Tag Archives: fantasy

Author Interview: C. Micheal Powers

I love to discover authors that have lived lives a bit off the beat track. C. Michael Powers certainly fits that description! I am pleased to welcome him here to No Wasted Ink.

Author C. Michael PowersMy name is Christopher Powers. I write under the name C. Michael Powers. I’m a young expat living in my wife’s beautiful country of Panama. I spend most of my time traveling around this country, writing freelance, and maintaining my blog.

I was born in Tulsa, Oklahoma, but having divorced parents led me to a life on the road, moving all over the U.S. I joined the Air Force right out of high school and was sent to Elmendorf Air Force Base in Anchorage, Alaska. That’s where I met my wife (a Panamanian in Alaska, long story). I managed security for a few Tiffany & Company jewelry stores (in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida, Chicago, Illinois, and Columbus, Ohio) before the recession got the best of me. We were broke, not sure what to do with our lives, so I thought, “My wife gave my country a try. I guess I should try hers.” Now I’m here in Panama, with my wife and four kids, spending every chance I can writing my novels and roaming around the city, beaches, mountains, and rolling plains.

When and why did you begin writing?

I had no idea I wanted to write until I was 16 years old. I’d just learned to type without looking at the keyboard. I was visiting my grandfather in Grove, Oklahoma, and while my dad and little brother were out fishing on the lake, I stayed behind to watch TV. I just happened to stumble upon an old typewriter that was covered up in a bedroom corner. I yanked the cover off, sat down, and started punching on the keys. I wrote several chapters that afternoon.

When I went back to school, I started handwriting the book. I remember my friend, Angela Garsetti, read the first notebook. She hunted me down and demanded that I hurry up and finish the next one. If it weren’t for Angela, I may not be writing today. She kept me moving forward. Looking back, that first book was ridiculous. It was basically everything I wanted to be. It was all about a teenager in a small town in Oklahoma. All the girls were in love with him. All the guys wanted to fight him. Everyone had some sort of crazy secret. Ha, it really was ridiculous.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I’m just starting to now. All throughout my stint in the military, I kept handwriting everything in notebooks. Finally, when I got out of the Air Force, I bought my first laptop, and paid about $300 for Movie Magic Screenwriter. I knew I wanted to write screenplays. I’m a huge movie buff and loved creating characters for the big screen. The problem was, none of my characters were anywhere close to hitting that big screen.

I’d written the Mirror Images story out in screenplay format first. I think it came out to about 140 pages or something like that. I had to scale back, chop up the story, and throw out characters, just to get it down to the 120 page maximum (screenplays shouldn’t be longer than 120 pages). Even then I got complaints that it was too long and that there was just too much relentless action going on in those 120 pages. People seemed to like the story. I got great reviews. However, it seemed to exhaust readers with so much crammed into that little 120 page package. So I started writing it out in novel form instead.

When I moved to Panama, I still didn’t consider myself a writer. I kept working on churning out the first Mirror’s novel. I worked a few dead end jobs here in Panama before finding an Editorial Assistant job for a respected online publisher, one that deals mostly with living and investing overseas. With that job I started writing a monthly e-zine about living here in Panama. I’d probably been doing that about six months before I started to consider myself a writer. I still work for that company, but now I only write the monthly e-zine. Being an Editorial Assistant wasn’t for me. I just want to write.

Shortly after leaving the full-time gig, I published my book with Amazon’s KDP program. Then I created my blog. My wonderful wife, Marlene, has considered me a writer for a long time. When we first moved to Panama, and we were filling out the immigration forms, under employment, she would always tell me to put down “writer.” It just didn’t feel right to me. Now, I can finally say that I’m a writer…and I love it.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

Sure. If you don’t mind, I’d just like to use the summary from the back of the book.

When an average Joe’s reflection in the mirror switches places with him, he finds himself trapped in a strange mirror world, battling his way back to the other side so that he can stop his reflection from destroying the life he knows.

“Have you ever wondered why so many people in prison claim to be innocent? It’s ‘cause most of ‘em are,” Dozier whispered.

On the other side of the mirror, lies a horrific world where each of us has an image, our violent replica, capable of fulfilling our darkest desires, and only released into our world when we’re unable to follow through with an evil deed. Gabe Cutter, an average paper pusher, has his life ripped out from under him when his image switches places with him, hell bent on destroying the life Gabe knows, and killing his cheating fiance’. Now, stuck on the other side of the mirror, Gabe must join together with a band of stranded survivors and find a way to get back to his world before his image destroys it. Along the way he battles his way through maniacs, monsters, and ultimately his own heart, as he realizes that the woman he’s been trying to save…wasn’t worth the price of admission.

