseph Wambaugh, The Onion Field and Black Marble, Michael Crichton, Jurassic Park, Alan Dean Foster, Icerigger trilogy, and some Stephen King. Anne Rice impresses with just about anything she has written. I think it’s the humor and irony that attracts me the most–and it’s all character-related

How did you come up with the title of this book?

After I had the idea/premise for the book, having researched similar works, if any, I found that I had something very unique. It dawned on me to name the book Screamcatcher since it was a play on words and it sounded impactful. Again, I researched that word and only found that it was used in a short story about a kid having a tooth extraction. I knew then that I was home free. I was continuously complimented by all of the publishers and editors who saw the title. It’s the first book in the series, and I have sub-titles for the other two as well, which are sold and just about ready for editing.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

I’m not very heavy-handed when it comes to delivering messages in my books. I want to avoid any preaching at all costs. I do include the basic/standard survival, loyalty, courage and persistence themes in my young characters, as well as emotional growth and cooperation. I did hide, or rather include, a very deep and subtle message in the story that I think most will gloss over or not recognize altogether. And that is my belief that sometimes the nice guy finishes first and gets the gal. I wanted something that swerved away from the controlling, domineering alpha male that is so often seen in other works of YA and romance. I wanted a slow burn sweet romance that was touching. Quite a few reviewers recognized this message and I got kudos for it. That was a RELIEF.

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

The main character Jorlene (Jory) is named after my sister. Although she does not resemble the FMC physically, she does so in an emotional sense. Her boyfriend, Choice Daniels, is named after my great-nephew. All of my books contain the names of my extended family members. And there are parts of them that show through in the personalities of the fictional characters.

What authors have most influenced your life? What about them do you find inspiring?

Other than those stylists mentioned above, I had direct contact with members of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. Alan Dean Foster, Richard Curtis, Robert Bloch, Bob Heinlein, Clive Barker, and others. From their Youtube instruction videos and articles, JK Rowling, Anne Rice, and Stephen King have inspired me tremendously with their no-nonsense attitude about hammering those keys in spite of depression, lack of motivation or pure laziness.

If you had to choose, is there a writer would you consider a mentor? Why?

That honor would go to Poul Anderson who wrote back to me habitually and gave me guidance in the industry when I needed it the most. He took out his valuable time to befriend me and answer so many questions. Can you tell I’m a dinosaur yet?

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator?

Carlone Andrus of Melange Books, Fire & Ice YA division rendered the cover after reading the book. I had a different idea in mind, but she absolutely nailed it. The compliments have never stopped coming. Most of the plot is revealed on the cover but you would have to search very hard to put it all together.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

Watch your spending on ads–they can be grossly ineffective. Use social media and generously interact with fellow writers and readers. Don’t abuse FB and Twitter solely for the purpose of “Buy My Book.” Join writing groups and learn from the pros. Ask politely for reviews–don’t pressure, harass or intimidate. Be creative. Target your genre readers. Offer incentives and freebies. Craft a newsletter and send it out bi-monthly. Don’t take critiques as personal attacks–learn from honest opinions. Don’t despair. Never give up. Revenge query. I run a writer’s advocate blog and I pull no punches.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

If you think that you’ve had it tough, I recommend you watch Magic Beyond Words, the life story of Joanne Kathleen Rowling. Books just don’t happen. They are nurtured and raised from infancy, just like a budding writer is. This business might quit you, but you cannot quit the business. Stay active and attentively writing.

Chris J. Breedlove
Sylvania, Alabama

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Screamcatcher: Web World

Cover Artist: Caroline Andrus
Publisher: Melange Books, LLC

AMAZON
BARNES & NOBLE
KOBO

No Wasted Ink Writers Links

Happy Monday! It is time for another round of writing links here on No Wasted Ink. This week I have a great bunch of writing craft articles for you. Some are for all writers and others for writers of fantasy and science fiction. I hope you find them to be useful! There is one article about rape and fiction that does contain situations of a sensitive nature. I believe the message of how to change this trope for today’s readers is important to consider, which is why it is included.

Conscience Place and Story Mind

WRITING ABOUT MUSIC IS LIKE…

5 Questions for Choosing a Protagonist Who Represents Your Story’s Theme

Back to the Basics

Narrative Drive – Do You Have It?

Motive: The Key to Writing Stories Readers Can’t Put Down

Six Rape Tropes and How to Replace Them

So, You Want to Be a Writer?

Writing Tips: Using Visual Inspiration For Your Stories

How to Ground (and Hook) Readers in Your Opening Scene

Author Interviews * Book Reviews * Essays * Writer's Links * Scifaiku

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