Tag Archives: author interview

Author Interview: Shidorr Myirck-Gayer

One of the pleasures of the author interview series on No Wasted Ink is the chance to meet and learn about new authors and what motivated them to begin writing. I hope you’ll find Shidorr’s story as interesting as I did.

Author Shidorr Myirck-GayerHello, my name is Shidorr Myirck-Gayer. I currently live in the North Suburbs of the Chicago land area. I grew up in Chicago with the
dream of becoming an actress. I performed in a few plays and was an extra in a few movies, one such as Spiderman 2. It was an amazing experience. Sadly I never made it any further; life got in the way… I guess. In the middle of pursuing my dream as an actress, I wrote poetry and stories. At the time, I didn’t realize that writing is where my true journey rests. I have always been interested in the world of creating tales. Pulling people in my fictional fantasies.

When and why did you begin writing?

The tragedy that consumed me ultimately pushed me into the society of published authors. Depression made me write my first novel. Her Name
is Grace
. In 2010 I had lost another child in the early months of my pregnancy. Writing was my way of dealing with my sadness.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I first considered myself as a writer, when I became published. I didn’t think the work I created counted until now.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

I must say, I had to laugh a little bit at this question. Every time someone asks me what my book is about. I can never shorten it enough,
for a quick answer. Okay, here goes…

My story is about a young girl named Grace, who grows up on a planet that’s inhabited by angels. Her and her best friend, Max, is being
trained to one day become angels themselves. The angels on the planet Mahlai hope that increasing their numbers can end the slavery war on
Earth. They also have to defend their planet against the dark angels who seek to kidnap the trainees and destroy the world of men. In this
tale Grace and Max finds discovers a powerful tool that the angels use to watch over the humans. This tool changes Grace and Max
personalities. Grace falls in love with a human and Max takes a turn for the worst.

What inspired you to write this book?

My husband’s support helped me achieve my goal of finishing the first book, of a 3 book series.

Do you have a specific writing style?

I don’t really have a writing style. I can confirm that no matter how hard I try. I can’t write the book in order. I always start on a mid
chapter first.

How did you come up with the title of this book?

I just love the name, Grace. I had a cat named that once.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

There is no message; I just want my readers to live in a world unlike their own.

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

I must say, I create my characters based on people that I know and books that I have read. For example, I have quotes from the bible and
my angels are lightly based on angels of the bible. Author Kristin Cashore depicts strong female characters in her novels and I love
that. The backdrop of my stories comes from my travels and my daydreams.

What authors have most influenced your life?

My favorite Authors are, Kristin Cashore, Suzanne Collins and John of the bible.

If you had to choose, is there a writer would you consider a mentor?

If I had to choose a mentor, it would be Kristin Cashore. Meeting her
in person confirms that.

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator?

My cover designer is John Konecny. He is an amazing artist, easy to work with and he understands what you want.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

The advice that I would give is the advice that is said over and over
again to writers, KEEP WRITING! This really does help you when you
think your work is not good enough. When you get writers block and
especially when you began to doubt yourself.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

To all my readers, Thank You for your support and I’ll try my best to
make the next book an even better adventure!

Her Name is Grace - book coverShidoor Myinck-Gayer
Her Name is Grace

Book Cover by John Konecny.

Author Interview: Rosemary Lynch

Sometimes the cover art of a book catches the eye and it was certainly the case with me when I first saw Rose’s novel. After we chatted for a time on twitter, I invited her here to No Wasted Ink for an interview.

Author Rosemary LynchHi my name is Rosemary Lynch (Rose). I was born on 14th August 1970 in Merton, England. I am married to Paul, have three lovely children. Charlotte, Melissa and Jake. Two dogs, Max and Arweyn, one cat Maggie, three chickens Bluebell, Lavender and Meadow. I write epic fantasy. My first book Kainan, is a magical romantic adventure. The first book in the Deragan Sword Trilogy. The second book, ‘Meladrom’ is out on the 14th August this year and the conclusion book three, ‘Annalise’ is due out Decemer 2012. I love to write and I love art, especially painting in acrylic. I love to paint dragons!

