Tag Archives: authors

No Wasted Ink Writers Links

No Wasted Ink Writers Links


Welcome to the top ten writing links from No Wasted Ink. This time the links are mainly writing craft. Just the thing for those of you braving Nanowrimo this month. I hope you like the links!

Writers and Illustrators of the Future Contest 2020 and 2021 Winners

Teleportation in Science Fiction

6 Questions to Help You Avoid Repetitive Scenes

Alchemy of Place: How to Create Tension Through Your Story’s Setting and Atmosphere

Market Your Novel with Character Interviews

Firearms: The Writer’s Guide to “Knowing Your Weapon!”

How Useful Are Elmore Leonard’s 10 Rules of Writing?

What Are Pinch Points and Where Do They Go?

Writers: How to Tell the Future

Three Aspects of “Revision:” Reworking, Refining, and Revisioning

Author Interview: R.K. Bentley

Author RK Bentley considers himself fortunate in being able to self publish a comic book when self publishing was in it’s infancy and now self publishing a novel. Please welcome this enterprising author to No Wasted Ink.

Hello my name is R. K. Bentley and I started off reading novels and comics books in my teens, in college I self published 4 issues of a b+w comic book and several years later I discovered National Novel Writing Month. I began to write my first novel when I joined the Association of Rhode Island Authors and created a writing group called the Rhody Writing Group. It took me eight years to finish my first novel and I published it in 2018. I’m working on the sequel now.

When and why did you begin writing?

I began writing in Junior High School. My first story was the novelization of the first episode of a cartoon show known as The Transformers. My other stories were self insertion Robotech fan fiction before I knew what fan fiction was. After getting a suggestion to write in my own universe I did just that. I wrote because it was fun and enjoyable.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

It’s an interesting question because in my mind, anyone can write. I never wrote a short story before I was always geared towards manuscripts so I considered myself a writer when I co-wrote the first issue of Totems, the b+w comic book I helped self published during college.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

My current book is called Where Weavers Daire and it’s a mishmash of science fiction and fantasy. It takes place on a planet where immortals and mortals living not exactly in harmony. There are machines, mages and mortals. It’s the first in a series.

What inspired you to write this book?

What inspired me to write the book was I sitting on this universe for years and started writing in it during NaNoWrimo but never finished it. In the end, I wanted to publish a story, any story set in that verse so I decided to write prequel series sort of a Avengers Assemble / Gathering story.

Do you have a specific writing style?

Third person omniscient past tense. I try to write scenes instead of overview so getting the readers in the heads of the characters. I’ve tried first person but it’s never caught my fancy.

How did you come up with the title of this book?

It went through several title changes until I decide to spoof the movie Where Eagles Dare. The title isn’t a misprint, there’s a house of mages in the series called Daire. It’s book one of Stuk on the Hollow series, another play on words since the characters are stuck on this rogue planet called Stuk’s Hollow.

What authors have most influenced your life? What about them do you find inspiring?

Cherie Priest. Tanya Huff. Dean Koontz. James S. A. Corey. John Scalzi. I like the stories they write and their writing styles. I’ve seldom have had to lem a book from any of them.

If you had to choose, is there a writer would you consider a mentor? Why?

I would consider John Scalzi a mentor because he gives out great advice to up and coming writers. He’s very down to earth and isn’t full of himself. He never sugar coats it.

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator?

The cover was pre-made by damonza.com and once I saw it I thought it fit the book perfectly. The price was right in my budget as well. It was stroke of luck to find a company that had a cover that barely needed to be edited and fit the theme of the book so well.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

If you’re writing a short story: finish it. If you’re writing a novel: finish it. Once you finish it keep writing, get your work critiqued and edited. Expect feedback you don’t want to hear. Take notes and keep writing. Don’t throw it all away just because someone give you feedback you don’t want to unless…of course there is always the possibility your writing is shit and then, well, maybe it’s time to try something new.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

I know Weaver was a confusing here and there but I promise it will all make sense in later books…I hope. 🙂


R. K. Bentley
Providence, RI

FACEBOOK
TWITTER
GOODREADS
INSTAGRAM

Where Weavers Daire

Cover Artist:
Publisher: RKB Studios

Books2Read

No Wasted Ink Writers Links

No Wasted Ink Writers Links

Welcome to No Wasted Ink’s writer’s links. Below are the top-ten links to articles about the craft of writing, science fiction/fantasy genre, and poetry. This week I was heavy into reading abou craft, and therefore these links reflect that. I hope you enjoy them!

2021 SFPA Poetry Contest Winners

Level Up: Think Like a Teacher

Why Fantasy Should Seem Real

Disney, you must bring the Captain America musical to Avengers Campus

Like Learning to Ride A Horse

On the Kind of Fiction Called Morbid

Can Self Or Hybrid Publishing Land You On The Best-Seller List?

How Far is Too Far With a Pseudonym?

