Tag Archives: dragons

Author Interview: Hannah Steenbock

Hannah Steenbock is a German writer of Speculative Fiction. She uses both her native German and English as languages for her tales, as she loves English and tends to think in that language when plotting Fantasy. She lives and works in Kiel, the northernmost state capital of Germany. Her other pastimes include strolling along beaches, talking with trees, and devouring as many stories as time allows. I’m honored to introduce her here on No Wasted Ink.

Author Hannah SteenbockI’m Hannah Steenbock. I’m German, living in Germany, but writing in English, mostly. I’m 50+, and I wear many hats: I work part-time in a civil service job, I run a small practice as therapist and coach, and of course, I write.

When and why did you begin writing?

I wrote fan fiction as a kid. But I seriously started writing in January 2000. I know this so well because it was such an exciting experience to start writing out a scene stuck in my head and finding that I did 30 pages of work before even getting to it – and the whole thing eventually built into several novel-sized adventures of my fantasy hero and heroine. Those novels need a lot of work before I’ll publish them, but they were the beginning of my writing career.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I got my first outside validation by signing a contract with an agent in 2004, on the strength of the first novel in that fantasy series. That was when I thought I might actually be good enough. They didn’t sell a single book, and I ended the contract five years later… and then started self-publishing.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

I’m going to talk about “Dorelle’s Journey”, the first book in my Cloud Lands Saga. That’s the first series I wrote about dragons, even though I’ve been in love with dragons since I discovered Pern in the school library during my exchange year in California. It took me that long to write dragons… I was always afraid that it would be called a copy of Anne McCaffrey.

I love Dorelle because she’s an independent woman, firm in her beliefs and her love of her dragon. And she’s willing to risk her life for others. In the book, I challenge her a lot… and she came through it all with flying colors. So did her dragon.

What inspired you to write this book?

#takes a deep breath#

Originally, I started out writing a novel with three different main characters, and three different timelines. They were supposed to meet in the Cloud Lands (that’s one large area in my world) and turn from enemies to friends. I got stuck on that one… ( it’s the base for my second series that will be called The Cloud Lands Wars, though.)
Even so, my mind stayed in that world, and I found a shorter story about how the Cloud Lands actually were discovered – basically a generation or so before that ill-fated novel. And the result is “Dorelle’s Journey”.

Do you have a specific writing style?

I don’t think so, to be honest. But most of my stories are “feel-good” stories. I see so much destruction and darkness in the world around us that I don’t need to put that into my stories. It’s unlikely you’ll see anything dystopian by me.

How did you come up with the title of this book?

I thought about it. 😉 No, seriously, most of my titles are just short descriptions of what happens in the books. And in this one, Dorelle takes a heck of a journey – and back. I try to make my titles short and powerful, though.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Yes, there is. Underlying the whole struggle in the series – Dorelle’s trouble with her Wing Commander and everything else – is the big question: How do we treat our dragons? They are an intelligent species, but their abilities are not valued everywhere, beyond their flying and fighting. There is a lot of discrimination going on. In this case, it’s speciism, and not racism, but the result is very similar. There are similarities to slavery…

What authors have most influenced your life? What about them do you find inspiring?

Anne McCaffrey, for introducing me to dragons and amazing worlds. Pern was my favorite, but I read most of her books. Rosemary Sutcliff and Judith Tarr, for their writing style. Both know how to pack an emotional punch with few words. Even with simple words. I adore that ability. And I adore Judy’s Lippizans. Rita Mae Brown, when she described why she wrote “Riding Shotgun”: She was stuck in a cabin with nothing new to read, so she sat down and wrote what she wanted to read. Isn’t that powerful?

If you had to choose, is there a writer would you consider a mentor? Why?

I don’t really want a mentor for writing. I guard my own voice. I want it to be me, not a watered-down version of someone else. When I’m writing intensely, I don’t even read fiction. However, I would love to learn marketing and fan interaction from Hugh Howey. #laughs#

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator?

