Tag Archives: author

Writing Tips by Avril Sabine

Creating a story isn’t just about sitting down and pouring words onto the page. You need to fill your ‘toolbox’ with the right tools. There’s no need to start from scratch trying to figure out the techniques of those who’ve gone before you. Learn the skills other writers have figured out through the ages and build on them with your own discoveries about the craft.

But remember, “it’s not logical to think that all advice fits all writers and all writing projects at all times even through much advice fits many writers and many situations much of the time.” (Beth Hill, Editor.)

Grammar, Spelling And Word Choice

Grammar is the structural foundation that allows us to express ourselves in a way to allow others to understand what we’re trying to say. Spelling allows the reader to recognise and understand the words we’re trying to use and help make the meaning of the story clearer. Particularly when it comes to homophones. When choosing the right words for your story you don’t want to sound like you’ve used a thesaurus in every sentence. Nor do you want to use the same word repetitively so the reader becomes sick of seeing it. Finding the correct balance is extremely important.

Sentence Structure

Sentence structure isn’t just about the grammatical aspects of it such as whether it is a simple, compound, complex or compound-complex sentence. This is important to understand, but what is more important is to learn how the different structures make the reader feel. Short sentences can make a story race forward and create high tension moments. Longer sentences have a more relaxed feel to them. You do of course want to vary your sentence lengths. Learning how to use sentence structure to change pace, create emotion and draw readers into your story is important.

Peers

People form groups with other likeminded people. In business, sports and other social activities. Yet often they’re hesitant to do the same when it comes to their writing. Groups are great in that where one member may be lacking the skills in a particular area, another member might have those skill and be able to share some of their knowledge. There’s also nothing to say you can be a member of only one writing group. There are many groups all focusing on different aspects of writing. Both online and in person. Some groups focus on different genres, some on the techniques of writing, some on short stories. It can take time to find the right groups suited to your writing needs.

Reading the works of other writers can also help teach you the way books are created. And I’m not talking about how-to books. Studying other books in the genre/s you wish to write in can teach you a lot of techniques that can be used in your own writing. When it comes to learning from other writers using this method it’s important you only use the techniques you’ve learned from them and not plagiarise their work.

Research

Even those who write fantasy need to learn how to research. If you’ve loosely based your world on a period in history you’ll want to learn the logistics of living in such a time period. If horses are your method of transport, or even a completely made up animal, you can research horses or something similar to give you an idea of the care and abilities of that animal. What ground can your transport cover in an hour? A day? Does it need rest, or if it’s mechanical, what sort of maintenance does it need? Researching actual objects similar to what your own fantastical object is like can help create a more realistic and probable object.

If you’re writing something set in the real world it’s even more important to get your facts right. Whether it’s location, a historical event or a job. There’s sure to be a reader out there somewhere who knows the subject you’re discussing and will point out the mistakes.

Voice

A writer’s voice is their own particular style that sets their work apart from other authors. It’s a mixture of everything that goes into their story including characterization, sentence structure, grammar, topics, pace, word choices, POV choices, and influences. It can take a lot of time, even years, to develop your own voice. Quite often it develops once you’ve learned many of the rules about writing and understand how they can be used as well as when they can be broken. Once you have all those basic tools, you can start to develop the more complex ones such as voice.

Creativity

It’s important to learn how to write and understand how other great writers create their stories, but it’s also important to sometimes ignore the rules. Let yourself be creative. Let yourself explore different types of writing and unusual ideas. Not every piece of writing has to become a story. Practicing and exercising your craft is equally important. Make notes about your ideas so you don’t forget them and go over your notes sometimes and see if one of your old ideas is urging you to write about it. Give yourself permission to try something even if everyone tells you it won’t work. It might not work, but you might surprise yourself and learn a little bit more about your own methods of writing.

