All posts by Wendy Van Camp

Author * Poet * Illustrator

The Curate’s Brother by Wendy Van Camp

The Curate’s Brother: A Jane Austen Variation of Persuasion
by Wendy Van Camp

Available on Amazon

A Regency Historical based off the characters and settings from Jane Austen’s novel Persuasion.  It can serve as a stand-alone or a prequel to Austen’s book.


It is the summer of 1806 in Somerset, England.

EDWARD WENTWORTH, a young curate, is surprised by the arrival of his brother, Commander Frederick Wentworth, the “hero of San Domingo”, who is on shore leave from his battles in the Napoleonic wars and has come to spend time with the only family he has in England.

All the good Commander wants to do is flirt and dance with the ladies until he is called back to sea, but when his flirting extends to SALLY MARSHALL, an outgoing beauty that Edward always disdained as “a child”, the curate becomes aware that his opinion of Sally is sorely outdated. Meanwhile, Frederick becomes drawn to shy wallflower ANNE ELLIOT. She is the daughter of a baronet and above his station, but Frederick pays no heed to his brother’s warnings that class may prevent their union.

At the end of summer, a letter and package arrive that will change everything for the two brothers. Which will prevail? The bold action of the commander or the quiet manners of the curate?

A Primer on Speculative Poetry by Kimberly Nugent

When Wendy approached me about writing an article for “No Wasted Ink,” I was thrilled and immediately began to waffle about which idea to put to digital paper. Despite a career in editing, I kept coming back to a topic about which both Wendy and I are passionate, speculative poetry. Genre poetry has a lovely community of poets, and a thriving market for both paid and unpaid submissions.

Like a lot of creators, I had a long break from poetry until editing an e-zine that featured speculative poetry. I was fascinated and thrilled! So, I began writing again. Whether you are returning to poetry, looking for a change in your existing poetry, or would like to write for the first time, I have a few tips for writing in general, and a few specific to speculative poetry.

Keep a notebook. This notebook can be a 99-cent special or something bound in leather, but whatever you pick, keep it with you. And keep your favorite writing implement in stock. Keep pencils in your car, pens in your purse, grab some markers, something that will make a mark. I previously kept notes digitally but have since switched back to physical writing. Not only do you not have to worry about backups or where you saved that file, you will find the thought required to put words on paper also puts contemplation into your ideas and word choices.

Write. Just write in that lovely notebook. It can be anything from words and phrases to outlines and perhaps even a rough draft. But don’t worry about form—yet. The goal here is just to create the words that will build your poetry. Feel free to be wordy. Write in the margins, make notes. The more words in your notebook, the easier to compose your verses. Also, I find inspiration in various media, especially scientific articles and lectures! Your muse can be anywhere, so be sure to jot down all your ideas.

Buy a good form reference book. Now that you have those lovely thoughts and phrases, combine them into the forms that feel natural to the ideas when writing your final poem. I suggest buying at least one (or more!) form reference books. Two of my favorites are “The Prosody Handbook: A Guide to Poetic Form” by Beum and Shapiro and “The Book of Forms” by Turco. The more you write and create, the more you should challenge yourself and step outside your comfort zone. If you generally write a sonnet, try an epic poem or haiku! What specifically sets speculative poetry apart is the topic. The is sky is NOT the limit! Putting the fantastical, science fiction, and even mythological themes into form (and yes, you can include free verse) is what will set you apart from flash fiction and the short story.

After you write your poetry, always let it sit overnight before you make any changes. Like prose writing, a little distance between yourself and the words will make the editing process easier. Now is also the time to share your work with a trusted listener or reader. Your sounding board should give both praise and constructive feedback.

Your edits are complete, your trusted evaluator has appraised your efforts, and you are ready to submit your first poem! But, where? The largest poetry-only markets typically shy away from genre poetry, however, there are organization specifically for the speculative poet. The Science Fiction & Fantasy Poetry Association (SFPA) and Horror Writers Association are both excellent resources for a genre poet. Also, look for publications and journals that are focused on certain forms in addition to genre-specific publications.