When and why did you begin writing?

I began writing in May 2009, whilst off work due to an injury.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

When Kainan was read for the first time last year. Up to then it had been my private hobby. I was nagged by colleagues at work to let them read it, so I had ten proof books printed. I was overwhelmed by the response so I decided I would have Kainan published.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

Kainan is a magical romantic adventure fantasy. It is the story of a young man whose life is dramatically changed overnight when his village is attacked by the evil Gozars. He is forced into stealing a magical crystal from the world of Malgar, which unbenown to him, is the lifeforce of their world. Left for dead by the Gorzars, his life is saved by a young groundling woman, Arweyn. Together they discover the truth about his heritage and set in play an ancient prophecy. They head out on a quest to return the Ardor Crystal to the world of Malgar and stop the return of the Gorzar Empire. Along the way they face treachery, many mystical creatures, and fall in love.

What inspired you to write this book?

I had a dream and that dream was my first book ‘Kainan’. It all started from there and I haven’t stopped since.

Do you have a specific writing style?

I like to write quite fast paced with lots of action.

How did you come up with the title of this book?

This book had many titles before I settled on Kainan, as did the hero’s name. I wanted a strong, stand alone title. I discovered the name Kainan and as soon as I heard it, I knew immediately that it fitted his character perfectly.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Never to give up hope. Even when life is at rock bottom.

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

I think there is probably some of my husband within Kainan’s character! His querky sense of humour and practical jokes for a start!

What authors have most influenced your life?

When I was young it was Enid Blyton, I spent hours in one of her books, sat up a tree in the garden. Now I love Terry Brooks, and Terry Goodkind.

If you had to choose, is there a writer would you consider a mentor?

Terry Brooks

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator?

Aidana Willow Raven. I sent out a tweet saying I was looking for an illustrator. She contacted me and the minute I saw her work I new she was the one to produce my cover. Her work is amazing.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

Just follow your heart and enjoy what you do. Don’t be afraid to ask for help.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Firstly I want to thank them for buying my book! I love Kainan, even though I have written it, I still enjoy reading it! It is an easy book to read, and it takes you right into their world. You feel their pain, their passion, their drive. You find yourself wanting to turn the next page to see what happens to them.

Deragan Sword Prophecy - Kainan book coverRosemary Lynch
Wiltshire, England. UK

Illustrator: Aidana Willow Raven

SMASHWORDS
AMAZON USA
AMAZON UK

Author Interview – Shelia Bolt Rudesill

After exchanging many tweets on Twitter, I became acquainted with Shelia and her artisan husband Bud. Shelia is a great example of a woman shifting into writing as a new career instead of retiring and lends to her novels a great deal of real life experience. I’m pleased to feature literary fiction author Shelia Bolt Rudesill here on No Wasted Ink.

Shelia Rudesill - AuthorMy name is Shelia Bolt Rudesill. For forty-five years as a pediatric and NICU nurse I dedicated my professional life to the well being of children and acquired a tremendous empathy for those burdened with unreasonable hardships. It’s from those experiences that I piece together my stories. As a nurse I was able to touch a life every day. I’d like to think that I can still do that through my writing.

Both my artist husband, Bud Rudesill, and I became accidental writers well into our fifties. It’s amazing how much we enjoy the craft and more amazing to realize how many writer friends we have.

When and why did you begin writing?

Writing came as a surprise. After many years of nursing, I burned out and Bud and I moved from North Carolina to Wyoming for a fresh start. The Oregon Trail interested me and I got to wondering about the kids who’d trekked across the entire country until the soles of their shoes wore away. My imagination went wild and I created three frontier dolls, each with a story of their own—the first as a journal, the second as a collection of letters, and the last as a novella. With the local success of that project I came up with a second idea to weave stories of my nursing career into a full-fledged novel. When I told Bud about my idea he told me that I’d never pull it off. Months later on a seven hour road trip, I drove while Bud read my manuscript, Child of My Heart. He cried all the way. The emotional aspect of the story had caught him off guard. That night the wife of the friends we were visiting stayed up all night reading. “It was so good,” she’d said, “I couldn’t put it down.” Believe me those are the words a writer wants to hear!

