Author Interview: Brad Blake

Brad Blake and I met at the El Capitan Theater in Los Angeles during a science fiction get together for fans of Edgar Rice Burroughs. He is an author with several books under his belt and is a fellow “late starter” like myself when it comes to writing novels. I’m grateful that he consented to be interviewed here at No Wasted Ink.

Please introduce yourself to our readers, Brad.

I’m a native Northern Californian, married with two grown children and a career spent in technology sales. My mom was a teacher and librarian and my dad was a lover of history. I enjoy sports, travel, food, movies, music, the arts, and of course have a lifelong love affair with books. I’ll give in eventually, but do not yet own an eBook reader of any kind.

When and why did you begin writing?

My first memory is writing a nonsensical story about transforming into a bug which I tried to read in front of my 6th grade class, but started laughing so hard I couldn’t stop. I recall reading Mysterious Island by Jules Verne about this time, which forever hooked me into grand adventure and science fiction. My first serious attempt at fiction writing was after college, and mostly short stories submitted to science fiction magazines. Looking at these stories now offers a lesson in how not to write. I put writing aside for the next 20 years while raising a family and working.

Back in 2000 I took a screenwriting class. Over the next few years I wrote a handful of movie scripts, two of which are quite good and have done well in competitions. However, as I attended awards ceremonies at film events such as the Charleston International Film Festival, it became obvious that even the greatest screenplay has almost zero chance of being made into anything. However, the fact that I’d completed full movie scripts gave me the confidence that I needed to start writing. Plus the positive recognition gave me the confidence that I could write a good novel. Unlike screenplays, there was the potential to publish.

In early 2009 I was looking for a new job, and while searching, my wife suggested I start writing my first book. Now in 2012 I have three novels published, the fourth written and the fifth fully plotted and almost half done. These comprise one story arc spread over five books. On a side note I’m also an artist, mostly pen and ink, and have included my original drawings in each book.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

Since this is a five book “Blue Third” series, I’ll start with the first:

Blue Third – Citlalli and the Destroyer – The title is meant to be a throwback to the grand adventure books I’ve always loved, from Verne to H.G. Wells to Edgar Rice Burroughs’ John Carter of Mars series. I tried with Citlalli to create and write this kind of exciting tale, updated into our 21st century world, with young adults as its main heroes.

Citlalli and the Destroyer is a space adventure with a unique, fast-paced story. The novel takes seven teenagers from different cultures, one from 5,000 years ago, and throws them into unbelievable adventures on which the fate of Earth and the galaxy rests. The story begins by introducing Citlalli in her native Mexico of 5,000 years ago. After inadvertently becoming a stowaway on a cocoa trader’s interstellar vessel, she ends up being teamed with six teenagers of today. They come from different cultures and families, and along with Citlalli and a bunch of intelligent alien allies are thrust into journeys that will determine the fate of everyone’s civilizations in battling a monstrously evil entity known as The Destroyer. The adventurers include five girls, two boys, and a Basset hound named Lucy. Their journey forces them to learn about friendship, courage, strength, sacrifice and more. I believe the novel offers unique ideas, a very original story, and a genuinely exciting and fun reading experience. I remain very proud of it.

What inspired you to write this book?

All those wonderful authors and their fantastic stories I’ve read my entire life. I would add that I’d been kicking around the idea of Cocoa being the catalyst for Earth’s entry into the interstellar community for 25 years, and finally brought this idea to fruition as the foundation for the first book.

How did you come up with the title of this book?

Blue Third is the series title, like Harry Potter, and each book has its own subtitle: Citlalli and the Destroyer, The Cocoa War, Chasing Time, Citlalli and the Dark, and lastly Seven of the Blue Third. Blue Third signifies Planet Earth. In the first book Earth becomes the long lost legendary home of Cocoa, with the whispered name Blue Third, and thus the series title. As for the subtitles, I am a big fan of classic science fiction books and movies from the ‘40s and ‘50s, and each title (including its font and slant on the cover) tries to reflect the spirit of those great titles of yesteryear.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

I didn’t start with a message, but since they’re written for all ages there is a consistent focus on teamwork, respecting others who are different than you, never giving up and overcoming great odds to succeed. Honestly, my main goal is for readers to have fun and get sucked into the story of these brave kids.

If you had to choose, is there a writer would you consider a mentor?

There are too many to name with many influences in these books. Harlan Ellison inspired my screenwriting and is definitely one of my primary influences. Others off the top of my head include Vonnegut, Tolkien, Bradbury, Pohl, Lovecraft, Wodehouse, Joe R. Lansdale, and way too many others. Having been told my writing is like James Patterson, I’ve read his Maximum Ride novels, which I enjoyed.

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator?

All the covers and titles were my ideas, with mockups I’d create for both front and back, and interpreted by the in-house artists at CreateSpace (my publisher) and approved by me. Perhaps someday I’ll be able to redo these with original artwork by a wonderful illustrator, but I’m very happy with them as is.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

I’m a classic late starter and wish I hadn’t taken twenty years off, so my advice is simple: Write. Get the bug and just do it as often as you can. And it’s never too late to start. I was 53 in 2009 as I started my first book, and three years later I’m completing book five. And the feeling is awesome.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

First of all, thank you to anyone who’s read my books. My daughter just started reading the first book to her class of second graders, admittedly a bit young, but apparently enthralled and enjoying the story very much, and are especially impressed that her Dad wrote it. For me that’s what I started writing for in the first place. Whether young or old, I hope anyone reading my books has a wonderful time and enjoys them just as I did when discovering reading so long ago.

Brad Blake
I’m a writer of young adult to adult adventure/science fiction as well as dark comedic screenplays.