What inspired you to write this book?

I think it all came about from my desire to write something that I’d want to read. I’m not a big fan of sci-fi, at least not the space ship kind of science fiction. And fantasy always seems to conjure up visions of Lord of the Rings. Then you’ve got the vampire and werewolf books flying off the shelves right now. All of those styles and story lines are great, and I may even write something in those genres myself one day, but it’s not what I wanted to read. I wanted something more raw and gritty.

I wanted to write something that takes place now, but has elements of dark fantasy, monsters, maniacs, and just an insane version of our reality. I wanted to let loose, send the virtual ink flying, and see what my mind was capable of. That’s how Mirror Images came to be.

Do you have a specific writing style?

I try to be a very visual storyteller. If I could draw, I probably would’ve written the Mirror Images story out in graphic novel form. I think my writing is like that, sort of like a graphic novel, but I give you the details necessary to imagine the pictures yourself. I’ve placed the series in the Urban Fantasy genre because it seems to be where it makes most sense. However, when I describe the book, I like to say it’s a Kick Ass Urban Fantasy. I try to keep the action going and keep the reader moving forward. Hopefully I’ve accomplished this with the first book.

How did you come up with the title of this book?

The title drove me nuts. I was sure the main title would be Mirror Images, because the reflections living on the other side of the mirror were referred to as Images throughout the novel. It wasn’t until I wrote the second, third, and most of the fourth book out in screenplay format that I came up with the titles of all the books. Mirror Images Book 1: The Darkness of Man was perfect. The first book is about that, the darkness of man, both the images and humans. The images have a dark desire to carry out what is necessary of them, and it’s man’s darkness that leads to the images switching places and coming into our world.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Once you’ve read all four books you might see a clear message. For now, I just want readers to hold on to their seats, have a blast, let their minds go nuts, and give me the chance to entertain them.

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

No, thank God. I’d be crazy if I said yes…and I’m not crazy…right?

What authors have most influenced your life? What about them do you find inspiring?

Three writers come to mind. First, S.E. Hinton. I’m from Oklahoma, and when I discovered The Outsiders, Rumblefish, Tex, and her other books, I was in heaven. I was never much of a fighter, and it thrilled me to read about teenage boys who weren’t afraid to throw down at the drop of a hat. I don’t know if I’d want my daughters to read her books, but I’ll make sure they’re on my sons’ bookshelf. My two favorite authors right now are Stephen Hunter and George R. R. Martin. Stephen Hunter writes the greatest hardcore, redneck revenge novels. The Swagger books are awesome. George R. R. Martin is the best at character development. If I can write characters even half as interesting as his, than I’ve done a good job. He makes you love even the characters you hate. That’s special.

If you had to choose, is there a writer would you consider a mentor? Why?

No writer has been a mentor, but the huge pool of struggling indie writers on Twitter and Facebook is such an invaluable group of people to know. It amazes me some of the info that is shared. If we keep helping each other out, there’s no limit to what we can accomplish.

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator?

My youngest brother, Kody Whitall, designed my book cover. He’s been going to school for that type of thing, so I reached out to him and asked if he’d like to give it a try. His first cover was great, but not really what was needed for this book. He went back to the drawing board and came up with this awesome cover. I love it. And that’s his photo on the cover too.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

Too many of us let writer’s block slow us down. If you can’t think of anything to write, put that story aside and start on one of your other ideas. Or just let your fingers go nuts. Type the craziest shit that comes to mind. That’s how some of the best stories come about.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Thanks so much for your support. I really do appreciate it. Mirror Images Book 2: Sons of Man is on its way. My problem isn’t writer’s block, but having too many ideas rolling around in my head. So you can expect lots and lots of stories to come.

Mirror Images Book CoverC. Michael Powers, Panama City, Panama.

C. Michael Powers writes kick ass urban fantasy and horror novels. When he’s not busy penning his next novel, he travels all over his wife’s beautiful country of Panama, and reports back to the readers of his blog.

Mirror Images Book 1: The Darkness of Man, published by Christopher Powers at Amazon KDP, Smashwords, and CreateSpace.