The cover design is by Ashley Fontainne. I used to be in an FB group with her, and when I wanted new covers for the series before publishing the last part, I realized she had been doing covers for a while. I like hers – they are dynamic and dramatic, so it was an easy choice. Working with her was very awesome and totally easy.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

Write. Stop reading writing advice. Stop taking the next writing class. Sit down and write. Write more. Publish what you write.
And learn about the trade. Learn copyright. Learn grammar, spelling, pacing – by reading lots. Soak up the language of your genre. So read and write. Very basic.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

I love you all. I’m so grateful you’re reading my books, and I love hearing from you, too. I’m an avid reader myself, I know all the joy that comes from books – and I hope I can feed that joy for you.

Dorrelle - Ebook_D2DHannah Steenbock
Kiel, Germany

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Author Interview: Stephanie Barr

Author Stephanie Barr is a storyteller with a focus on people, whatever form those “people” might be. And she loves to make you think, feel, and laugh. Please welcome this dynamic writer to No Wasted Ink.

Author Stephanie BarrStephanie Barr is a part time novelist, full-time rocket scientist, mother of three children (two still at home) and slave to many cats. I have three blogs, which are sporadically updated: Rocket Scientist, Rockets and Dragons, and The Unlikely Otaku. I like to read, though I’m currently obsessed with manga, and I love to write and tell stories. But I can also do the math.

When and why did you begin writing?

I started writing no later than thirteen because that’s when I first started saving it. I used to write poetry and throw it away—usually telling a story because I’m a natural born story teller—then I wrote one I thought my father, who generally didn’t like any fiction, might like. And he did. And he made me promise not to throw anything away ever again, so I haven’t. Been writing ever since.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Since then. Oh, I’ve grown as a writer—it has been thirty-six years—but I published my first short story I ever wrote in my first anthology and I’m not a big ashamed of it. I didn’t change it either. My first anthology (Conjuring Dreams) was really about my growth as a writer. I started out with epic poetry, then moved to short stories, then later I started writing novels. But you can see how I taught myself dialog and subtleties and such in the anthology, so I didn’t go back and change the old work. Sometimes, the old work works, too, just as it is. I still write short stories and have another anthology coming out shortly called Legacy

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

Beast Within (The Bete Book 1) starts with a cargo of refugee children (mostly teenagers) that gets diverted en route to the local moon during a war with an intergalactic aggressor. As a result, the cargo ship crash lands on an unknown planet across the universe with a thousand kids and a handful of crew and teachers. Among the thousand kids are about 40 or so kids who happen to be shapeshifters and/or have psychic powers (the Bete) who desperately want to keep their nature hidden because they will be treated like demons by some of the humans.

What inspired you to write this book?

A few things. My teenage daughter was reading fantasy YA. I’d been writing fantasy since before she was born. I was also addicted to a manga/anime she introduced me to call Fruits Basket that had shapeshifters, and I found some of their dilemmas thought provoking and some of the characters interesting. In the end, very little of that inspiration remained in the story, but it’s what sparked it. Can’t give my brain an inch.

Do you have a specific writing style?

I probably write a little chattier than many. I love humor and have to be physically restrained from using parentheses. I really like to inject the particular personality of my character into my POV writing and I have a total soft spot for sarcasm and snarky folks, including telepathic cats (which are in Beast Within, by the way). I like to focus on characters and on their interactions. I am a character driven writer. I like smart characters and usually have at least one character that’s very smart. I prefer to outsmart my bad guys. Rapists never end well in my books (and are never protagonists) and I always have cats and at least one dragon.

How did you come up with the title of this book?

The male lead (Xander) of this book is a shapeshifter who happens to change into a dragon, which is very bad ass. However, his father (who was abusive and also a dragon) used his strength as an excuse to mistreat people and told him that Xander that it was an unavoidable side effect of the dragon alter, that if he became emotional, he’d hurt the people he loved, so Xander spends a lot of time squashing his feelings, so the title reflects how he feels about himself. But, it also reflects some of the less savory aspects of humankind including prejudice and ruthlessness, so the intent was to ask the question, which one is really the beast. Hence the title.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Most of my books include the message: who you are is more important than what you are and you choose who you are. I try to drive that home on several different fronts, not only with the prejudice of some of the humans but the close-mindedness of some of the Bete.

