Category Archives: Author Interviews

Author Interview: Jack Massa

Author Jack Massa has studied writing and other forms of magic for many years. He lives in Florida, USA, but wanders in many places. Please welcome him to No Wasted Ink.

Author Jack MassaHello! My name is Jack Massa. These days I write fiction, mainly fantasy in different subgenres—heroic, historical, urban, YA paranormal. Over the years, I’ve also published science fiction, poetry, and lots of nonfiction.

I grew up in suburban New Jersey, near New York City. I was raised in a working-class household with three siblings, an Irish mother, an Italian father, an Irish grandmother and her third husband, a Russian Jew. My grandmother also had a parakeet. I’ve been married to the best woman in the world for many years and we have an adult son. We live now in Southwest Florida which, except for overcrowding and the occasional hurricane, is certainly paradise.

When and why did you begin writing?

I’ve been a writer all my life. (I think I was a writer in other lifetimes too, but let’s focus on this one.) I started telling myself stories when I was three years old, playing with my toy soldiers. I made some of them superheroes and used my stuffed animals as monsters they either fought or made friends with.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I was privileged to attend a small, radical liberal arts college. “Radical” in that the institution largely made students figure things out for themselves. I tried a lot of things and decided writing fiction was for me. I wrote a magical realist novel as my senior thesis. The college validated that I was a writer by giving me my degree.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

I’m presently working on the third of the Abby Renshaw adventures, Ghosts of Lock Tower. It is a fantasy tale involving chaos magic, a Nazi ghost, an ancient Mesopotamian Goddess, and monsters that manifest from Internet memes. (Perhaps you can see why I’m still working on it.) I hope to release it in Summer, 2019.

Meantime, let’s talk about Abby’s first adventure, Ghosts of Bliss Bayou.

Abby is a typical girl from New Jersey with a propensity for the strange. (You might notice similarities to the author.) In Abby’s case, she tries to be a normal high school student, does well in school, runs on the track team, awkwardly tries to have a social life. (I know, I know, just like the author. I can’t help it.)

Abby’s problem in Ghosts of Bliss Bayou is that she is subject to hallucinations—scary ghosts and creatures popping out of her nightmares into waking life. Her quest is to solve the mystery of where these things come from and why they’re threatening her. The story takes her to her roots, in a small town in rural Florida, where she was born and where her grandmother still lives. There, she learns the hallucinations are in fact real and linked to her family’s history.

What inspired you to write this book?

Oh my! Lots of things. I gather inspiration the way a lint brush picks up lint—No wait, there must be a better analogy…

I’ve always been interested in reading about magic and mysticism—Tarot Cards, Kabbalah, spiritualism, you name it. I was especially fascinated by the so-called “occult revival” in the late 19th Century, when mediums became a big thing and educated folks in Europe and the U.S. joined secret societies to study magic. All of this worked its way into the backstory of the book.

Also, my wife and I love visiting places in “old Florida,” especially spots that were tourist destinations when we were little kids, but are now largely bypassed. I had an idea for writing a ghost story set in one of these places. When we visited the town of Micanopy, then took a boat ride on the amazingly beautiful Silver Springs, it all came together.

Do you have a specific writing style?

That really varies with the type of book. The Abby stories are first person, present tense, with lots of focus on what she’s feeling in the moment—as befits YA fiction. My other books are third person, past tense, even with some “omniscient narrator” to give a broad and epic sweep.

In all my work, I try to write with immediacy and vivid visual detail. I think it was D.H. Lawrence who said, “First, I wish to make you see.” I like that.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

The Reality we think we know is only one small piece of a much larger moving picture.

As one of the characters, a retired Anthropology professor, puts it, “the Universe is vast and incomprehensible. To try to understand it, the human mind creates maps. Science is one big set of maps. Magic is just another set. Both kinds of maps are valid in different ways. But the Universe will always be bigger and stranger than any map.”

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

To this I will only say: Like Abby, I’ve always had a propensity for the strange.

What authors have most influenced your life? What about them do you find inspiring?

Wow. Way too many to name.

Shakespeare first, always.