Cover Artist: Kody Whitall

Is available for $2.99 in e-book form at Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B007V9GQ7Y/ref=tsm_1_fb_lk

and at Smashwords: https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/213306

And in print for $11.99 at Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Mirror-Images-Book-Darkness-Volume/dp/1478183667/ref=sr_1_cc_1?s=aps&ie=UTF8&qid=1352226633&sr=1-1-catcorr&keywords=mirror+images+book+1+the+darkness+of+man

and at CreateSpace: https://www.createspace.com/3927570

Author Interview: Chico Kidd

I’d like to extend a warm welcome to Chico for consenting to be interviewed here on No Wasted Ink. As you can see, Chico has quite a catalog of titles to her name with many more to come on the horizon. I hope you enjoy her interview as much as I did.

Author Chico KiddI am Chico Kidd, author and artist, whose ghost and dark fantasy tales have been published in the UK, the US, Canada, Australia and Europe. Over the last few years I’ve been busy with a sequence of novels and stories featuring Luís da Silva, ship’s captain and reluctant demon-hunter. Demon Weather, the first novel in the series, has recently been published by Booktrope; the Portuguese-language rights have been bought by Lisbon-based Saída de Emergência. The next three novels, The Werewolf of Lisbon, Resurrection, and Sinned Against, are complete; a fifth is in progress. The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror 13 and Dark Terrors 6 featured three short stories between them. Others have appeared in Supernatural Tales, Acquainted with the Night, Poe’s Progeny, and elsewhere.

My first novel, The Printer’s Devil, came out in 1996 from Baen and was reprinted last year by Booktrope. It’s a tale in the classic English Ghost Story tradition of M.R. James, as were most of the stories in my first hardback anthology Summoning Knells (2000). I also write in collaboration with Australian author Rick Kennett, and our collection of Carnacki the Ghost-Finder stories No. 472 Cheyne Walk was published in 2002 (both Ash-Tree Press).

When and why did you begin writing?

I have been writing for as long as I can remember— by age 10 I was telling people that I wanted to be a writer when I grew up. Luckily everything I wrote prior to 1979 has vanished into the mists of time. Why, is also easy. I loved reading. I devoured books like a starving book-eating creature. I wanted more books like the ones I loved to read, and spent hours thinking up titles and storylines and designing the covers for them. The earliest thing I recall writing was one set in Narnia, and I also worked my apprenticeship by writing stories in imitation of authors as diverse as Dick Francis, P.G. Wodehouse and Tolkien. There are now many, many more influences on my writing!

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Since 1979, when my first published story, An Incident in the City, appeared in the first issue of Rosemary Pardoe’s long-running Ghosts & Scholars series. I’ve had writing jobs ever since I graduated, from greeting-card verses to advertising, but don’t really think that counts. For quite a long time, I wrote only ghost stories, mostly in the tradition of M.R. James. They found modest homes in anthologies and in small press, to which I contributed seven collections of my own: Change & Decay, In & Out Of The Belfry, Bell Music, Bells Rung Backwards, Wraiths & Ringers, and Ghosts, Scholars, Campanologists & Others. Nearly all these stories went into Summoning Knells. And then I got writer’s block, which was completely horrible. And it was cured by Captain da Silva, who barged into a story from heaven knows where and took over my writing life.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

Although Demon Weather is the first novel to feature the intrepid Captain, chronologically it is the 14th of the Da Silva Tales. The preceding stories do not need to be read to make sense of the novel! (Although I think readers might find it fun to find out more about some of the characters’ backstories.)
Luís da Silva is the captain of a barque, the Isabella, in the days when sail is in its long decline and steamships have more or less taken over the seas. He is rather more well acquainted with the night than he wants to be, but the powers that be have different ideas. (These are not the sort of powers that be that make prophecies and steer people towards destinies, but rather the kind that say to themselves “This fellow would be good at doing certain kinds of stuff, so let’s give him a nudge in the right direction,” or even just “Let’s give him some abilities that will make his life suck”.) As Riley Finn once said to Buffy, “It turns out I suddenly find myself needing to know the plural of apocalypse.” And he also has a rather shady past, which in this case comes back to bite him in the shape of a not-at-all-nice sorcerer out for revenge.

Luckily the Captain has allies in the form of a Scooby Gang which includes a werewolf, a man who can fiddle with time, an English antiquarian, a bad-tempered witch and an almost-corporeal ghost, not to mention his very resourceful wife, Emilia, and a young son and daughter who are sometimes more hindrance than help.

What inspired you to write this book?

Well, as I mentioned, I’d had a bad case of writer’s block, but once the dam broke I found myself writing like crazy. I was averaging around 10,000 words a week for a while. And so I zipped though a ton of stories that were like episodes from a series, before coming face to face with an idea that was a lot more complicated and needed the length of a novel to do it justice. I wrote the thing in three months!

