Category Archives: Author Interviews

Author Interview: Jennifer Ponce

Author Jen Ponce is a self-proclaimed pantser, which means she follows the story to see where it goes. That’s the fun of writing for her—going on an adventure with her characters into worlds unknown! An inspiration for all us authors, to be sure! Please welcome her to No Wasted Ink.

Author Jen PonceHey, my name is Jen Ponce. I’m a lover of all things creative and enjoy dabbling with lots of different things: crochet, drawing, embroidery, knitting, painting, beadwork, woodwork, sewing, etc … I’m a Jane of all trades but mistress of none, so to speak. I have three great boys, three cats, and a pleco called Mali.

When and why did you begin writing?

I started writing long, long ago because I’ve always had stories running through my head. I used to put on puppet shows for my family—I wrote the plays myself and then performed them when I was 10ish. My best friend in grade school and I used to create elaborate stories and act them out with our Barbie dolls. When it got too embarrassing to haul the Barbies around, we started writing the stories instead.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I thought of myself as a writer once my friend and I started putting our stories down on paper. They became more than playtime; suddenly, I saw the potential of the written word in a way I hadn’t before.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

Burning the Devil is a dark contemporary romance about a poor mechanic named Gwen and a mysterious actor named Neo.

What inspired you to write this book?

Like 90% of my books, in came in a fervor dream. I was so intrigued by the idea that, when I woke up, I started writing. That was almost ten years ago and the book doesn’t much resemble the dream I had except where it counts—the slow descent into darkness.

Do you have a specific writing style?

I love stories that drive forward and that’s how I tend to write. I don’t like long, descriptive scenes or wandering prose, and so I avoid those things as much as I can in my own work.

How did you come up with the title of this book?

I had a hard time naming this book. It was first called Gates of the Phoenix and later changed to Burning the Devil when multiple rewrites made the first title nonsensical.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Yes. I want people to question how they fall in love. I want them to think about what they will and won’t accept in their own relationships. I want them to question how well they vet people they meet.

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know or events in your own life?

I work as an advocate for people who’ve experienced sexual and domestic violence, so I always write about relationships and what can go wrong. (Even when I don’t mean to!) I think it’s important to showcase what violent relationships look like and help readers identify red flags.

What authors have most influenced your life? What about them do you find inspiring?

Stephen King has always been an influence. I find his writing absorbing and thought-provoking—plus I always love a good scare.
There are many romance writers that I love, too, Jennifer Crusie, Julia Quinn, Johannah Lindsey to name a tiny few. I find their passion for their stories to be invigorating and inspiring and I was inspired to write because of the romance books I read when I was younger. I don’t write much romance now, but I still am proud of the foundation of knowledge I gained from reading all those love stories.

If you had to choose, is there a writer would you consider a mentor? Why?

On Writing, by Stephen King was the book that inspired me to finish my first novel on my own. Until then, I’d only written with my friends. His book gave me the creative umph to kick my own butt and get it done. It’s funny because most of the books he recommends reading I just think are awful. But he inspires me!

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator?

I designed this cover. I had an idea in mind that fit with the book and the character and figured I could make it come to life.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

Read widely. Consume writing books. Offer to beta read for other authors. Practice. Practice. Practice. Don’t expect others to answer all your questions or do your work for you.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

I’m a reader too. I love books that are exciting, adventurous, and meaningful. That’s what I try to write, too. The beauty of today is the endless possibilities, book-wise. We have choices and that’s the most amazing thing … that and the instant gratification of downloading a book from Amazon and starting to read it all within seconds.

Burning the DevilJen Ponce
Alliance, NE

FACEBOOK
TWITTER
GOODREADS

Burning the Devil

AMAZON

Author Interview: Robert J Franks

Author Robert Franks is eccentric, geeky, and currently rebelling noisily about approaching the age of 50 far too rapidly. Please welcome him here on No Wasted Ink.

Author Bob FranksMy name’s Robert Franks. I’m currently 49 going on 15. I’m a huge geek for anything to do with fantasy, superheroes or science fiction, and world mythology. I live in Darlington, England, and work full-time as an assistant manager in a budget shop.

When and why did you begin writing?