Experiences

Never underestimate the experiences that have occurred in your life. Even if you think they’re ordinary. Those experiences are unique to you and even if someone else has also gone through the exact same event, there’s a good chance they wouldn’t have experienced it exactly as you did. You can use those emotions, feelings and events to help understand other emotions, feelings and events. To draw conclusions about other occurrences or even use the event exactly as you experienced it. When writing different scenes in your story you can think back over past events and draw on them to add another layer of authenticity to your work. I’m sure most people have, at different times in their lives, experienced love, hate, frustration, satisfaction, failure, success, compassion and heartlessness. Relive those experiences. Understand them and allow your characters to feel them too. Taking into account their unique personalities, how would your different characters have reacted in those situations?


Avril Sabine is an Australian author who writes mostly young adult and children’s speculative fiction. She has been writing since she was a young child and wanted to be an author the moment she realized someone wrote the books she loved to read. Avril is the author of more than seventy books, including Guardians Of The Round Table series, Dragon Blood series, Realms Of The Fae series, Elf Sight and The Irish Wizard.

Website: http://www.avrilsabine.com/
Amazon Author Page: http://www.amazon.com/author/avrilsabine

No Wasted Ink Writers Links

Welcome to No Wasted Ink’s writer links. Every Monday I post a top ten list of writer-related articles that I found surfing the internet that I felt were noteworthy I hope you enjoy them as much as I did.

When the Book Takes Over Everything

Seven Stories With Contrived Character Conflict

Motivation for Character Arc: A Different Approach

How To Turn Your Novel Into A TV Series

8 STEPS TO SURVIVING AN AUTHOR READING

Leave a Message at the Tone: Setting the Right Tone for Your Novel

How does an independent bookstore survive for 90 years?

Our Brains Tell Stories So We Can Live

Feminize Your Canon: Cora Sandel

How to Consistently Write Faster

No Wasted Ink Writers Links

Happy Monday! Each week I offer up a top ten list of articles that I find interesting as an indy author. There are links to general writing tips, help with your author career path, and sometimes articles that simply tickled my fancy. I hope you enjoy reading them. Let me know your favorites in the comments.

How to Establish a Long-Term Writing Career: Insight From Two Literary Agents

How to Write While Not Writing

Building an Author Platform: What It Is, Why You Need One, and How to Get Started

WHEN CHARACTERS MEET TECHNOLOGY

Get More Done By Giving Yourself Less Time

In It to WIN It: How Committed Are You to Being a Successful Author?

Choosing Naval Tactics for Your Pre-Gunpowder World

Habitable Planets: Exoplanet Research for Worldbuilding

How To Become A Creative Writer & Figure Out What You Should Write

Writers, Remember: The Wand Chooses The Wizard

No Wasted Ink Writers Links

Welcome to No Wasted Ink’s top ten writer links. Every Monday I share writer links from my personal surfing of the internet, showcasing the ones that I found to be the most useful or interesting. I hope you enjoy them!

Hometown Book Marketing: How to be a Star Author in your Hometown

The Big Memoir Pitfall to Avoid

How Hearing Voice(s) Led to Order In a Previously Chaotic Manuscript

Using Facts As the Base of Science Fiction

COULD YOU WRITE A RANDOM FANTASY NOVEL?

How to Evoke Reader Emotions With “Surprisingness”

A Powerhouse Secret for Point of View

Pitch Perfect: Can You Sell Your Story in ONE Sentence?

Filling In Your Story’s Middle

Mythic Guide to Heroes & Villains — Destined and Wounded Heroes

No Wasted Ink Writers Links

Welcome to No Wasted Ink’s writing links. Each Monday I make a top ten list of writerly articles that I found useful during my personal surfing of the internet. Most are general writing tips, but sometimes I go a little afield in topics of interest to me. I hope you enjoy them!

Good Story Endings: Happy or Sad, or Something Else?

How to Get Out of the Writing Doldrums

How to Write a Page Turner: Master the 7 Rules of the Cliffhanger

Do I need to start my book with a prologue?

Writing About Your Life Without Ruining Your Relationships

Fly Me to the Moon: Fantasy versus Reality

How to Tell if Your Story Has Too Much Plot, Not Enough Character

Ten Ways to Support Other Authors

Evolution of a Cover: ISABELLA MOON

Deep POV: What IS It & Why Do Readers LOVE It So Much?