Once Child was published Bud told me that my Oregon Trail children needed to grow up and that my three children’s books needed to be an historical fiction saga. So, my second novel was born: Auspicious Dreams.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

While writing my first novel, “Child of My Heart,” I attended a writer’s conference. Part of the fee included a manuscript consultation and entry into a writing contest. My heart sank when I looked at the hundreds of red ink marks on my manuscript. I quickly put it away feeling like a failure. To my great surprise I was awarded the last of the five honorable mentions. On the plane home I pulled out my manuscript. The first thing I read was the last red mark on the last page, “My biggest disdain is having to put down this manuscript. The story is powerful. Nothing short of superb.” It was at that moment I considered myself a writer.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

Transmutare is a story of three carefree young women who get caught up in some pretty terrible experiences. The protagonist is a former Orthodox Jew, the second is a Jewish agnostic, and the third is Roman Catholic. Together they attempt to define a god who has allowed their world to spin out of control. What I like about this story is that a lot of people will identify with their struggles.

What inspired you to write this book?

I’m always inspired by people who overcome unbearable hardships.

Do you have a specific writing style?

Literary fiction

How did you come up with the title of this book?

My protagonist, Shelli, changes from an almost perfect girl to one who no one knows. She “transforms” or undergoes a “transformation” or “mutation.” Transmutare is French for transformation. I liked the sound of it.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Definitely. Transmutare is ultimately a quest for the meaning of life, as well as a gritty struggle for physical and spiritual survival. How the characters deal with their conflicts allows each reader to interpret the spiritual directions the girls take within their own set of beliefs. In other words, the story doesn’t teach or preach.

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

I once had an acquaintance who went away for a weekend. When she returned she was a completely different person. I never found out what happened to her so I made up something I thought could have happened.

What authors have most influenced your life?

C.S. Lewis, Maya Angelou, Sue Monk Kidd, Ann Patchett, Toni Morrison, Cynthia Rylant, David Guterson, Arundhati Roy, David Wroblewski. When I read any of these authors I’m completely pulled into the worlds they create and most times transformed by them.

If you had to choose, is there a writer would you consider a mentor?

Maya Angelou because she’s so real and timeless. Her stories and poems come straight from the heart and she tells them with honesty. I think she could teach me to become more lyrical as well as a better person.

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator?

I did. The cover photo is my great-niece and was taken several years ago with her cell phone. I was attracted to the defiant expression. This is my protagonist in the depth of her transformation. The grainy resolution of the photo and the fading gray background added to the despair in the middle parts of the story.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

Just write what’s in your heart. Don’t try to please anyone but yourself. Your writing is your legacy. Be true to yourself. Some of the first advice I received as an author was: Write what you know. That advice hasn’t failed me yet.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Just thanks for the applause and the criticism. I need to hear both. I appreciate every single person who has purchased one of my novels and it warms my heart when they write a review on Amazon or their own webpage.

Transmutare Book CoverShelia Bolt Rudesill
Pittsboro, North Carolina

“I’m not retired. I’m a writer.” After a long day of writing and editing or assisting Bud with photo shoots, I admit to a weakness for dry martinis and dancing with my cats The Artful Dodger and Q.

Novels:
Transmutare
Baggage
Auspicious Dreams
Child of My Heart

WebsiteBook Trailer

Transmutare, available in paperback at Amazon.com by Create Space and as an eBook at Amazon.com by Kindle

Author Interview: Sara King

I first was introduced to Sara King’s writing when I happened upon a draft her novel Outer Bounds on a writing review site that we both frequent. I wrote an editorial review of the first chapter of her book and asked if she would send me the rest so I could find out what would happen next. We’ve stayed in touch via facebook ever since. With her latest novel about to drop on Amazon, I thought it a good time to introduce this intrepid author to you here on No Wasted Ink.