For delving into the depths of the human soul, classic authors such as Dostoevsky, Conrad, Emily Bronte, and Nikos Kazantzakis (author of Zorba the Greek).

For fantastic adventure and sense of wonder, Tolkien, Roger Zelazny, Jack Vance, Kim Stanly Robinson, Robert E. Howard (author of the original Conan stories).

Among newer writers, I really admire Cassandra Clare, Maggie Stiefvater, and NK Jemison.

If you had to choose, is there a writer would you consider a mentor? Why?

Literally, I had a mentor, a writer named George Cuomo. He was a professor in my MFA program in graduate school. He was not at all into fantasy and science fiction, but he made it his business to encourage me and help me build my skill. He also helped me get my first novel published.

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator?

Ida Jansson of Amygdala Design. I found her by online searching.

The cover was actually a collaboration between Ida, myself, and my wife (who is an artist). I usually come up with design concepts and sketch them out in PowerPoint, then rework them with my wife. Ida was very flexible in working with us.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

Choose your goals. Decide what defines success for you.

As a business, writing is a very tough game. Simply put, there is way more supply than demand. In other words, there are many more capable writers than there are paying readers to support them.

If you want to write for money you’re going to have to work really, really hard. You’re also going to have to learn a lot about the business of publishing (which is changing all the time). Also, you’re most likely going to have to adapt what you want to write to fit a profitable market niche. And again, the market is always changing. Did I mention it’s a tough game?

So choose your goals. You may want to write for your own satisfaction, or just to reach a few readers and say something of value to them. That too is a worthwhile goal. You will have created something and added to the human conversation.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Enjoy yourselves. The Universe is wider and stranger than we can imagine. As a friend of mine who is a bard likes to say, “Live well and in wonder.”

Ghosts of Bliss BayouJack Massa
Sarasota, Florida

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Ghosts of Bliss Bayou

Cover artist: Ida Jansson
Publisher:  Triskelion Books 

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Author Interview: Kumar L

Author Kumar L is a writer of sci-fi and fantasy – adventure, thrills & drama with a positive outlook on what the future may hold for humanity. Please welcome him to No Wasted Ink.

Author Kumar LHi. My name is Saurabh, but I write under the pen name Kumar L. If you want to discuss faster-than-light, time travel and black holes or new mobiles phones, then I am your person. I am a tech enthusiast and social media newbie. I enjoy travelling and am fluent in several languages. A mechanical engineer who loves pulling apart gadgets and exploring their innards; I write science fiction stories and try to bring technology alive in my books.

I live in Mumbai, India with my wife and two daughters who are both aspiring engineers as well.

When and why did you begin writing?

I started off by writing small articles on my professional LinkedIn page. I am a huge science fiction fan and religiously follow Star Trek and Star Wars. I had been toying with an idea for a story in my head, and just started penning it down. I completed it in 2017 and published it the same year in May. As I was finishing the first draft, I realised it could be made into a series and thus started my journey.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Hmm. I think it was only after a year, once I had the second book published, and the translation of book 1 into Hindi completed. Three books look good on the Amazon Central profile!

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

I’ve just completed the draft for the third book in the Earth to Centauri series – Black Hole: Oblivion. The series has a female protagonist Captain Anara and covers a journey chasing alien signals to the Alpha Centauri star system. The current book covers their exploits when faced with the most formidable force of nature – a black hole.

What inspired you to write this book?

Again, the series is progressing as I write and I try to incorporate new ideas which may appeal to my readers. In each book, there is a specific situation the crew of the starship tries to resolve while the core story moves between three planets. I wanted to bring forth realistic science for readers using simple language everyone can understand.

Do you have a specific writing style?

I’m not sure how my style would be identified, and I am not an expert at grammar. I use simple language and try to tell the story through conversations between the characters with a bit of imagery. Most reviews have said they like the lucid simple content.

How did you come up with the title of this book?
As I said, I wanted the events to be realistic and had read about the planet Proxima b, which is expected to be found near the star Proxima Centauri. That planet fit perfectly with the story of the novel. The book was to be based on the first journey from Earth into interstellar space and so it became ‘Earth to Centauri: The First Journey.’

