Author Interview: Shidorr Myirck-Gayer

One of the pleasures of the author interview series on No Wasted Ink is the chance to meet and learn about new authors and what motivated them to begin writing. I hope you’ll find Shidorr’s story as interesting as I did.

Author Shidorr Myirck-GayerHello, my name is Shidorr Myirck-Gayer. I currently live in the North Suburbs of the Chicago land area. I grew up in Chicago with the
dream of becoming an actress. I performed in a few plays and was an extra in a few movies, one such as Spiderman 2. It was an amazing experience. Sadly I never made it any further; life got in the way… I guess. In the middle of pursuing my dream as an actress, I wrote poetry and stories. At the time, I didn’t realize that writing is where my true journey rests. I have always been interested in the world of creating tales. Pulling people in my fictional fantasies.

When and why did you begin writing?

The tragedy that consumed me ultimately pushed me into the society of published authors. Depression made me write my first novel. Her Name
is Grace
. In 2010 I had lost another child in the early months of my pregnancy. Writing was my way of dealing with my sadness.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I first considered myself as a writer, when I became published. I didn’t think the work I created counted until now.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

I must say, I had to laugh a little bit at this question. Every time someone asks me what my book is about. I can never shorten it enough,
for a quick answer. Okay, here goes…

My story is about a young girl named Grace, who grows up on a planet that’s inhabited by angels. Her and her best friend, Max, is being
trained to one day become angels themselves. The angels on the planet Mahlai hope that increasing their numbers can end the slavery war on
Earth. They also have to defend their planet against the dark angels who seek to kidnap the trainees and destroy the world of men. In this
tale Grace and Max finds discovers a powerful tool that the angels use to watch over the humans. This tool changes Grace and Max
personalities. Grace falls in love with a human and Max takes a turn for the worst.

What inspired you to write this book?

My husband’s support helped me achieve my goal of finishing the first book, of a 3 book series.

Do you have a specific writing style?

I don’t really have a writing style. I can confirm that no matter how hard I try. I can’t write the book in order. I always start on a mid
chapter first.

How did you come up with the title of this book?

I just love the name, Grace. I had a cat named that once.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

There is no message; I just want my readers to live in a world unlike their own.

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

I must say, I create my characters based on people that I know and books that I have read. For example, I have quotes from the bible and
my angels are lightly based on angels of the bible. Author Kristin Cashore depicts strong female characters in her novels and I love
that. The backdrop of my stories comes from my travels and my daydreams.

What authors have most influenced your life?

My favorite Authors are, Kristin Cashore, Suzanne Collins and John of the bible.

If you had to choose, is there a writer would you consider a mentor?

If I had to choose a mentor, it would be Kristin Cashore. Meeting her
in person confirms that.

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator?

My cover designer is John Konecny. He is an amazing artist, easy to work with and he understands what you want.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

The advice that I would give is the advice that is said over and over
again to writers, KEEP WRITING! This really does help you when you
think your work is not good enough. When you get writers block and
especially when you began to doubt yourself.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

To all my readers, Thank You for your support and I’ll try my best to
make the next book an even better adventure!

Her Name is Grace - book coverShidoor Myinck-Gayer
Her Name is Grace

Book Cover by John Konecny.

No Wasted Ink Writer’s Links

From a mechanical typewriter connected to an iPad to tips on the perfect book cover to general writing tips, this week’s Writer’s Links has it all.



10 Grammar Mistakes that Can Keep Your Content from Spreading

Unemployed College Graduates: Blog Yourself a Job

5 Sentences Repaired by Correct Use of Commas

Getting it Done: A Guide to Productive Goal-Setting for Freelancers

Typewriter Landscape (YouTube Video)

Taking Responsibility for Your Book Cover

11 Lessons from a Year of Full-Time Entrepreneurship

What Makes a Good Almost Kiss?

The Craft of Writing

Jumpstarting Fiction: How to Find Unique, Timely Ideas to Energize Your Creativity

Writing Space: Cris Cosper

I’ve known Cris for some time on various Facebook literary book groups and knew that she was a writer just like myself. I invited her to do a guest post about her writing space here on No Wasted Ink.