Author Sara KingMy name is Sara King. Really. And no, I’m not related to Stephen King, though his writing was a very strong influence on me in my early years. I’m a 29-year-old born and raised Alaskan, who’s known since she was a toddler that she was going to be a writer when she grew up. Unlike all the other would-be astronauts, paleontologists, and fish biologists out there, no one really managed to dissuade me from that particular hare-brained notion, so here I am. To give you an example of how stubborn and single-minded I’ve been about the whole writing affair, when I was explaining to my agent that I wanted to release one of my series of books out of order, he laughed and blinked at me and said, “You’re not George Lucas, Sara.” And the first thing that flashed into my mind? “YET!!”

When and why did you begin writing?

I wrote my first documented story when I was 4. I know, because my grandmother dated Sammy the Snake and stuck it in a file folder in her dresser, about six pages long, with plenty of illustrated curly-cues of snakes that looked like twisty wads of poop. I say my first ‘documented’ because I wrote more before that, including Bob the Brontosaurus, which I lovingly stapled together while destroying my mother’s favorite stapler by standing on it when regular means would not suffice, but I’m afraid that my mother’s filing habits are not as complete, and Bob is probably a goner.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

As soon as I decided that’s what I was going to be. I knew as a really young kid that I had to be an entertainer of some sort, and looking back, I judged all the positives and negatives of each entertainment profession with kind of creepily-mature decision-making skills. Writing, I decided, had the best collection of traits that I was looking for. It meant I could work from home—any home I wanted, anywhere—it had great opportunities for making a buck, it had huge pre-existing networks in which I could disseminate my ideas, it left me with no huge need to be under intense public scrutiny, and it was something I could basically teach myself to do. I chose writing over art because I felt writing had a bigger chance of making more money and going viral. This all when I was 3 or 4. From that point on, I started teaching myself to write, in earnest.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

Alaskan Fury is about a Fury who, 3000 years ago, was told by her Lord to go kill a djinni. The Fury won the duel (think a sword-slinging, super-powered Batman going up against Shakespeare) and the djinni, hoping to prolong his life, submitted, binding himself to her for 3 wishes. The Fury raised her sword to kill him anyway, and, out of desperation, realizing she wasn’t going to take his bribe, the djinni cursed her never to commit violence (a Fury’s stock-in-trade). The book starts with 3000 years of bitterness and despair from their predicament already tainting their every action. It begins when the two of them finally hit rock-bottom, and is about the love story that develops from there.

Do you have a specific writing style?

Actually, yes. I am one of those freakish authors that subscribes fully to the Butterfly Effect. (i.e. The Pull It Out Of Your Ass Syndrome) This wreaks hell with my ability to edit or plot out a story, but it draws people along like nobody’s business. I’d say 1/100 of the authors I know write this way. Stephen King is a perfect example of a writer who writes like this. Basically, the characters will lead you along from beginning to end, so that you never get bored, but the plot doesn’t have perfect arcs and there are random tangents. I have always—ALWAYS—found myself unable to write based on a plot outline. I always take the tangents, always. For years, I agonized over it, but still couldn’t stop myself, even after I’d spent weeks on an outline…I’d throw it all away to take a single interesting tangent in the first 20 minutes because my characters said or did something that was unexpected. So, after about 5 years of struggling to write based on what I was told I had to do, I finally just gave in to that random-ass thrill-seeker part of me and stopped trying to conform. That was when I was 11. Immediately after, I finished my first novel at the age of 12. I think it was 145k words, or something like that, and you can imagine that I thought it was the cat’s meow. (shudder)

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Alaskan Fury takes place in (gasp!) Alaska. I was born and raised here, so I can get pretty detailed without someone screaming ‘hack.’ The characters are me. I’ll blatantly admit it. I pick a facet of myself and channel that baby onto paper, then switch POVs and pick another one. Though I often use what I have observed of other people in my writing, in Fury, it’s pretty much all me except for the dragon. The dragon was based off of my fiancé and his curious—but cute!!—hoarding instinct. Anything valuable or shiny is fair game.

What authors have most influenced your life?