I’ve always had a love of writing and wrote my first fantasy novel at the age of fifteen. Reading it now it’s cringe-worthy! But some of the characters I created all those years ago stuck with me, and when I was made redundant in 2009, I found once again my love of writing, and they re-emerged in The Glass Apple.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I can pin it down to two occasions: the first was sitting at my parents’ dining table (I was a regular visitor when I was unemployed), surrounded by research books and various scraps of paper with little snippets of dialogue and plotlines scribbled on them. I remember going to make a coffee and coming back and realizing: “Wow. I’m actually working. For me!”

The second was when I received my first reviews on Amazon. There was something just so thrilling about that. Like a child waking up on Christmas morning!

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

The book follows the adventures of Ethelbert Gobswistle, an elderly gentleman with memory problems. He has a rather quaint Texan accent but speaks like an English Butler. He also, though he has little memory of this, used to be Merlin. He still has his Anguinum (Druid Stone) – the Glass Apple of the title. He becomes the caretaker of his three grandchildren; Jason (11), Kylie (10) and little Anna, who is 4, after their mother has a heart attack while driving.

He has a nemesis. The Medb (Pronounced Mave). She has a history similar to Gobswistle, but whereas Gobswistle always tried to do good, the Medb always sought power, and control, and more than anything, she sought Gobswistle’s Anguinum.

What inspired you to write this book?

My love of world mythology. Reading up I found it interesting how many different mythologies and religions had a very similar basic structure of an old man teaching peace. And a lot of mythologies had hints of magical travel and portals. So in the first instance, I created Ethelbert. He is 7000 years old. He no longer remembers anything from his childhood – his parents, his origins or anything – but he kind of remembers being Merlin. And Myrrdin. And Lailoken. And Michael Scott. The Compte de St Germaine is in there somewhere, as is John Dee. In fact, if you think of any wizard/Wise Man or halfway decent conjuror in history, it was probably Gobswistle.

And in the second instance, I created The Portal, an old scifi and fantasy trope I admit, but great fun too. It means I can put my characters at any point in history. I love including Easter Eggs in the books in the form of names or situations. If people aren’t into them it doesn’t affect the story at all, but it (hopefully) adds something to look up the meanings of the names of various characters or to realize an event/war/location actually existed.

Do you have a specific writing style?

I like writing humour, and this forms a great part of the books. It’s not heavy prose – I wanted something that anyone could dive into and enjoy. I don’t aim for slapstick comedy though, and there are chapters that are very dark. Hopefully, the two balance each other out.

How did you come up with the title of this book?

When I used to smoke, I had a green Murano Glass Apple ashtray. I thought it was beautiful and quite quirky looking. I don’t know what influenced me to use it, but it became (in my mind at least) a perfect representation of Merlin’s Druid Stone.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

I guess, if I had to say there was a message in the books, it’s to accept people for who they are. Because the mythologies used in the book come from very diverse cultures I’ve used people from those cultures to help inhabit the stories. Whether people are black, white, ochre, or sky-blue pink with yellow polka dots, they’re still people.

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Honestly? All my family, friends and the occasional work colleague has helped to shape the characters in this book. I just haven’t told them yet … Shhh!

What authors have most influenced your life? What about them do you find inspiring?

You’ve made me think about answering this one! Okay, there are three authors that have inspired me, from three different decades. And yet the reason they inspired me is very much the same. The authors are:
Armistead Maupin, J K Rowling and Jim Butcher.

They inspired me because they write such well fleshed-out characters and because they can find humor in the darkest of situations. Humor is a survival tool, and so many authors forget this.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

The hardest thing about writing is that first minute you sit down in front of your desk to write. Procrastination, and that little voice that whispers ‘you know you’ll never do it’ are the two biggest obstacles you’ll ever have to overcome.

Believe me, those dishes CAN wait!

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

If you like action-adventure, magic, comedy, time-travel, and the occasional cliffhanger, you’ll like The Glass Apple!

 

Book Cover The Glass AppleRobert J Franks
Darlington, England

FACEBOOK

The Glass Apple

AMAZON

Author Interview: Hannah Steenbock

Hannah Steenbock is a German writer of Speculative Fiction. She uses both her native German and English as languages for her tales, as she loves English and tends to think in that language when plotting Fantasy. She lives and works in Kiel, the northernmost state capital of Germany. Her other pastimes include strolling along beaches, talking with trees, and devouring as many stories as time allows. I’m honored to introduce her here on No Wasted Ink.