When you have decided on a market, read the submission guidelines carefully. Always follow their directions and pay close attention to if the market accepts simultaneous submissions or those that have been previously published. I also highly recommend you keep a log of your submissions so you can keep track of where you place your poems, and which publications you should follow up with.

The most important thing after submitting your work is to congratulate yourself! Whether your first submission or your 100th is your first published poem, creating a work you can be proud to submit is an accomplishment in itself.


Kimberly Nugent lives near the beautiful Sandia Mountain range and edits speculative fiction and RPGs. She spends her free time with her family, cats, and various nerdy hobbies! You can find her on Twitter at @BlueTeaEditing

No Wasted Ink Writers Links

What is a Monday without a top ten list of writer’s articles to peruse?   The majority of these are general writing tips, just the thing to help you get revved up for a new year of writing.  Enjoy!

WHY YOU SHOULD FLASH YOUR FICTION

What is a rite of passage?

Organic World-building Through Ecology

KEEP READING!

Critique: 10 Ways to Write a Better First Chapter Using Specific Word Choices

Voice: What is Writing ‘Voice’ & Why is It Important to Storytelling?

Taming Your Exposition

Blood for Money: The Origins of the Mercenary

3 Steps To Writing Diverse Characters

5 Ways to Quiet Your Inner Editor

Happy New Year From No Wasted Ink

Happy New Year from No Wasted Ink!

As 2019 closes, I am left with feelings of amazement and determination. I found focus and finished the poetry collection I had been working on and off for the past four years. It published last October and I’m pleased with how it turned out. I also had a great time at several science fiction conventions and an awesome writing conference this past fall. Thank you to all who I connected with this past fall. You all inspire me.

Winter is always a time of reflection and of prioritizing projects.  2020 is no exception. There will be a few changes to No Wasted Ink this year.  I have decided to scale back my posting to only twice a week instead of three times a week.  The posts will be more focused on writing and less on graphics, with the exception of my illustrated scifaiku.

I am going to be posting my newsletter once a month instead of being quarterly.  The newsletter with feature news of my writing progress, links to the various places where my work publishes in addition to No Wasted Ink, and recommendations of books I’m reading. From time to time, there will also be giveaways. If you are interested in what is going on behind the computer screen, the newsletter is where you should be.

No Wasted Ink will continue to feature my top ten lists, author interviews, my articles, my illustrated scifaiku poems, and guest posts about the craft of writing or posts of interest to science fiction/fantasy readers.  Instead of spending time on filler blog posts, I would rather put the time toward creating new books, short stories, and poetry.  It is time for a new direction in my writing.

Thank you all for following along here at No Wasted Ink, my little home on the internet. There are over 1000 posts on the blog, going back six or seven years. I never thought that I’d be writing this blog for as long as I have, but it has been worth it to me and I hope that you have also found the blog to be of some small value.

Enjoy the New Year!  May it prove to be rewarding and prosperous to us all.

No Wasted Ink Writers Links

As we wind down to the end of the year, I want to thank you for being a part of the No Wasted Ink family.  It has been a pleasure to be a part of your reading habit and I am grateful for all my readers.  Never fear, No Wasted Ink is continuing forward into 2020. I hope you’ll join me for another year. Now, onto the top ten links!

Mistakes Many Writers Make

Nine Ways for Your Hero to Earn the Clues They Need

Prepare for Public Speaking Like a Pro

Promote Your Book with Local Collaborations

The Secret Society of Women Writers in Oxford in the 1920s

“The impact will be immense”: How AI is reshaping the publishing industry

How to Deal with your Writing Anxiety: 6 Smart Tips that Work

The Fun of Pantsing

Lost in Iceland: Searching for a Better Writing Process

How to Transform Exposition and Summary into Scene