No Wasted Ink Writer’s Links

There was an explosion of great articles to link to this week and I had a hard time choosing among them. From why you need business cards to dealing with writer’s block. I hope you like this week’s offerings.


Why You Need Professionally Printed Business Cards

How To Plot Without Plotting

This Business of Writing: Recordkeeping

When Words Wither: Dealing with Writer’s Block

In Love With Language

How to Market Nonfiction Books with Articles – Online and in Print

A Simple Novel Outline – 9 questions for 25 chapters

Writing Workflow – How to use ipad with Scrivener

3 Reasons to Have a Website If You’re Unpublished

Facebook Page for Authors and Screenwriters

Soundtrack of Writing: How to Use Your Ipod to Create Mood

I’ve been a participate of NaNoWriMo for the past five years. I was not successful in my word count goals every year, but it gave me the support I needed to start writing and to continue to write. In addition to learning about various software and hardware options to enhance my writing experience from the other writers, I also discovered the concept of learning to write while listening to music on your ipod. There are several advantages to this habit.

1. Social Convention. When you are seated in a coffeehouse with earbuds in your ear, people are less likely to interrupt you. The earbud has become a signal of “do not disturb” in public settings.

2. Blocking Out Noise. The ipod blocks out the general noise of the public place you are writing in. There are fewer annoying conversations to slip into your creative state and the sounds of the coffee bar blenders are blocked.

3. Mood Enhancement. Perhaps the biggest advantage, is that the music you choose creates a mood to enhance your writing. When we go to the movies, the soundtrack helps gives us the audience aural cues as to what is happening. The characters all have their own themes and different kinds of scenes are accompanied with different scores to create the mood of the film. We can use these same soundtracks to create similar moods in our minds while writing.

My local NaNoWriMo group has approximately 35 participates and I put up a poll among them to ask what their favorite writing soundtracks were. The majority of them are college aged writers and their age does influence their choices of music, but after reviewing their selections, I discovered a wealth of lush, emotive scores that are clearly above the norm. Here is the list of recommended movie soundtracks from that group.

Hans Zimmer’s Inception
John Powell’s How to Train Your Dragon
Dario Marianelli’s Pride and Prejudice
Howard Shore’s Lord of the Rings (all three movies)
Hans Zimmer’s The Holiday
James Newton Howard’s Peter Pan
Hans Zimmer’s Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl
Michael Giacchino’s Star Trek XI
Mark Knopfler’s The Princess Bride
Various artists Down with Love
Hans Zimmer’s Sherlock Holmes I
Howard Shore’s Eastern Promises
Various Artists Garden State
John Williams’ Star Wars: The Revenge of the Sith
Michael Giacchino’s John Carter

Book Review: Beat to Quarters

Book Name: Beat To Quarters
Author: C.S. Forester
First Published: 1937

C.S. Forester was a former medical student who wished to become a writer. In 1927, he bought several volumes of The Naval Chronicle, that detailed the professional topics of the Royal Navy during the time of the conflict with Napoleon. Voyaging on a small freighter, he traveled from California to Central America and spent his time reading these books, soaking up all the articles on strategy, gunnery, and seamanship by professional seamen of that time period. By the time that his travels brought him back to England, Forester had plotted his famous novel about the mission of Horatio Hornblower, Beat to Quarters. It would publish in 1937 and would soon be followed by two more books, A Ship of the Line and Flying Colours. In 1939, all three would appear together in one volume as Captain Horatio Hornblower. In 1951, Beat to Quarters would be the source material for the movie Horatio Hornblower starring Gregory Peck.

The novel is about a secret mission to South America by 37 year old Captain Horatio Hornblower. The Admiralty has ordered the thirty-six-gun HMS Lydia and her captain to support a Spanish rebel in order to disrupt the Spanish naval presence in the area. This presence takes the form of a fifty gun ship of the line known as Natividad. Hornblower is ordered “to take, sink, burn or destroy” this vessel that vastly outguns his own ship. The captain soon discovers that the Spanish noble he was sent to support has lost his mind. El Supremo, as he calls himself, believes he is a god and will tolerate nothing but absolute obedience to his will.

Captain Hornblower manages to negate the situation of being allied with a madman and sets out to seek and destroy the Natividad. The Lydia faces this superior ship twice, once in a smartly done night action and a second battle at sea with the two ships exchanging broadsides in a battle to the death.

Weary of battle, Hornblower prepares to return to England. Stopping in Panama for supplies, he is persuaded to take on a passenger for transport, a Lady Barbara Wellesley. Finding the lady to be an excellent whist player and charming companion, the married captain suddenly finds himself engaged in an altogether different kind of battle, one that could sink his heart.

I fell in love years ago with the Horatio Hornblower saga when A&E created its mini-series based on the book series. Strangely, the mini-series did not cover what is considered the defining novel of the saga which is the first book written by Forester, Beat to Quarters. When I set about reading the books, I started with this one and then read A Ship of the Line and Flying Colours. After the main trilogy is read, the books can be consumed in any order. Most of the stories first appeared in serial form in the Saturday Evening Post before becoming novels, which accounts for their stand alone quality. Beat to Quarters is my favorite of the Hornblower saga and should not be missed. It will turn you into a true fan of historical fiction.

Where to find the Book:

You can find Beat to Quarters by C.S. Forester on GoodReads.