Author Hannah SteenbockI’m Hannah Steenbock. I’m German, living in Germany, but writing in English, mostly. I’m 50+, and I wear many hats: I work part-time in a civil service job, I run a small practice as therapist and coach, and of course, I write.

When and why did you begin writing?

I wrote fan fiction as a kid. But I seriously started writing in January 2000. I know this so well because it was such an exciting experience to start writing out a scene stuck in my head and finding that I did 30 pages of work before even getting to it – and the whole thing eventually built into several novel-sized adventures of my fantasy hero and heroine. Those novels need a lot of work before I’ll publish them, but they were the beginning of my writing career.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I got my first outside validation by signing a contract with an agent in 2004, on the strength of the first novel in that fantasy series. That was when I thought I might actually be good enough. They didn’t sell a single book, and I ended the contract five years later… and then started self-publishing.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

I’m going to talk about “Dorelle’s Journey”, the first book in my Cloud Lands Saga. That’s the first series I wrote about dragons, even though I’ve been in love with dragons since I discovered Pern in the school library during my exchange year in California. It took me that long to write dragons… I was always afraid that it would be called a copy of Anne McCaffrey.

I love Dorelle because she’s an independent woman, firm in her beliefs and her love of her dragon. And she’s willing to risk her life for others. In the book, I challenge her a lot… and she came through it all with flying colors. So did her dragon.

What inspired you to write this book?

#takes a deep breath#

Originally, I started out writing a novel with three different main characters, and three different timelines. They were supposed to meet in the Cloud Lands (that’s one large area in my world) and turn from enemies to friends. I got stuck on that one… ( it’s the base for my second series that will be called The Cloud Lands Wars, though.)
Even so, my mind stayed in that world, and I found a shorter story about how the Cloud Lands actually were discovered – basically a generation or so before that ill-fated novel. And the result is “Dorelle’s Journey”.

Do you have a specific writing style?

I don’t think so, to be honest. But most of my stories are “feel-good” stories. I see so much destruction and darkness in the world around us that I don’t need to put that into my stories. It’s unlikely you’ll see anything dystopian by me.

How did you come up with the title of this book?

I thought about it. 😉 No, seriously, most of my titles are just short descriptions of what happens in the books. And in this one, Dorelle takes a heck of a journey – and back. I try to make my titles short and powerful, though.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Yes, there is. Underlying the whole struggle in the series – Dorelle’s trouble with her Wing Commander and everything else – is the big question: How do we treat our dragons? They are an intelligent species, but their abilities are not valued everywhere, beyond their flying and fighting. There is a lot of discrimination going on. In this case, it’s speciism, and not racism, but the result is very similar. There are similarities to slavery…

What authors have most influenced your life? What about them do you find inspiring?

Anne McCaffrey, for introducing me to dragons and amazing worlds. Pern was my favorite, but I read most of her books. Rosemary Sutcliff and Judith Tarr, for their writing style. Both know how to pack an emotional punch with few words. Even with simple words. I adore that ability. And I adore Judy’s Lippizans. Rita Mae Brown, when she described why she wrote “Riding Shotgun”: She was stuck in a cabin with nothing new to read, so she sat down and wrote what she wanted to read. Isn’t that powerful?

If you had to choose, is there a writer would you consider a mentor? Why?

I don’t really want a mentor for writing. I guard my own voice. I want it to be me, not a watered-down version of someone else. When I’m writing intensely, I don’t even read fiction. However, I would love to learn marketing and fan interaction from Hugh Howey. #laughs#

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator?

The cover design is by Ashley Fontainne. I used to be in an FB group with her, and when I wanted new covers for the series before publishing the last part, I realized she had been doing covers for a while. I like hers – they are dynamic and dramatic, so it was an easy choice. Working with her was very awesome and totally easy.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

Write. Stop reading writing advice. Stop taking the next writing class. Sit down and write. Write more. Publish what you write.
And learn about the trade. Learn copyright. Learn grammar, spelling, pacing – by reading lots. Soak up the language of your genre. So read and write. Very basic.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

I love you all. I’m so grateful you’re reading my books, and I love hearing from you, too. I’m an avid reader myself, I know all the joy that comes from books – and I hope I can feed that joy for you.