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

The characters tend to be built from aspects of myself (taken, sometimes to extreme), but not the circumstances. They’re usually far outside my experience base and this is really not an exception.

What authors have most influenced your life? What about them do you find inspiring?

I’ve learned from a lot of authors, sometimes just as good storytellers/character writers (Heinlein, Georgette Heyer, Nora Roberts, Clavel, Michener, McCaffery, Sharon Lee & Steve Miller), to people who had particular skills I admired (Poe:poetry/emotive response, Emily Bronte: emotive response, Stephen King: emotive response/writing kids effectively, etc). There are many mangakas I’ve found inspiring for their different perspectives. And, actually, I got started writing fantasy short stories by reading a story called “Spoils of War” by Jennifer Roberson in Sword and Sorceress V edited by Marion Zimmer Bradley that got me interested and involved in fantasy. It’s still one of the best short stories I’ve ever read.

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator?

Brandon Smith. Ryn Katryn does most of my covers, but Brandon has done a few and this is one of them. I was actually just chatting with him, explaining I wanted to revamp my covers (from what I had done myself) and he built the cover in record time and it was exactly what I wanted.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

Write what you love. If you love it, you’ll always have at least one fan. Learn your craft. Always strive to be better, not to be successful (though that’s always nice) but because it has your name on it, a legacy and you want it to be good. Read everything out loud, to an audience if you can swing it. I’ve caught more errors that way than every other way combined. Everything—I mean everything—is better with humor.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

My books are an eclectic mix of different genres and characters, but they’re all fun, they’re all thought-provoking, they’re all full of excitement and adventure. And cats, often telepathic ones. And I’m not done, not by a long shot.

Beast Within Book Cover.jpgStephanie Barr
League City, TX

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Author Interview: Saoirse O’Mara

Author Saoirse O’Mara tries to follow her heart with her children’s stories. Her goal is to make her readers smile, laugh, guess, and be entertained until the end, and to think about her intriguing stories for a long time. A goal worthy of any author! Please welcome her here to No Wasted Ink.

author-photo-saoirse-omaraI’m Saoirse O’Mara, also known as Theresa Berg. I write under two different names because I write in two different languages. Books written as Theresa Berg are originally German, books written as Saoirse O’Mara are originally written in English. I live in Berlin, Germany, with my American husband and our two cats, Tüte and Kami. Our household communicates in fluent Denglish (mix of German and English) of course. When I’m not writing children’s books or mystery, I’m studying languages and linguistics, currently Sanskrit and Latin. So yeah, I’m a complete language nerd. I’m also a gamer; I love playing pen and paper RPGs like The Dark Eye and Pathfinder, but also video games like League of Legends, Titan Quest, and others.

When and why did you begin writing?

I think I started writing as soon as I was able to write coherent sentences. I just had so many stories to tell, and a very creative mind (teachers may have called me out for daydreaming). I also loved reading, and when I was still in kindergarten and was finally able to read books on my own (my parents taught me to read before I entered school), I decided that when I grew up, I wanted to be a writer too.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

This is a difficult one. I actually don’t remember, but it was probably after finishing my first manuscript. I was twelve or thirteen, and the story was a lot like Enid Blyton’s Famous Five books. This manuscript is still hidden away somewhere at home, and I even revised it a few years later, but it’s nowhere near publishable. It did show me, though, that I am able to tell a story from beginning to end and write it down.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

The book shown here, Miro the Dragon, is a children’s book about friendship and courage. In four stories, the tiny and scared dragon Miro has to learn essential dragon skills like flying, breathing fire, swimming, and hunting. He befriends a human girl who helps him believe in himself and later befriends one of his classmates at dragon school, the big dragon Botsch, who teaches him to swim. The book has fans ranging from three years old to over sixty years old, but the recommended age range is four to eight years old.

What inspired you to write this book?

I was at a medieval market in my home town and started talking to the storyteller, who complained about a lack of dragon stories for young kids, and who, after learning that I am a writer, asked me whether I could write her a story. I agreed, but after I had written Miro’s first story, she never responded to my email about licensing and payment, so I decided to instead turn it into a book. Miro told me a few more stories, which I faithfully wrote down, and once I had four stories written, I looked for an illustrator to capture him and his friends.