No Wasted Ink Writer’s Links

I have a nice assortment of writer theme links for you this week. Some feature scrivener, my favorite writing program and others are general writing tips or marketing tips for writers. Enjoy!


Why I use Scrivener for business writing

Word Count: Murdering Your Darlings and King’s 10% Rule

Tab Fancy – Dividers for Filofax

3 Myths of Guest Writing for Big Websites … and 6 Tactics for Doing it Well

5 Strategies For Reviving Your Freelance Marketing Plan

Enhance Your Freelance Writing Career with These 5 Tips

The End of an Era for “The Encyclopedia Britannica”

How to Read a Book Contract – Contempt

How To Boost Your Writing Confidence

Can the Right Tools Help You Write Better?

Book Review: Persuasion

Book Name: Persuasion
Author: Jane Austen
First Published: 1818

Jane Austen was forty years old when she penned her last complete novel, Persuasion. Her health was failing as she wrote and she would die at the young age of 41 before this novel would see print. Persuasion was bundled together with an earlier novel, Northanger Abby, and would prove to be her biggest bestseller. It was also the first of her novels to be published under her real name. Previously, all her novels had been written by the pen name “a lady”. While Persuasion lacks some of the polish of her earlier works due to the little time she had left to revise it to perfection, there are many who claim that it is her finest novel and most mature work of all. Persuasion has not been out of print for at least 150 years and is considered in the public domain.

Until this novel, Austen had always taken as her heroine a young inexperienced woman, falling in love for the first time. In Persuasion, Anne Elliot is twenty-seven years old, a spinster with common sense and decency, but with a beaten spirit. For her, love is something that belongs to her past, not the present. Before the novel opens, Anne is briefly engaged to marry a young naval officer, Frederick Wentworth, but was persuaded to break off the understanding by her god-mother for reasons of prudence. She has spent the last eight years regretting this decision, and she does not expect to discover love again.

At the opening of the novel, Sir Walter Elliot, a vain and imprudent baronet, must rent his country house and move himself and his family to Bath to pay off his debts. Where once he and his three daughters were rich and respected, now they are poor and the subject of ridicule. His new tenants are Admiral Croft and his wife, Captain Wentworth’s sister. The pair move into Anne’s former home and invite Wentworth to join them. The tables have turned on the fortunes of Captain Wentworth, where once he was a poor navel officer with dubious prospects, now he is wealthy and an eligible bachelor. Being paid off by the navy, he is of a mind to settle down with the “first woman between 15 and 30” to catch his eye. Anyone, that is, except for Anne Elliot, the woman who had broken his heart.

Anne remains in the area to care for her ill sister, Mary Musgrove and tend to her nephews. Time has not been kind to Anne and she has become wane and thin, exhaustion taking its toll on her appearance. Anne and Captain Wentworth meet again due to proximity. The captain treats Anne with cool formality as he flirts with Mary’s two sister-in-laws. The younger women hero-worship Wentworth as they vie for his attentions, each hoping to capture his heart. At the same time, Anne notices small gestures of kindness in Wentworth’s behavior toward her, as if he can not bear to see her in discomfort, gestures that pull the spinster into a private mix of hopeless pleasure and pain, as Anne realizes that she still loves the captain.

During a two-day visit to the village of Lyme, the Musgroves and Anne meet the naval friends of Captain Wentworth and are charmed by their warmth and hospitality. Released from her obligations and refreshed by the sea air, Anne begins to regain some of her youthful complexion. This is noticed by not only Wentworth, but she is admired by other gentlemen in the village. The party’s visit is brought short by an accident on the Cobb and it is Anne’s common sense that saves the day.

After the visit to Lyme, Anne rejoins her father and elder sister in Bath, convinced that Captain Wentworth is to marry another woman. She takes the addresses of her cousin, William Elliot more seriously as she tries to move on with her life. Bath’s society paint the two as all but engaged. Then word comes that Wentworth and his intended have parted and she finds that the captain has suddenly arrived in Bath. Anne is overjoyed that this might mean she has a second chance at happiness with her captain, but how is she to let him know that he still is in her heart and that she has not accepted William Elliot’s offer of marriage? Would the captain risk making a second offer to her after she had refused him all those years ago?

Attempting to branch out my reading habits from a steady diet of science fiction and fantasy novels, I found a list of classic literature that I decided to use to guide my choice of novels from the local library. One of the authors on this list was Jane Austen. I could not decide which of her novels to begin with and because Sense and Sensibility and Pride and Prejudice were not available in the public library, I picked up Persuasion to be the first to cross off my list of recommended Austen classics. Opening the book, I found myself lost in a world of loneliness, sadness and of the hope of a second chance, not only by this quiet young woman, but by a dashing naval captain who was all to human in his hurt and memories of the past. I not only found myself in sympathy with Anne Elliot, but I was fascinated by the culture of the time. The breaking down of the tradition English class system, the elevation of men based on their merits instead of their birth, and the pride that the English people had in their navy. Persuasion reads today as a historical novel with contemporary overtones although it was penned during the Regency period itself. The characters are timeless and the situations as believable today as they were over 200 years ago. I’ve gone on to read all of Austen’s novels, but Persuasion remains my favorite of all her works and to my belief, is the most romantic of them all.

Persuasion Book CoverYou may find Persuasion at Project Gutenberg and in your local library.

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