Dorrelle - Ebook_D2DHannah Steenbock
Kiel, Germany

FACEBOOK
GOODREADS
TWITTER

Dorelle’s Journey

Cover Artist: Ashley Fontainne

AMAZON
BARNES & NOBLE
KOBO
iTUNES

Author Interview: S.A. Gibson

Author S.A. Gibson has five books and several short stories set in a future where modern technology has been lost. All his stories are suitable for a wide range of ages, from 5th grade on up. Please welcome him to No Wasted Ink.

Author SA GibsonGrowing up in Southern California, I have held many jobs over the years, computer tech, administrative support, community organizing, and book writing. After years of work, I returned to school to study for a Ph.D. in education. For the last several years, I have been publishing academic articles, books, and book chapters. I am looking a what qualities make individual good teachers, under difficult conditions and low pay. I now live with my spouse and a small dog, working on school work and fiction stories.

When and why did you begin writing?

From childhood to the present, I have been reading huge numbers of science fiction stories and books. Finally, by the 2010s I was finding it difficult to find more of the books that I wanted to read. I sometimes would read more than 2 books a week. I wasn’t able to find as many of the stories that would keep me up all night, that I desired. So I decided to write a story I would want to read. My first fiction book was A Dangerous Way, 2014, about a library swordsman who wanders the land restoring peace to a fractured society after the collapse. It was a way for me to get another story I wanted to read.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

For the last few years, I’ve become a super fan of books I enjoyed. On Goodreads and Amazon, I followed authors and envied those published authors. Hearing that it was possible to self-produce an ebook appealed to my desire to join the exalted rank, in my mind, of published authors. When seeing my name on Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Kobo, Smashwords, and Goodreads, I first considered myself an author. I now have a higher bar and respect the reviews offered by readers and the work of professional artists and editors that make it possible for my work to shine.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

Asante’s Gullah Journey is set in a future of the America South when advanced technology has been lost. Beneda is a teenage girl whose mother owns a large farm in the Gullah lands. She is a Black girl living in the community that shares a common background and culture. When the land is threatened Beneda and the farmers appeal to the Library to help them. In this society, libraries and librarians have major power because of ownership of the knowledge in books. Library Scout Asante, from Africa, helps the farmers against their enemies and attempts to preserve the peaceful order.

What inspired you to write this book?

After writing several stories in this low-tech world of the future, I wondered what kind of story could be told about one ethnically distinct group. Because of my background and relatives, I tried it first with Black Gullah inhabitants of the American South.

Do you have a specific writing style?

I write third person, in the POV of different characters during the story. I want the reader to walk in the characters’ shoes during the journey. While I include violence and some warfare in my tales, I want all readers to be able to follow them, so there are no excessive or gratuitous scenes. I hope my stories can be enjoyed from middle school age on up. Part plotting and part pantsing mean the story conclusion is planned, but there might be detours during story construction.

How did you come up with the title of this book?

This book was conceived as the first of a series that follows one of the main characters. I thought the African swordsman Asante would be that character. That explains his name in the title. To let potential readers know what to expect, the Gullah term was added. Gullah is used to describe a people, a culture, and a language shared by individuals in part of the American South. So, Asante’s Gullah Journey was seen as announcing the story for readers.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Shades of grey are in each character in the story. The evil ones are not purely evil, and our heroes don’t always make the right decisions. There is a chance for everyone to grow, and people should be given a chance to change, sometimes.

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know or events in your own life?

All the events and individuals in this story are fictitious. For this story to come true, modern technology would have to be lost due to an apocalyptic disaster. Then the Gullah people in the Carolinas would have to survive and thrive, maintaining their culture. While basing this story on how I think humans behave, I hope our descendants don’t have to face this future.

What authors have most influenced your life? What about them do you find inspiring?

I was able to escape the world when young, through the portal of science fiction books. The authors I read included Robert A. Heinlein, Frank Herbert, A. E. van Vogt, and Andre Norton. Those authors and others opened my eyes to other worlds, on this planet, and others. I believed almost anything was possible, and humans could improve. More recently, authors like Lois McMaster Bujold have shown me it is possible to write science fiction with heart, soul, and emotion. I feel inspired to think I can write in ways that can change people’s thoughts and lives.

If you had to choose, is there a writer would you consider a mentor? Why?

My writing has dramatically changed since meeting the development editor I work with today. Two years ago I first worked on a short story with help from E. J. Runyon. Working with E. J. has taught me the importance of the editing step in writing. I believe my writing quality has vastly improved, and excitingly, I believe there is even opportunity for greater improvement in the future. I enjoy and learn from E. J.’s fiction and nonfiction books.