Inspiration covers a lot more than that, however. I am inspired by boats and the sea, by the way Joss Whedon blends horror and comedy, by inventing characters and exploring milieus, by the city of Lisbon, by folklore and legend and the sheer fun of writing.

Do you have a specific writing style?

I do, and Rick Kennett has dubbed it “Weird Noir”. It’s Chandleresque, basically, when the Captain is doing the narration. I use a mixture of tenses in the first-person bits, because it’s a mixture of his memories, his thoughts, his actions, and it all makes it more immediate: he’s telling you the story, but it’s happening now in his mind. But I also tell the story from multiple points of view, and try to get personality across by variations in style. I sometimes make use of a version of José Saramago’s style (not many full stops, bit stream-of-consciousness-y). Harris the werewolf’s thoughts are a big part of his personality. There are a few bits of omniscient-narrator stuff where I need to describe something outside of everyone’s experience. It’s all kind of a mixture, I think it’s quite cinematic, with jump-cuts and voice-overs and zooming out and in.

How did you come up with the title of this book?

That’s kind of interesting. I’m usually good with titles, and they often come before I write the story— sometimes a title actually triggers the story. But it wasn’t till about halfway through Demon Weather that I settled on that title. It was called Hunting Souls up to then.

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Whoa, no! I don’t believe in ghosts. I don’t count demon-slayers, werewolves or even ship’s captains among my acquaintances. Much of the Captain comes from me, I guess, in terms of philosophy at least. But I don’t agree with that old truism “Write about what you know”. If everyone did that, there would be no fantasy or SF at all!

What authors have most influenced your life?

My life? No. My style, most certainly. But I love certain authors without wanting to use anything of theirs: Terry Pratchett, for instance, Ursula Le Guin, Elizabeth Moon, John Connolly. I suppose I have to say that Joss Whedon is the single most obvious influence on the DaSilvaverse, with my diverse gang of supernatural-evil battlers and the mix of action, horror, humor and characters you care about (I hope!) But I am a magpie, I pick up shiny things from all over the place, books, movies, TV, tradition, history, art, my own travels…

If you had to choose, is there a writer would you consider a mentor?

No, I can’t say that there is. I am terrible at following examples, instructions or rules, I don’t idolize any writers, although I do admire a good many. My real-life heroes are people like Aung San Suu Kyi and the late war correspondent Marie Colvin.

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator?

*coughs modestly* I did it myself. One of the first things I do when I have a character who I know will be with me for a while is draw their face. It’s a shortcut to getting inside their skin, until I get used to them.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

Write what you enjoy. Get inside the skins of your characters. Never stop writing, and don’t be afraid to run with the story.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Welcome to my world— I hope you enjoy the ride!

Demon Weather Book CoverChico Kidd
London, England

Chico Kidd’s ghost stories have been published in the US, the UK, Canada, Australia and continental Europe. Chico was born in Nottingham, England, and now lives, writes and paints near London.

Demon Weather is published by Booktrope.

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Book Review: The Dragon and the George

Book Name: The Dragon and the George
Author: Gordon R. Dickson
First Published: 1976
Winner of the British Fantasy Award

Gordon R. Dickson was born in Edmonton, Alberta. After the death of his father, he immigrated to the United States to live with his mother in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Later he served in the US Army and received a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Minnesota. Dickson has said of his work, “All my books are laboratory pieces. I’m trying something new in each one. They all have the same roots as the morality tale, but what I’m really tying into is something deeper. It’s this human urge to reach out for something better and bigger that is driving us all the time as a race.”

A regular on the science fiction convention circuit, he was known for chatting for hours with his fans or playing his guitar to entertain. Although he suffered from asthma all his life, an illness that eventually killed him, Dickson published two to three novels a year for five decades for a total of over 80 novels and 100 short stories.

Dickson is most famous for his Childe Cycle series and the Dragon Knight series, although the Hoka series he penned with Poul Anderson is certainly a well known favorite. Joel Rosenberg said of him, “He’s just one of those people who have had an impact on everybody in the field. He got his start in ’50s and has been a major force ever since.” Dickson was a past president of the Science Fiction Writers of America and had won three Hugo awards and one Nebula award before his passing at age 77 in the year 2001.