I’m going to revise your question a bit to ask which ‘storytellers’ have most influenced my life, because I spent a great portion of my life (and still do!) analyzing great storytellers and a great story isn’t just told via books. So here goes, in no particular order: Tom Brion, George Lucas, Joss Whedon, Anne McCaffery, Orson Scott Card, Stephen King, George R. R. Martin. You guys, I bow to you. Tom Brion is my grandfather, who can spin a tale that holds an entire room enraptured, from whom I literally learned all the basics of good storytelling as I sat on his knee, listening to him tell tales of his misadventures in Alaska beginning when I was a wee ‘human bean.’ Oh, and I would totally grovel at Martin’s feet, if he would let me. Arya is my favorite character of all time, followed closely by Jaime. Now that man can write…

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator?

My fiancé, David MacKey, did the cover. He’s normally a comic illustrator, but I kind of drafted him for this purpose because I love his art and I don’t mind being different. As to how I selected him, he basically selected me. The poor guy read my sci-fi novel Outer Bounds by random accident on the internet, felt compelled to look me up, had a little mini-freakout session with some of his friends when he realized I was single, then politely asked me if I’d like to chat. I think I told him to screw off a few times, but he was persistent…

Do you have any advice for other writers?

Your first novel is going to suck. Keep writing. Then write more. Then write some more. And then more. Do NOT get stuck on your first novel, thinking that’s going to be the best thing you ever write. It will be, bar none, your WORST. Keep analyzing your style and comparing it to what you like about other authors. Figure out how it ticks, then replicate it. Don’t concern yourself overly much with books on how to write. Most of them aren’t written by writers. Use your gut instinct as a READER to tell you what’s going to go over well as a WRITER, and then let all the egg-heads who write their 101 Simple Steps On How To Write The Perfect Novel In 5 Days—written by, I might add, people whose name you’ve never heard of—sell their books to the people who are insecure enough to think they need them. Storytelling is instinctive. You can teach yourself, esp. if you use a batch of first-readers to ‘shotgun’ their criticisms of your work and then analyze that, too. Clusters of comments citing the same problem generally means it’s something you need to address. If it’s a single comment here or there, it’s probably an outlier, so ignore it. Probably around book 4 or 5, you’re going to really start getting the hang of things.

Basically, with writing, everybody thinks they’re an expert, but it is my firm belief that the absolute best people you can get to help you with your work are people who hate to write, but love to read, and love to read the same types of books that you like to write. New writers are often very good at quoting the ‘rules’ without really looking much deeper and seeing the Grand Picture, and are hyper-critical and often wrong. When you’re looking for critiques, stick to readers who don’t write. You’ll get a better gut-instinct reaction, versus an ‘I read this’ reaction. Just because somebody with a couple of letters behind their name put one of their ideas down in a book does not mean it’s a good idea, but new writers, who are desperately seeking the Gospel that will transform their writing overnight into a huge success with little effort on their part, don’t have the confidence or experience to see that. That said, read Stephen King’s On Writing. You’ll love it.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

I had a world-famous agent for about 4 years, after which, I broke off and decided to do my own thing. Edging your way into the traditional publishing system right now is ridiculously difficult if you’re a new author. Therefore, I’m stepping into the bold new world of e-publishing all on my lonesome, but I expect to be a great success. If romance isn’t really your thing, keep an eye out for my sci-fi and fantasy series. I’ve had them written for years, but they’ve been sitting on my hard-drive for much too long, languishing as I waited for some traditional editor to take notice. I’m finally to the point where, since I know that I can make a decent living at this without waiting around with my thumb up my ass for some editor to notice me, I’m going to start publishing my own stories on Amazon. If you’d like to stay updated on this utterly brazen—and some say foolhardy—endeavor, you can find me on Facebook or Email Me. My first book, Alaskan Fire, came out at the end of January, and it currently has 18 5-star reviews. In my opinion, Alaskan Fury is even better, by far.

Alaska Fury Book CoverSara King was four years old when she wrote her first short story. Seventeen years later, she is currently working on her 16th book, the third novel in the Guardians of the First Realm Alaskan Paranormal world.  Sara lives in Alaska with her soul mate and biggest fan, David. 
Cover art by: David MacKey
Alaskan Fire: Amazon Kindle Store (currently at 18 5-star reviews!!)
Alaskan Fury: Amazon Kindle Store