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator?

Aaron Radney agreed to illustrate the cover for Asante’s Gullah Journey. I saw a piece he was working on for another project and it made me think of librarians. I knew I wanted the two mains, Beneda and Asante with a library background. It was a pleasure to work closely with him through the process from design, sketching, drawing, and coloring. He brought to life, the vision in my mind.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

I now believe editing is one of the most powerful parts of the writing process. Editing can take an average manuscript and turn it into a valuable intellectual property. While many stories have interesting premises, plots, or characters, how they are presented will determine whether readers will stay with them and appreciate them. My advice for any writer is to find an editor who brings out the best in you. A good editor will work well with you, and enable you to feel good about your work. You should see your work improve and develop your ability to craft better passages, scenes, and books.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

I can’t say enough of how I feel about my readers. You are why I do what I do. My efforts are dedicated to building a world that will envelop you and carry you away. I want to create for you what the science fiction writers of yesteryear did for me. May your reads always be enjoyable, may your reading journeys be long, safe and fulfilling.

Book Cover Asantes Gullah JourneyS. A. Gibson
Pasadena, California

FACEBOOK
GOODREADS
TWITTER

Asante’s Gullah Journey

Cover Artist: Aaron Radney

AMAZON
BARNES & NOBLE
KOBO

Author Interview: Angela Ashley

Author Angela Ashley writes to make sense of her world and to create one she can dwell in that is better than her own. Through her characters, she seeks to create people of depth, grace, and bravery, struggling like everyone to survive, and ultimately, to find love and meaning. She is also from my own home town of Lake Stevens, WA. It is a small world indeed! It is my pleasure to welcome Angela to No Wasted Ink.

Angela Ashley 1My name is Angela Craig, and my pen name is Angela Ashley, which was my birth name. I’m a single woman, born and raised in the Pacific Northwest. I loved reading books from a very young age. As a child, I loved books about animals, especially The Black Stallion series by Walter Farley. After having seen Star Wars in the theater and reading The Dark is Rising series by Susan Cooper, I fell in love with the science fiction and fantasy genres. When I attended Seattle Pacific University, I knew I should choose a major that would pay well, but I followed my heart instead, graduating with a B.A. in English Literature and a minor in Writing. I wanted to be a book editor but ended up being a home loan processor instead. I spend my free time reading, writing, and posting funny memes on Facebook when I’m not watching TV or movies with my boyfriend and my two cats.

When and why did you begin writing?

I’ve written poetry for years, but my job was so stressful that I found it drained most of my creativity away. And to be honest, I didn’t believe in myself enough to try my hand at writing more than poetry. But when the opportunity came to retire early, I knew what I wanted to do. I began to fill notebooks with my ideas that summer, and for months afterward. I fought through my fear and wrote my first chapter, and then another, and I surprised myself. A part of me had known I had this ability all along, but I’d pushed that voice down, until that moment. Now, I can’t imagine living without writing fiction. I’ve finally found who I am.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I’ve considered myself a writer of poetry since my teen years, but the first time I realized I was a fiction writer was three years ago. As a perfectionist, I didn’t want to try and fail, or even try and just do okay. When I wrote that first chapter, my muse came out in full force, and I haven’t stopped dancing with her since.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

I would describe it as Game of Thrones meets Dances With Wolves meets The Hunger Games meets Downton Abbey. The main character, Little Squirrel, is a native-American-esque teen who has come of age and must go on her Vision Quest. Her situation is unique because she’s of mixed heritage — her mother was First Daughter of House Mystalora in the Queensrealm, a woman-dominated society, while her father was a warrior of the People. While on her Quest, she is attacked and finds she has a very unusual ability. Her adopted brother and her best friend, both of whom are in love with her, find they do, as well. Meanwhile, in the Queensrealm, Kella is falling for Jaereth, a slave, even though their love is forbidden. They, too, realize they have strange abilities. Soon, they all find out they’re pawns in a game, pitted against each other and others, and that only one can survive. This game was created by unseen beings, seemingly for their amusement. But soon, it becomes clear that the real motive goes very deep, and the consequences of this ‘game’ will affect all of humanity.

What inspired you to write this book?