Do you have a specific writing style?

I actually don’t know. I rather think I have several writing styles, depending on what I write, and in which language I write. I do tend to avoid long descriptions and story “padding”, though, which is probably why my books are all rather short.

How did you come up with the title of this book?

That was actually pretty easy; Miro told me. What was more difficult was coming up with fitting titles for the individual stories. I sometimes wrote the whole story before the right title came to mind, and at other times, the title was the only thing I had and the story followed.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

It is okay to be afraid. And if you are too afraid to even try something new, maybe a friend can help you overcome your fear. Sometimes, all it takes is to finally try it.

What authors have most influenced your life? What about them do you find inspiring?

Two of my greatest influences were Enid Blyton, whose books I devoured as a child, and Agatha Christie, the queen of British mystery. I love the stories they told, and the characters they created.

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator?

The cover and illustrations for Miro were done by the amazing artist Svenja Liv, who is also a friend of mine. We met in a writer’s forum online and I simply fell in love with her style. She was able to bring Miro and his friends to life with her drawings. She also did the covers for my middle-grade mystery/fantasy series A Rogue’s Tale. A few years ago, we finally met in person.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

Don’t give up. Try out different things. Follow your heart. Listen to your characters (they’re always right, you know). But most importantly, have fun.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Thank you for all the feedback you’re giving me, either through reviews or personally. Thank you for letting me know that you (or your kids) fell in love with my characters. Thank you for spending your precious time with my books.

Miro-Cover-web (2)Saoirse O’Mara
Berlin, Germany

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Author Interview: Jon Wasik

Author Jon Wasik has been telling stories since he was a little boy, but didn’t put pen to paper until fifth grade, when he had grand dreams of becoming the next big sci-fi/fantasy writer. Since then he has written hundreds of short stories and multiple novels, many of which can be found posted on the web. Please welcome him to No Wasted Ink.

Author Jon WasikMy name is Jon Wasik, I’m an IT tech by day, a fearless writer by night! Okay perhaps not fearless, but hey, I can dream. I live in Colorado right now, a state which seems to have an identity crises when it comes to seasons, but at least it keeps it interesting! I love all things geek, including reading, video games, and sci-fi/fantasy conventions!

When and why did you begin writing?

I’ve been an avid reader for as long as I can remember, so one day when I was bored in 5th grade, I just picked up a pencil because I wanted to write my own Star Trek story. Everyone in my class read it, and most enjoyed it, so from that day forward I was hooked. I knew that I could inspire readers the same way books had inspired me all of my life.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

That first fateful day in 5th grade was definitely day one, but it wasn’t until I created a website to post my first fanfic in 1999 that I truly felt like a writer. It was then that more than just friends and family could read my stories, and it was then that I received my first feedback, both positive and negative, from complete strangers.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

At the time that I write this, The Sword of Dragons has been published for nearly a year. Forged 3000 years ago, The Sword was designed to end the civil war between the Star Dragons and their twisted kin, the Dark Dragons. Now, a rogue Mage has discovered the Sword and has used it to incite war. Only the outcast Warrior Cardin Kataar and the fledgling Wizard Dalin stand in her way. Together, they must unite the four kingdoms against her, or watch everything they know fall to darkness.

What inspired you to write this book?

The Sword of Dragons has a very, very long history. When I first started writing, I was completely obsessed with writing sci-fi, and so this novel started as a sci-fi with fantasy elements. I wanted to tell my own epic space opera like Star Wars or Star Trek (sensing a theme?) One day I realized this would work so much better as a high fantasy. So the inspiration for this story has varied sources. Sci-fi for sure, in fact, the main trio, Cardin, Sira, and Reis, I had long ago modeled after Kirk, McCoy, and Spock (though that has drastically changed since then…) Some Arthurian legends played a role too, such as the powerful sword central to the plot, but that too evolved into something very different.

Ultimately, my inspiration came from a desire to create a new universe, complete and imaginative, that readers could delve into for years to come.