The Blue Third series is published by CreateSpace and each is available on Amazon under “Blue Third”, both as hard copies and also on Kindle.

You can find the first three of the novels in this series via Smashwords where epub, mobi and other ebook reader formats are available.

No Wasted Ink Writer’s Links

It is another bright and sunny Monday morning and time for more No Wasted Ink Writer’s Links. There are a few new topics this week including writing post-tolkien, how to select a freelance editor, and a little about female heroes in writing. Enjoy!


There’s a $3 Sweet Spot For eBooks, But $6 eBooks Earn More – Smashwords

10 Reasons Why Twitter Is Great For Writers

Sign It Like Neil

Post-Tolkien Fantasy

Great Writers are Great Readers

Rip It Up And Start Again

New Year’s Resolution Reading List: 9 Books on Reading and Writing

Heroines Can Be Heroes, Too

Does Rejection Get You Down? Here’s How To Develop Resilience As A Freelance Writer

The Efficient Freelancer

Vetting an Independent Editor

Book Review: Another Fine Myth

Book Name: Another Fine Myth
Author: Robert Lynn Asprin
First Published: 1978

Robert Asprin was a resident of Chicago, a veteran of the United States Army and extremely active in science fiction fandom. Asprin was married twice and is survived by two children. In 1976, he was nominated for the Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation for The Capture, a cartoon slide show written by Robert Asprin and drawn by Phil Foglio. The late seventies proved to be his launch point as a writer. He began work as an editor by creating and editing Thieves World, an anthology of stories based on a single world. It was the first known project of this type to be done. He also published the first novel in his fantasy Myth Series that would continue to gain more additions until his death in 2008. Asprin was a prolific author with two famous series, the Myth Series and the Phule Company Series in addition the Thieves World Anthologies and many stand alone novels.

Another Fine Myth begins as Skeeve, a young thief turned sorcerer’s apprentice, is reluctantly thrust into a world of assassins, demons and dimensional hopping when his master, the wizard Garkin, is murdered. The boy is taken under the wing of Garkin’s “demon”, the reptilian being from the dimension of Perv. Aahz has lost his magic due to being sprinkled with joke powder during a summoning ritual and without Garkin, has little chance of regaining his powers. He still retains his knowledge of how to do magic. Aahz decides to continue Skeeve’s training as a wizard as together they attempt to thwart the evil Isstvan from taking over Skeeve’s homeworld of Klah with ample doses of humor along the way.

I don’t recall ever being as delighted with a novel as I was when I discovered Another Fine Myth during its first printing in the late 1970s. I was a student who was addicted to reading and fantasy/sci-fi novels were my favorite choices. This quick paced story is filled with humor, puns and play on words that keep you in stitches. I would eagerly await each new installment as Mr. Asprin created them and enjoyed each light-hearten and even corny addition with few disappointments. Even now, as an adult, I remember his books with a high degree of fondness. If you haven’t read the Myth Series by Asprin, you are in for a rare treat. Start with this one, number one in the series and look forward to a laughable good time. This is not literature by any means, but quick-paced fun entertainment that is going to stick with you down through the years.

The series order is as follows:

  • Another Fine Myth (1978)
  • Myth Conceptions (1980)
  • Myth Directions (1982)
  • Hit or Myth (1983)
  • Myth-ing Persons (1984)
  • Little Myth Marker (1985)
  • M.Y.T.H. Inc. Link (1986)
  • Myth-Nomers and Im-Pervections (1987)
  • M.Y.T.H. Inc. in Action (1990)
  • Sweet Myth-tery of Life (1993)
  • Myth-Ion Improbable (2001)
  • Something M.Y.T.H. Inc. (2002)
  • Myth-told Tales (2003) with Jody Lynn Nye
  • Myth Alliances (2003) with Jody Lynn Nye
  • Myth-taken Identity (2004) with Jody Lynn Nye
  • Class Dis-Mythed (2005) with Jody Lynn Nye
  • Myth-Gotten Gains (2006) with Jody Lynn Nye
  • Myth-Chief (2008) with Jody Lynn Nye
  • Myth-Fortunes (2008) with Jody Lynn Nye
  • Another Fine Myth Book CoverThis novel has had a recent reprinting in 2005 and is easy to find at most major book sellers. The Myth Series have been picked up by three publishing companies over the years: Donning Starblaze, Meisha Merlin and, as of 2008, Wildside Press.

    Serendipity Magazine Article – Symbols in Time

    In August of 2011, I received my certification as a gemologist from Santiago Canyon College in Southern California. My course of study took three years and I was trained in the identification of colored stones, diamonds, pearls and antique jewelry. Today marks the debut of my first gemological related magazine article. Please visit Serendipity Magazine today and read Symbols in Time. It is one of many interesting articles about the creation and viewpoints of art.

    Art Drawing of Victorian Era CameoSerendipity Magazine
    Symbols in Art Vol. I Issue 4
    Symbols in Time is on page 85

    Symbols in Time is about the symbols that marked antique jewelry from the Victorian period complete with example photos from the private jewelry collection of Roberta Mullings, GG.

    No Wasted Ink Writer’s Links

    Every Monday I look forward to sharing the various writing related links that have caught my eye during the week. From blogging, to marketing, to tips on how to make your writing project sing…it is all here. Enjoy!


    eReaders: My Take On Them

    How to Finish Writing a Novel

    The Importance of Good Marketing

    What the Heck is an Em Dash?

    Writing Tips

    Managing Stage Directions In Your Novel

    36 Adjectives Describing Light

    Misconceptions About Romance

    How to Read a Book Contract – Agency Clause

    Where’s Your Line in the Sand?

    Think Proofreading Isn’t Important? Think Again…

    Author Interviews * Book Reviews * Essays * Writer's Links * Scifaiku

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