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

A few messages, in fact, some may be cliched but relevant nevertheless:
We need to appreciate the differences between people and accept them.
Women will become more assertive as time goes by and gender differences will reduce substantially.

Humankind will transcend the issues of today, survive and thrive. The future is bright even if it is not utopian.,

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know or events in your own life?

Not really, but I have drawn on some of the lessons from my former bosses and tried to share some of their wisdom.

What authors have most influenced your life? What about them do you find inspiring?

Jeffrey Archer, Amish, and JK Rowling. Mostly because they engage the reader into the story using simple relatable language and build a believable fantasy.

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator?

As a self-published person, I tried to make the cover myself at first. The result was really bad. I really did not know much about how this is done, so I found a designer on upwork.com. She did a decent design but had not done much work in the scifi genre. Anyway, I went ahead and published with her artwork. A little later I decided to change the cover and took advice from a few other self-published authors especially on FB groups, found another designer on Upwork who’d worked in this genre and got a great looking professional cover. For two of my short story collections, I designed the covers myself on Canva as I wanted to keep the costs really low, but for the third book of the series, I found another person who has done simply outstanding work.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

Quite a bit. In fact, I wrote a small book – One Step at a Time – Your self-publishing masterplan, which is available for free download from my website.
But the most important piece is – self-published authors need to be good marketers as well. They must know the basics of FB, Insta and other modes of social advertising at the very least.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Thank you for buying my books, and leaving me great reviews. I improve my craft with every new book and I work hard to keep you engaged and entertained.

First JourneyKumar L
Mumbai, India

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Earth to Centauri – The First Journey

Cover Artist: Alex and Cathy Walker

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Author Interview: C.I. Chevron

Definitely ADHD—C.I. Chevron loves to write everything from Christian to hard science fiction. Problem is, she loves to read just as much and has a hard time deciding which to do first. Please welcome her to No Wasted Ink.

Author CI ChevronI began writing at a very young age on anything I could get my hands on, including, don’t kill me, my picture books. When I was nine, my great grandmother took out her old typewriter and taught me to type. What a revelation. I wrote all the way through high school. Then college, marriage, kids, and showing horses competitively got in the way and I stopped. About ten years ago my mother (my greatest fan and supporter) passed away. Then not too long after, my stallion. I was floating without the will to do anything. So I turned back to writing. It’s been full steam ahead since.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I wrote this monstrosity of a fantasy book when I was sixteen. My sister loved it and read every word asking for more. The validation of having a devoted fan—yeah, I know she was my sister—made me think, hey, I can do this. Even if it took a while. My mother kept the book. A huge file of loose single spaced scribbled on mess. Sometimes I take it out and look and it and think—maybe this year.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

Metal and Bone is a fractured CinderElla fairy tale set in an alternate steampunk timeline of 1870. Ella is a modified human, forced to work as a servant and thief for her stepmother, a German agent. Of course, there is a handsome Prince, returned from the warfront when his brother, the crown prince, is killed. At loose ends, he works with Scotland yard to apprehend the thief Cinder. Unbeknownst to him the woman he has fallen in love with, Ella, has a lot of secrets. As does the thief Cinder.

What inspired you to write this book?

Quite simply, I love fractured fairy tales. I read as many as I can get my hands on.

Do you have a specific writing style?

I used to be a pantser, but after several saggy middles and stories that just didn’t go anywhere, I pretty must plot my stories now. The outlines are fluid and tend to change—a lot. But when I get stuck, I look at the outline, and away I go.

How did you come up with the title of this book?

My main character, Ella, was modified by her godmother using a secret method from the Egyptian tombs (since lost again) that fused wires (metal) to nerves and bone. Thus—Metal and Bone.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

I really don’t tend to write with a message in mind, but I do write strong women. Basically, do what you need to do women.

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know or events in your own life?

Not at all. I am an escapist writer and reader. I want to fall into the story and disappear, and I want to take the reader with me. Of course, there are a few things that may be traced to people I know or things I have seen or done, but I’m not admitting to anything.

What authors have most influenced your life? What about them do you find inspiring?