So many things. I’ve long been fascinated by native American culture and spirituality, and I wanted to pay homage to it and explore it with my writing. My grandma used to tell me we had native American blood, and it made me daydream about who they were and how they lived. I love the idea of shape-shifting, and I felt it would work well with the native American themes. But I found I couldn’t stop with that ability; they’re all so fun and provide so many opportunities for mischief. I also love strong female characters and a good dose of romance. But the number one inspiration was that I couldn’t find any more books that I wanted to read. They were all beginning to sound the same to me. So I decided to create my own world and the kind of characters I love, and just live in that world and let the characters inside me out.

Do you have a specific writing style?

I listen to my characters — who they are, what they want to say, and what is important to them. They are real people to me in that sense, and I respect their voices when I write. Oftentimes they surprise me by the directions they take, but I trust them. I know it sounds strange, but it’s the truth. They have a life of their own.

How did you come up with the title of this book?

It came from one of the later chapters of the book. The villain, Malyse, talks about the reason why she began the game. She and seven others had been transformed in an accident and become almost like gods in some ways, and she explains that just as the gods play with human lives on their chess board of life, she intends to play with the lives of others, and “sometimes a gambit must be made, a sacrifice offered, in order to win a game between gods.”

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

My characters talk a lot about love and whether it makes you stronger or weaker, and about whether people can truly be good or evil. I want my readers to draw their own conclusions on these subjects, of course, but I like these kinds of philosophical questions. I’m not one to just take concepts like good and evil for granted; I want to really look at what makes a person one or the other. In my book, several characters had tough childhoods, and one had a wonderful childhood — you would expect the former to be evil and the latter to be good, but it’s quite the opposite. We become good or evil depending on what’s inside of us, not because of what has happened to us.

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know or events in your own life?

They are most definitely based on events in my own life. Writing this book was great therapy for me. Father Daven, the priest who mistreats young Wilde, is built from my alcoholic Stepdad, Dave, though the abuse Wilde experiences are much worse than the abuse I experienced. The five sisters locked in a closet came from the fact that my grandma and her four sisters used to get locked in the closet as children, and some of the names are the same. My experiences with narcissists created my villain, Malyse, and the fact that Little Squirrel comes from a broken family unit and feels like an outsider is a direct result of my own childhood, though I wish I had a father figure like Miklos, as she does.

What authors have most influenced your life? What about them do you find inspiring?

The idea of being “Chosen” and having special abilities likely came from Susan Cooper’s The Dark is Rising series. Later in life, the Game of Thrones series by George R.R. Martin fired my imagination, and I took the idea of each chapter title indicating which character perspective that chapter would be from, from that series. I loved the first person present perspective from Suzanne Collins’ The Hunger Games and enjoyed how real it made the action feel, so I borrowed that, too.

If you had to choose, is there a writer you would consider a mentor? Why?

I would have to choose Suzanne Collins. The immediacy and nitty-gritty realness and imperfection of her characters and the action, plus their bravery in the face of terrible odds, really changed the way I looked at and approached fantasy fiction.

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator?

My beautiful cover art was created by Loraine Van Tonder of Ryn Katryn, Digital Art in South Africa. I decided to search on Facebook for a true artist since I thought so many of the self-pub covers coming out nowadays were so one-dimensional and uninspired. Her artwork, in contrast, was so beautiful and nuanced. She was so easy to work with and friendly and had wonderful ideas that really took my cover to the next level. The colors immediately grab your attention and draw you in, and the character renderings make you want to know more about them. Seeing her cover art for the first time was one of the highlights of my life. She managed to capture the magic, somehow.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

Don’t listen to that little voice that says you can’t do this. You can. Fill a bunch of notebooks with ideas, then sit down and start writing. Just start. That’s the hardest part, and once you do it, keep going. Don’t stop, ever. It’s the hardest thing you’ll ever do, but it’s so worth it, I promise you.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Welcome to my world, and I hope you love it as much as I do. Thank you for believing in me, and please, tell others. I’d love to hear from you, so don’t be afraid to reach out on Facebook, Goodreads, or Twitter, though I don’t use Twitter much. I’m always looking for new friends.

Gambit of the Gods Book CoverAngela Ashley
Lake Stevens, WA

FACEBOOK
GOODREADS
TWITTER

Gambit of the Gods

Cover artist: Loraine Van Tonder of Ryn Katryn Digital Art

AMAZON