The Dragon and the George begins with 20th century academic Jim Eckert traveling to an alternate world via astral projection where magic is real, people live in feudal style and dragons not only can talk, but refer to humans as “georges” after the famous St. George the dragonslayer. Something goes awry and Jim finds himself trapped in the body of a young dragon named Gorbash. Not only does Jim have to deal with living life as a dragon, but he is also on a quest to rescue his fiancee Angie who is being held hostage by the Dark Powers of the world.

Jim is mentored by the wizard Silvanus Carolinus in magic and is aided on his quest by humans such as Dafydd Ap Hywel the welsh longbowman, Sir Brian Neville-Smythe a Knight Errant and the dire wolf Aragh who can speak and is quite abrasive. Several dragons come to his aid in the final battle, believing he is their friend Gorbash, such as the mere-dragon Secoh and Gorbash’s grand-uncle Smrgol.

In the end, Sir James Eckert has to make a final decision. Does he remain in this alternate world of magic or return to our world and live the life of an underpaid junior academic?

The Dragon and the George was one of those novels that has simply stuck with me down through the years. I first read it back as a kid when it was newly published in 1976. I fell in love with the story and it became one of my favorite books. It was the first novel I had read of Gordon R. Dickson’s, but it certainly was not the last. I did not read many of the follow ups because during the 1990s when they were written, I was busy in college and didn’t realize that they had been published, but they are all on my must read list. What I like about Dickson’s work is the humorous characters and situations he puts into his novels, but also the underlying since of personal responsibility that all his protagonists seem to have. Some may consider his work “dated”, but the wry humor and comic situations still stand the test of time. His work is a great example of classic science fiction romance.

    You can find The Dragon and the George online at most major booksellers.

    The Dragon and the George was made into an animated movie called “Flight of Dragons” (1982).




The Dragon and the George Book CoverThe Dragon and the George (1976, Nelson Doubleday) British Fantasy Award
The Dragon Knight (1990, Tor Books)
The Dragon on the Border (1992, Berkley Pub Group)
The Dragon at War (1992, Ace Hardcover)
The Dragon, the Earl, and the Troll (1994, Ace Books)
The Dragon and the Djinn (1995, Ace Hardcover)
The Dragon and the Gnarly King (1997, Tor Books)
The Dragon in Lyonesse (1998, Tor Books)
The Dragon and the Fair Maid of Kent (2000, Tor Books)

Author Interview: Tracy Angelina Evans

I met Tracy via a writing group on facebook where we discussion the little details of marketing our books and the joys and frustrations of being an author. I’m happy to add a fellow science fiction writer to the list of authors being interviewed here on No Wasted Ink. I hope you’ll enjoy her interview as much as I have.

Author Tracy Angelina EvansMy name is Tracy Angelina Evans. I use the full name because many know me as Tracy, but some know me as Angelina. It’s a long, convoluted story. Besides writing, my greatest love is music and, to me, the two are really inextricably linked. My main character Cadmus Pariah, for example, was spontaneously born out of a song called ‘Deeply Lined Up’ by a band called Shriekback. Ever since I can remember, I’ve been one to have “causes.” If I am fond of something, I will do my best to persuade any and all that they should, too. My family have long contended that I should have been an Evangelical preacher because of this trait.

When and why did you begin writing?

I began writing during my first grade in school, mainly to cope with loneliness and with the bullying I endured beginning then. It was an escape into a better world for me.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

In the early 80s, when I transitioned from writing animal-based stories, to stories revolving around human beings. My fascination was with science fiction and fantasy, and that is what I began to focus on myself.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

The third book, of the trilogy known as ‘The Vampire Relics,’ focuses on the third and last relic to be found and utilized in an attempt to redeem those Vampires who want to return to mortality and earn a place in what many would call Heaven. That book is finished and is being edited as we speak.

The book I’m writing now, deals with the remaining Vampires on Earth, including Cadmus Pariah, who has now been raised in power to the title of Plenipotentiary of the New Hive. It centers on his struggle to recapture the emotions abused out of him for decades, and what he does to each individual who brings out said emotion. The working title for the book is called The Harming Tree, which is an actual musical instrument created by Barry Andrews, who gave me permission to use the name.

What inspired you to write this book?

I have always had a love affair with Vampires, and began to properly study their lore in the late 80s. It fascinates me that so many different cultures hold the same myths and legends about a supposedly mythical creature. My aim was to bring that together and kind of explain their genesis by way of much older teachers, often called the Elfs or Elves. The development of Cadmus Pariah and why he does what he does was a major motivator for me as well.

Do you have a specific writing style?