Writer Cris Cosper
Writer Cris Cosper
My earliest memories are mostly of my Grandpa telling me stories, even on into my 30s, about his childhood and other family members and how things were in the 1930s and on, whether farming or living in the city, even the Great Depression era. Then there were the librarians and story times, my cousins and campfires, now my nieces and nephews and stories I tell from my childhood about their parents and stories I remember Grandpa telling me. I became a storyteller because of other storytellers. Plus, I like to communicate and pass things on to the next generation.

I only recently started to consider seriously that I could have an easy, natural knack for writing. I’ve been writing essays and poetry over the decades since grade school. Most of the topics were of non-fiction genres, life topics, natural world, personal experiences and scientific research pieces based on other printed works. Authors like Jules Verne, Edgar Rice Burroughs and Mary Shelley have inspired my imagination to fire non-stop. The freedom and possibility to travel were THE perks I needed to motivate me into launching on this adventure. My mother quipped, “I always liked your writing.” It was all I needed to hear. When writing, I can exercise that part of me that says: “I have not, will not, and will never grow up.” My eldest nephew says he can’t wait to read my first book. (We’re real pals.)

cris cosper writing space
Cris Cosper’s Writing Space
My writing space best reflects that part of my self-perception where I think I am still just out of high school, living in a dorm setting. I typically will “travel” as I write, starting from laying on my stomach, or sitting cross-legged, story-boarding or writing idea/concept lists in my notebook, or typing up the story on my notebook, a plain Acer Aspire One where I myself upgraded the RAM chip. (I’m pretty good at tinkering with anything technical or mechanical. Such a tomboy. I can change the oil and filter in my car, if I want to.) Eventually, I get tired of one spot and graft over to another, such as the floor with a pillow behind me. I think this opens up the physical headspace for me as I tend to look upwards when I need ideas. (Mom tells me I used to watch the trees sway with the breeze and the clouds pass by. Come to think of it, I still do this.) Later, I move to the patio in the afternoon, then I graft back in. It’s a rare day that I can write not near a window. It’s like I have to be connected to the natural world.

cris cosper writing tools
Cris Cosper’s Writing Tools
I’m a minimalist at heart, so I use only the basics in physical tools. Paper and pen for ideas, lists and research. I use the netbook for typing up stories. But lately, I have considered telling a story from my head and recording it and then putting it to page. But, my real tool remains the same for the osmosis of story fodder: My gift of gab and knack for research.



Chris Cosper
Writer, Cosmic Captives Series
First novel in write-up: Lair of the Sun
Targeted: November 2012
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Book Review: Starship Troopers

Book Name: Starship Troopers
Author: Robert A. Heinlein
First Published: 1959
Winner of Hugo Award for Best Novel in 1960

Robert A Heinlein started his career as a writer by publishing short stories in Astounding Science Fiction, which was edited by John Campbell. He went on to write many more short stories and novelettes for Astounding Science Fiction, many of which later were republished as short novels. Heinlein’s first novel that was published as a book was Rocket Ship Galileo. It had been rejected at first because the notion of going to the moon was considered to be too outlandish, but Heinlein soon found a new publisher, Scribner’s, that began to publish a Heinlein “juvenile” novel once a year at Christmas. Eight of these first edition young adult novels were illustrated by Clifford Geary in a distinctive white-on-black style. The Heinlein Juveniles featured a mixture of adolescent and adult themes, the characters experiencing the sorts of personal issues that young adults commonly find themselves in, combined with fantastic futuristic machinery and complex ideas. Heinlein was of the opinion that young readers were much more sophisticated and able to handle more complex themes than people of the times realized and his writing reflected this.

Heinlein’s last “juvenile” novel was Starship Troopers. It is said that this novel was his personal reaction to the calls for President Dwight D. Eisenhower to stop nuclear testing in 1958. The novel met with great success and won the 1960 Hugo Award for Best Novel. It is still in print to this day.