Hacking: The Secret Spice of Modern Storytelling

The Problem With Multiple Viewpoints

Nanowrimo – A Writers Workshop by Wendy Van Camp

Alphasmart Neo and Samsonite Shuttle Case

National Novel Writing Month starts on November 1st every year. People from all over the world gather in coffeehouses, libraries, and other public locations to write 50 thousand words of the rough draft of a novel in 30 days. It is a time of writing madness. You set aside the regular activities of your life and focus on getting words on the page.

Practice Makes Perfect

The first few times that I attempted Nanowrimo, I was lucky to write 10 thousand words. I did not have the habit of writing every day, and I did not write an outline for my story ahead of time. In 2010, that changed for me. For the first time, a story woke up and “spoke” to me. No, this was not the sign of mental illness. One of the common traits that authors share is a connection to their subconscious mind where their “muse” works behind the scenes to create art. For the first time in years, my writing “muse” activated. I could not refuse to write this story even if I wanted to. Something within me pushed me forward as my story grew richer.

That year, I wanted to take part in the write-ins of my area for the first time. I was at a loss of how to participate. I did not own a laptop and did not have the funds to buy one at that time. As I read the forums at nanowrimo.org, I stumbled upon a thread about a machine called an alphasmart 3000. It is a digital typewriter designed for classrooms to teach keyboarding. The alphasmart has no internet connections, a tiny screen where you could only see a few lines at a time, and a large full-sized keyboard. I could download any text that I typed into the word processor of my choice. The best part is that I could purchase a used Alphasmart for around $25 including shipping. I bought one on eBay. It allowed me to leave my desktop behind and find the freedom to write in any location that I choose.

I also discovered Chris Baty’s book, “No Plot? No Problem!: A Low-Stress, High-Velocity Guide to Writing a Novel in 30 Days“. In it, he describes his method of writing a rough draft. He believes in the adage: write quickly, edit slowly. What Baty recommends is to write with abandon. Do not erase what you write, let your mind go free and write everything that comes to you as fast as possible. Put out as much word count during each writing session as you can. Once your 30 days are up, take a deep breath and then go back and edit your words to clean up the passages, but not before. His book also offers inspiration to all new authors to develop good writing habits.

At the write-ins that year, I absorbed a great deal of information about the craft of writing. Before Nanowrimo, I thought you wrote a book and sent it in to a publisher and there it ended. Instead, I learned that the rough draft is only the start of the process. You also sel-edit your work, hire proofreaders to double check your manuscript for typos and content, and finally choose how to publish your book.

That November became a writing workshop for me. I asked an endless number of questions at the write-ins. My “instructors” were all a bunch of techie college students who were more connected to their smartphones than the surrounding people. They made me feel old before my time, but I absorbed the information and did not take their youth personally. In the end, I pushed forward and made the 50-thousand-word goal for the first time.

Why Participate in Nanowrimo?

If you are a new aspiring author, Nanowrimo will provide you with a support group of people who will cheer you on as you write your book. During Nanowrimo, discussions revolve around all the new software and tools that are available to writers. You will learn new techniques.

As the years have gone by, I have become a published author and poet. I sell short stories and poetry in magazines, following a tradition publishing path. However, my books tend to be independently published. I credit Nanowrimo with giving me my start. I have since upgraded to an Alphasmart Neo for drafting and use Scrivener as my writing program of choice to organize my novel projects.

I set aside October for planning a new long project, either a novella or a book. This includes brainstorming plot points, writing outlines and creating character sheets. During November, I clear my calendar and plan to spend at least two to three hours a day working on my rough draft, minus the Thanksgiving Day holiday. Sometimes I write with the wrimo groups, sometimes I write on my own. Nanowrimo is there to bolster me when I grow tired, to push me to keep on working. I like to use their energy. It is like coasting with full sails with a trade wind toward your goal. It makes those larger projects easier to complete.

To learn more information about Nanowrimo, visit Nanowrimo.org. There is a wealth of information about the program on the website. It is free to join and the writing information is available year round. If writing in November is not good timing for you, there are other months set aside with a similar format where you can gain a helpful push for your word count. The important thing is to write. Sit in your chair, use your writing machine of choice, and get the words flowing.

No Wasted Ink Writers Links

No Wasted Ink Writers Links

Welcome back to No Wasted Ink’s top-ten articles about writing with a science fiction and fantasy bent. This week I found many great articles for you to review. Enjoy!


Search Engine Optimization for Novelists

Multiverses in Science Fiction

Guaranteed Success Strategy!

A Checklist for In-Person Book Events

Two Important Points for Writers

The Log-Line: Can You Pitch Your ENTIRE Story in ONE Sentence?

How Can Writers Make Description Evocative?

Writing Neurodivergent Characters in Fantasy

How Much Do I Need To Describe My Character’s Appearance?

The 411 on Writing Retreats