Too many to count. Any person, indie author or traditional, that can take me on a journey, who has a good story to tell, I will read. Not matter mistakes, even plot holes. It’s all about the story for me.

If you had to choose, is there a writer would you consider a mentor? Why?

The people of NETWO (Northeast Texas Writers Organization) have been my mentors for the past eight years. They are supportive and offer up the best constructive criticism ever.

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator?

Steven Novak did this cover and I love it. It won the People choice at the 2019 NETWO conference’s cover contest. Steven is easy to work with, and you just can’t beat that. He gets back to me, is willing to change things up over and over again until we get it right.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

Find a critique group that meets regularly or put one together yourself. I am in a group that has met at a local coffee house every Tuesday for over a year and a half. They are great for bouncing ideas off, finding plot holes, running book trailers by, and discussing marketing or just the book world in general.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Thank you. Thank you. Thank you.

MetalBone_CVR_SMLC.I. Chevron
Cookville, TX

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Cover Artist: Steven Novak

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Author Interview: Ronesa Aveela

Author Ronesa Aveela is “the creative power of two.” Two authors writing as one to introduce the world to the rich and magical culture of Bulgaria. Please welcome them to No Wasted Ink.

Author Ronesa AveelaThis is the pen name of two authors: Nelly Toncheva and Rebecca Carter (who will be answering questions today). Nelly is married and has two children. In the late 90s, she came to the U.S. from Bulgaria when her husband won a national lottery (not monetary, but immigration). She enjoys painting to relax. Rebecca is happily single. She’s lived her entire live in New England: hates the cold, but it’s home. She enjoys reading, knitting, and baking, although author-related tasks take up most of her time nowadays.

When and why did you begin writing?

Our writing career began in 2011, when Nelly asked me to help her with a book she had written in Bulgarian, a romantic fantasy about a place she fell in love with when she visited: Emona, Bulgaria. Since English wasn’t her native language and I had a background in editing and publishing, she wanted help making it sound good in English.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I’ve always enjoyed writing. In my senior year in high school, as part of a class assignment, I wrote a short murder mystery in the style of Agatha Christie. It was one of the few papers that impressed the teacher enough that she read it to the class. Since then, writing has been the most enjoyable part of the various jobs I’ve held.

As far as professional writing is concerned, although we started working on the book in 2011, it wasn’t until we finally published it in 2014 that the word “writer” became “author.”

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

I’m working on the second book in a nonfiction series called “Spirits and Creatures,” which focuses on the mythology and folklore of Eastern Europe. This book is about Rusalki, Slavic mermaids. All the books in the series are geared toward the non-academic world to bring the rich culture and mythology of Bulgaria and the eastern world to the western world. The books include artwork and stories to make the creatures come alive, as well as links to videos and music.

What inspired you to write this book?

In our fantasy book The Unborn Hero of Dragon Village, a character possesses a book called Lamia’s Bible. This book holds the secrets of all the creatures who live in Dragon Village. I wanted to know what secrets these creatures might have that would enable someone to defeat them, so I did more research. I discovered a wealth of information that I wanted to share.

Do you have a specific writing style?

The writing depends on the type of book we are working on. We write fiction (adult and children’s) and non-fiction. The first book in the adult fantasy (Mystical Emona: Soul’s Journey) is slower paced, with many descriptions, as we want to draw the reader into the location and customs of the people. The children’s fiction (one full-length novel and a few short stories) are faster paced, with more action. We wanted to make the nonfiction books fun, so the writing style is chatty.

How did you come up with the title of this book?

I’ll talk about our recent book, The Unborn Hero of Dragon Village. Bulgarian folklore references “unborn children” (boys and girls), who will become great heroes because at least one of their parents is a supernatural creature. Quite often, the mother is human and the father is a dragon. Other heroes are born from a Samodiva (woodland nymph) and a human father whom the nymph enchanted. Dragon Village (Zmeykovo in Bulgarian) is a place at the end of the world where all the mythical creatures live in the wintertime. They return to the human world on March 25, which in Bulgaria is called Blagovets.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Besides wanting to introduce people to the world of Bulgarian mythology and folklore, The Unborn Hero of Dragon Village wants kids to know they are not alone. There are people who can help them accomplish their goals in life if they work together as a team. And, their differences make them unique and special.