Starship Troopers is a coming-of-age story about citizenship, duty, and the role of the military in society and is set during an unspecified time of the near future when humans have developed interstellar travel. The book portrays a society in which full citizenship, in order to vote or to hold public office, is earned by the willingness to place society’s interests before one’s own and in participation of government service. In the case of the young hero, this was military service. The novel is seen through the eyes of young Juan “Johnnie” Rico who narrates the story through a series of flashbacks. Johnnie remembers his enlistment and training in the Mobile Infantry and his part in the interstellar war with the Arachnids (the bugs) of Klendathu. Through combat and training, Johnnie begins as a lowly private, but eventually becomes an officer and decides that being a career soldier is his life’s path. Life in the military shapes him into the man he becomes.

Rico, through a series of conversations with Ret. Lt. Colonel Jean V. Dubois, his instructor of History and Moral Philosophy during his high school years, and Fleet Sergeant Ho, a recruiter for the Armed Forces of the Terran Federation, the political and military ideas of the novel are presented. This is the meat of the novel, the concepts of how this particular society sees itself and their version of manifest destiny. The ideas are robust, but controversial.

One of the main virtues of science fiction is to depict other ways that society and culture might organize and function, giving us the reader new sparks of ideas of how society might otherwise function. I am not certain if all the political ideas that this novel portrays would completely work, but it does give one plenty of room for contemplation. Even now, 50 years after its published date, Starship Troopers inspires heated debate about its core concepts. Somehow, I believe that Heinlein would have been pleased to know this.

While the development of powered armor is Starship Troopers most famous legacy, the novel’s influence into the concepts of contemporary warfare are myriad. The novel is on the official reading list of the US Army, US Navy and the US Marine Corp, the only science fiction novel to have that distinction. The all volunteer, high-tech strike force military of Heinlein’s book, a futuristic concept at that time since the armed forces of Heinlein’s day were filled by conscription forces serving a two year hitch, is now similar in style of our own modern day volunteer armed forces. I know of more than one young man that told me that he volunteered for service in the infantry based on reading this novel. The story is powerful and to some minds it might be disturbing.

Of all the authors that I read growing up, Robert A. Heinlein was the most influential on me, both as a writer and as a citizen. The ideas of libertarianism, of self-reliance, and of personal responsibility all came from reading the myriad of novels and short stories that this author wrote. His dead-on prediction of many scientific gadgets that we take for granted today, such as flat screen television, cell phones, and other everyday items was astounding. There is a saying among writers that “Heinlein was here first.” For good reason. His stories have shaped the genre of science fiction in ways that are incalculable. If you are to become familiar with science fiction in general, Robert A. Heinlein should be on your reading list.

List of Robert A. Heinlein’s Juvenile Novels:

    Rocket Ship Galileo, 1947
    Space Cadet, 1948
    Red Planet, 1949
    Between Planets, 1951
    The Rolling Stones, 1952
    Farmer in the Sky, 1953
    Starman Jones, 1953
    The Star Beast, 1954
    Tunnel in the Sky, 1955
    Double Star, 1956 — Hugo Award, 1956
    Time for the Stars, 1956
    Citizen of the Galaxy, 1957
    Have Space Suit—Will Travel, 1958 — Hugo Award nominee, 1959
    Starship Troopers, 1959 — Hugo Award, 1960




starship troopers book coverStarship Troopers can be found at your local library or any bookstore. It is not in the public domain, but often times you can find a used copy at a very reasonable price.

No Wasted Ink Writer’s Links

There were many great posts on writing this week. I had trouble picking out only ten to share with you this Monday. I hope you enjoy them!



5 Ways to Improve Your Focus While Working Online

Kimberly Griffiths Little – Write On Con 2012 VLOG

The Secret to Writing 4000 Words a Day

12 Lessons Learned from 12 Years of Writing

Dragon Voice Recognition For Freelance Writers

7 Reasons to Publish a Blog

Readability: the Optimal Line Length

7 Productivity Tips From My Vacation That Freelancers Can Use All Year

Rigged Reviews

How To Work On More Than One Book At A Time

Author Interviews * Book Reviews * Essays * Writer's Links * Scifaiku

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