Do you have a specific writing style?

My favorite novels have always been in third person limited, so I find myself always drawn to that medium. To me it is the best of both worlds: you get to focus on seeing the world from the specific character or characters you focus on, and so learn so much about them, but also the beauty of a wider picture from being able to see events from multiple perspectives. In The Sword of Dragons, I specifically keep each chapter centered around a single character’s PoV.

How did you come up with the title of this book?

Originally it was called Sword of the Dragon, simply because it was a Sword crafted by the Star Dragons. However, when I finally finished the final draft, many many years after I had started the original story, I did a search in Amazon, and found that another novel had been published with that name. At first, I was saddened, how in the world could I come up with a better title for this novel? But then a friend suggested that “The Sword of Dragons” would be a more apt description anyway, so I ran with it, and I find that it does in fact fit the history of the titular weapon better.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

There are many, but I love leaving most of those to the readers to discover on their own. However, the two that I think are most obvious are that 1: no weapon or object in existence is inherently good or evil, it all depends on who wields it; and 2: the universe runs on action, not inaction, and if you wish to make a difference, you must act.

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Being a high fantasy, most of the novel is imagination. But like any good writer, I drew as much on real life as I could. For instance, the character of Reis, always grinning and in good cheer, but able to be serious when the need arose, was based loosely on one of my closest friends. I’ve had limited experience with sword fighting, but had to adapt that knowledge to a fantasy adventure setting.

What authors have most influenced your life? What about them do you find inspiring?

Certainly Tolkein, not in writing style but in story quality and world-building. J. K. Rowling has most definitely been a huge inspiration, and her writing style is incredible! But honestly, I grew up reading a lot of the Star Wars novels, and I loved the styles of Timothy Zahn and Michael Stackpole. Their ability to tell adventure stories with just enough detail to satisfy, but not too much so as to slow down the action, has been a big influence on me.

If you had to choose, is there a writer would you consider a mentor? Why?

I’ve never had another writer take me under their wing. The only reason my writing has progressed so much over the years is because of friends who have not been shy about giving honest feedback on my writing.

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator?

Christian Michael was the artist for book 1. I chose him because I knew him in person and so could work with him in real-time, but also because I loved the work he had done for his own book covers.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

Write with passion! I cannot overstate that, your passion is your greatest strength, and believe me, readers can feel when it’s there, and when it’s not. So write what you love, and love what you write.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

You all are why I write! To inspire and bring excitement and joy to all of you. And I absolutely love hearing from you, so please never hesitate to reach out to me 🙂

Sword of Dragons Book Cover
Jon Wasik
Denver, CO

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Author Interview: Elizabeth Gaines Johnston

A huge fan of fantasy and medieval history, Author Elizabeth Gaines Johnston loves weaving complicated storylines together to create characters who feel like real people. She enjoys using words to paint a picture, so my worlds have a tangible feel to them. Please welcome this up and coming fantasy author to No Wasted Ink.

Author Elizabeth Gaines JohnstonMy name is Elizabeth Gaines Johnston, author of the Gilded Serpents trilogy, as well as the upcoming sequel series, The Realm of Possibilities trilogy. I am a single mother of two sets of identical twin boys (ages 16 and 10) as well as a busy school volunteer, where I direct and teach the theater program for 2nd-8th graders, as well as helping publish the school’s student paper. I have a BA in English Literature with an emphasis on medieval studies, and a History minor. I love to travel. I don’t get to do it as often as I’d like. I’m also a fan of Doctor Who, Firefly, Marvel, some DC (mostly Wonder Woman), The Princess Bride, and many fantasy series.

When and why did you begin writing?