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know or events in your own life?

No, but every kid has a fantasy about being special, especially if that child is different. We all long to believe in the stories we were told as a child. In Bulgaria, Samodivi are still very much alive in the minds of the people. They are beloved and feared.

What authors have most influenced your life? What about them do you find inspiring?

My favorite authors when I was growing up were Agatha Christie and Taylor Caldwell. They both made me think. With Christie, it was a matter of using my mind to solve a murder mystery. With Caldwell, it was pondering the world: politics, religion, life in general.

If you had to choose, is there a writer would you consider a mentor? Why?

I’d pick Neil Gaiman. Having recently read his American Gods book, I’d like to know more about his research methods into various mythologies that he included in the book.

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator?

Nelly designed the cover for The Unborn Hero of Dragon Village. Even though she does her own artwork, we decided to have the cover illustrated by Dmitry Yakhovsky. He does marvelous illustrations and works quickly.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

Don’t give up. It can be frustrating, but find other authors you can talk with about issues you are having. We’ve all gone through it, and are willing to support each other.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Indie authors love hearing from you. A single kind word or message does so much to brighten our day and make the struggles of publishing worth it. Please also take the time to write reviews, even a sentence or two telling others what you thought of the books you’ve read.

CS-Cover_UnbornHeroRonesa Aveela
Swanzey, NH and Virginia Beach, VA

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The Unborn Hero of Dragon Village

Cover Artist: Dmitry Yakhovsky
Publisher: Bendideia Publishing

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Author Interview: Lisa Hofmann

Author Lisa Hofmann is a planner, and she loves doing on-site research, taking her children to every castle within driving distance to spend hours exploring the grounds, embarrassing their family at any given moment whenever taking a guided tour, because she’s the woman who’s always got just one more question for the guide.  Please give her a warm welcome to No Wasted Ink.

Author Lisa HofmannHi, I’m Lisa Hofmann. I’m 43 years old, married, and a mother of three with a houseful of pets. I was educated in Germany and in Ireland, which has certainly shaped who I am today.

By day, I’m an elementary school teacher who works with migrant children and refugees. At night, I turn into a rabid dark fantasy writer who survives on cappuccino and cheese snacks.

When and why did you begin writing?

I started writing when I was still in school, but only seriously pursued it much, much later, when I was in my late thirties and discovered that I could actually do this on my own with no need of a publisher. I believe traditional publishing has its merits, but it’s not for someone like me who’s on a tight time-budget. I’m not a full-time writer. I work a lot of extra hours in my daytime job as a teacher, and I have three children who have my full attention. That means, I steal time to write whenever I can. I can’t imagine having meet tight deadlines for my novels or fulfill contracts for possible further books of a series within a certain time frame. I’d constantly feel pressured, and to me, writing is meant to be a pleasurable activity. It’s what I really love doing, and I’m my own boss in that area. I define my own standards, and I want to keep writing the books I myself would like to read, and not have to write to please an editor who’d like to see me change my content to suit someone else’s tastes. That’s why I always shied away from offering my work to traditional publishing houses, and I never looked for an agent. So far, I’m quite enjoying doing this my way, in my own time.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

When I started aimfully writing my first book, Stealing the Light. I loved the whole process or writing and publishing it. It felt right, and I knew immediately that this was something I was going to be doing for a long time to come.

Could you share a little about your current book with us?

My current work in progress is a third book of a series, titled “Gates of Eventide”. It’s being edited as we speak, and I’m very excited to get it out there. The series is about a community of outlaws with magical abilities who are hiding in plain sight, operating a fair that sells magical items and puts on shows. The Fair’s biggest problem is one of their own, so to speak – a woman with dangerous magical Talents who grew up outside the community, was rejected by it, and has gained a powerful position among the humans who are out to destroy the Unnaturals. I hope to release this third book in late summer, perhaps earlier, depending on how long the process of getting it ready with my editor and cover artist it will take.

The book I’ve most recently released is titled Trading Darkness. This is a stand-alone novel that’s set during the time of the witch trials in the late medieval period near my home town. Some of the events that I described in it are real, and a few of the characters as well. It was a lot of fun to research, and even more so to finally write it, since the initial idea for it was stewing for about twenty years, since my studies of local history.

What inspired you to write this book?

The series was an idea that arose from a piece of music I’d been listening to. I was talking to a friend one Saturday about it, and she encouraged me to pursue the thought. It was more a joke than something serious at the time, since we were playing around with characters from a TV series, discussing how so-and-so would handle a complete disaster like the one I was imagining for the storyline, and what such-and-such a person would do, but then I sat down and started making character charts for original characters and began outlining. The idea kept growing and getting bigger, and I suddenly found myself completely captivated.

The stand-alone novel is a book that I’ve been wanting to write ever since my time at university. I studied women’s history and I visited one of the sites where witches were executed in the course of a class I was taking on the witch trials. Standing on “Gallow’s Hill” sent shivers down my spine, and I remember thinking that life certainly writes the most fascinating stories.

How did you come up with the title of this book?

The series title is the title of a piece by Mozart – Dies Irae, The Requiem. The idea of light and darkness was already in the first two book titles, so Gates of Eventide is a variation, basically, that tells the reader that we’re heading toward a place where shadows lie in wait.

Trading Darkness has to do with the bargain one of the main characters makes with the devil. He’s trading one darkness for another, but it’s a deal he’s going to regret for the rest of his life.

Do you have a specific writing style?

I think my style is pretty much my own. I don’t try to imitate other writers, but I do read a lot of good books, so there are always bound to be traces of other author’s styles somewhere in what I’m doing. But I do think my voice is my own.

Is there a message in your novel that you want your readers to grasp?

I think my style is pretty much my own. I don’t try to imitate other writers, but I do read a lot of books by great authors whose work I love and have been reading for decades, so there are always bound to be traces of those authors’ styles somewhere in what I’m doing. But I do think my voice is my own.

I find writing in my particular genre a bit of a challenge since it’s not strictly sword-and-sorcery or epic fantasy, but something that I would consider more “soft fantasy”, for lack of a better term. There is magic, and there are magical creatures, but the story is very much more character-driven than a typical sword-and-sorcery might be. I don’t do formula writing – I don’t write for a market of readers who would expect a storyline to develop a certain way per se. I write for readers who love intense characters and intense story development, rather than expect epic battles with dragon-riders and orcs on every other page of the book. My books have characters who are people of their time in a world parallel to ours, only with the premise that magic is a reality and not a superstition. There are real people’s conflicts in a medieval setting based on that premise, and there’s good and evil and every shade of gray in between.

What other authors have most influenced your life?

This is going to sound funny, but I read a lot of different kinds of things. I could name a lot of authors as having influenced my life and my writing. I think Stephen King would be one of them – but in contrast, I would also say Cornelia Funke. What I admire about King is his drive and how he’s managed to keep producing good books over a period of so many decades now. What I admire about Funke is her determination even in the face of personal tragedies, and her ability to evolve. She made a name for herself as an author of children’s books, but what she really is, is a very gifted fantasy writer for all ages. She’s proven that with her Reckless series.

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator?

Giuseppa Lo Coco designed the covers for the Dies Irae Series. She’s very talented, pleasant, and easy to work with, and she came up with the images to the words as if she was seeing what I was. That’s magical!

Do you have any advice for other writers?

In terms of the writing as such: practice your Art and stay humble. Writing is a craft that you need to hone and work hard to move toward as high a level as you can get. Plan what you’re doing, and rewrite and revise as often as necessary. I also believe it’s ever so important to work with professionals. Get in touch with a good editor, even if you’re thinking of having your work agented and publishing traditionally – polish your manuscript and make it the best you can before you put it in front of an agent or your readers.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Thank you for enjoying my books. Tell your friends about them and support indie authors by leaving an honest review, if possible. It’s what keeps us going.

Stealing the Light E-Book FINAL VERSIONLisa Hofmann
Siegen, Germany.

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Stealing the Light 

Cover artist: Giusy Lo Coco

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