I’ve always loved to write, in my pre-teen and teen years it was mostly short stories and poetry for friends. When I was first married, right out of college, we moved from California to Minnesota, and so while my husband was in med school, I took whatever jobs I could to keep us solvent. To keep my sanity, I used my lunch breaks and after hours writing what I initially thought would be another short story. However, the characters had other ideas, and soon, I found myself writing Dragon’s Gift, the first book of my first trilogy.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Good question. I suppose in college I began to think of myself as a writer, but it wasn’t until I had over 1000 pages of my trilogy written that I knew myself to be one. I finally felt like an author when I sold my first book to a total stranger, who later told me how much they enjoyed it.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

All three books are out simultaneously, so no one has to wait to find out what happens! The first book, Dragon’s Gift, is the most lighthearted, as out heroine is starting out on her journey, meeting new friends and acquiring new skills. The second book, Magic’s Price, is the longest of the three, mainly because that’s where the divisions naturally occurred. It is more complex, as several key players become separated during this time, and they find they must face challenges they never expected. Our heroine, and her friends, also grow more and more to doubt themselves during this portion of the tale. Finally, in the conclusion of the trilogy, War’s Toll, our main characters have to overcome tremendous odds and their own misgivings in order to defeat the great evil threatening their lands.

What inspired you to write this book?

I’ve always loved the fantasy genre, but the majority of the books have a main male character at their core. I wanted my story to revolve around my heroine, but also to show the strength she gets from those beside her. Not just in the sense of romance, though there are romances in my books, but also from family and allies, some of whom she never expected to find rallying to her cause. I also wanted to give young women the sense that if they believe in themselves, they have already won the most important battle.

Do you have a specific writing style?

I try to give the reader a chance to see things through the eyes of different characters. I hate to compare myself to another author since each of us has a distinct voice. I am particularly proud of the images I am able to create with my words. I like the sense of painting a picture that the reader can see.

How did you come up with the title of this book?

For each book, it was what the heroine found herself facing. In Dragon’s Gift, Kwyleeana finds herself in possession of a magical pendant given to her by Baelwyn, a dragon. This gift opens her to an entirely new world around her. In Magic’s Price, she has to come to terms with what the magic she is using costs her. She also must decide if she is willing to pay that price. In War’s Toll, the war has arrived, and all the characters, our heroine included, will be forced to face the devastation and loss that wars bring.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Empowerment. I have always felt if you believe in yourself, you are well on your way to success. The worst thing we do is defeat ourselves before we’ve begun. Also, I’m a strong believer in the concept of relying on the strength of those around you…none of us is in this world alone, and the greatest burdens become lighter if we have loyal friends beside us willing to share the load.

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

As this is a fantasy novel, not really. However, I spent many years as a member of the Society for Creative Anachronism (SCA), and several of my characters in this world are amalgams of people I knew from those years. It also helped me add a real authenticity to my dialogue and details of a medieval-esque fantasy world.

What authors have most influenced your life? What about them do you  find inspiring?

As an English lit major, I found a lot to inspire me. The strength of Isabel Allende’s women, the rich details of Marion Zimmer Bradley’s Arthurian tales, the fun and excitement of David Eddings, and the way I can lose myself in the worlds of Terry Brooks. I also find hope in the tales of Brooks and J.K. Rowling, who were in other careers and did not find success as authors until later.

If you had to choose, is there a writer would you consider a mentor? Why?

Terry Brooks. The way he incorporated what he knew into his books, and then cast aside his career as a successful lawyer to follow his dream of being a fantasy adventure author.

Who designed the painterly cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator?

Kimberly Daniel designed all three book covers. The first one she did for me as a friend, because all the covers I was being sent by my first publisher were awful, and didn’t fit my writing style at all. I then contracted her to design the other two to keep my styles consistent. I also knew she would give me what I needed for a design, and would do it on time and professionally.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

Don’t try to be anyone else. Be true to your own voice. The biggest mistake you can make is to write for what pleases other people. If you write to please yourself, that’s when you will create brilliance. And like my heroine, Princess Kwyleeana, believe in yourself, for then you have the strength to win all battles.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

All authors need readers to support them. If you like my book, please give me positive reviews on Amazon, Barnes and Noble and other websites. Ask your local bookstore to stock my books. Recommend my books to friends (or better yet, buy them copies as gifts). And never be afraid to contact me. I’d love to hear from you.

Dragons Gift Book CoverElizabeth Gaines Johnston
Los Angeles, CA

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Cover Artist: Kimberly Daniel

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