A friend of mine quipped that I was a Method Writer, because I delve into each character as I write them. Sometimes that can be extremely painful, considering the fates of Cadmus and Faust the Confessor. Some would call it Purple Prose, but I prefer Poetic Prose. The noun-verb-noun style that Hemingway inspired, has always left me wanting. Russell Hoban outshines many modern writers because of his love of the word. His passing was a loss to us all.

How did you come up with the title of this book?

Each book is the name of one of the three relics; thus, the Chalice, the Blood Crown, and the Augury of Gideon.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

That there is a world unseen that roils around us, that is much older than we are, and is responsible for who we are today.

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

I tend to anchor some characters to real life people. I don’t know of any writer who doesn’t, but I know plenty who deny they do. Cadmus, for instance, if very heavily anchored to Barry Andrews. He know this, of course, and I think he’s a bit perplexed to have such a vicious entity be his “demon child.” They’re nothing alike really, so please don’t judge Barry by the dastardly deeds of Cadmus Pariah.

What authors have most influenced your life?

JRR Tolkien, Clive Barker, and Russell Hoban (schizophrenia anyone?)

If you had to choose, is there a writer would you consider a mentor?

I would give my left eye to be mentored by Clive Barker. He isn’t a mere writer, but a world creator. He paints his realms, then writes about them. I find that fascinating and I admit that I do covet his abilities.

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator?

Stacey Lucas drew the cover of ‘The Chalice’ simply because she was the absolute best at committing Cadmus to paper. For the ‘Blood Crown.,’ I wanted a bigger scope and to offer the reader a hint of both Cadmus and Orphaeus. Amanda Cook, an artist in Los Angeles, was responsible for that cover. She will also being doing the cover for ‘The Augury of Gideon.’

Do you have any advice for other writers?

Write what brings you the most joy, even if that joy inspires a level of discomfort. Listen to your characters; they have a lot more to say than you give them credit for. They will often write it for you, if you only give them the chance.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Despite some of more extreme scenes in the books, I hope the overall essence of ‘The Vampire Relics’ gives you Good Dreams.

The Chalice Book CoverTracy Angelina Evans
Duncan, South Carolina

I try to interpret the myth that has intrinsically created our society, a myth that never died, we just choose to no longer see it or acknowledge it.

Publisher: Fey Publishing
Illustrators:
Stacey Lucas and Amanda Cook

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Author Interview: Shidorr Myirck-Gayer

One of the pleasures of the author interview series on No Wasted Ink is the chance to meet and learn about new authors and what motivated them to begin writing. I hope you’ll find Shidorr’s story as interesting as I did.

Author Shidorr Myirck-GayerHello, my name is Shidorr Myirck-Gayer. I currently live in the North Suburbs of the Chicago land area. I grew up in Chicago with the
dream of becoming an actress. I performed in a few plays and was an extra in a few movies, one such as Spiderman 2. It was an amazing experience. Sadly I never made it any further; life got in the way… I guess. In the middle of pursuing my dream as an actress, I wrote poetry and stories. At the time, I didn’t realize that writing is where my true journey rests. I have always been interested in the world of creating tales. Pulling people in my fictional fantasies.

When and why did you begin writing?

The tragedy that consumed me ultimately pushed me into the society of published authors. Depression made me write my first novel. Her Name
is Grace
. In 2010 I had lost another child in the early months of my pregnancy. Writing was my way of dealing with my sadness.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I first considered myself as a writer, when I became published. I didn’t think the work I created counted until now.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

I must say, I had to laugh a little bit at this question. Every time someone asks me what my book is about. I can never shorten it enough,
for a quick answer. Okay, here goes…

My story is about a young girl named Grace, who grows up on a planet that’s inhabited by angels. Her and her best friend, Max, is being
trained to one day become angels themselves. The angels on the planet Mahlai hope that increasing their numbers can end the slavery war on
Earth. They also have to defend their planet against the dark angels who seek to kidnap the trainees and destroy the world of men. In this
tale Grace and Max finds discovers a powerful tool that the angels use to watch over the humans. This tool changes Grace and Max
personalities. Grace falls in love with a human and Max takes a turn for the worst.

What inspired you to write this book?

My husband’s support helped me achieve my goal of finishing the first book, of a 3 book series.

Do you have a specific writing style?

I don’t really have a writing style. I can confirm that no matter how hard I try. I can’t write the book in order. I always start on a mid
chapter first.

How did you come up with the title of this book?

I just love the name, Grace. I had a cat named that once.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

There is no message; I just want my readers to live in a world unlike their own.

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

I must say, I create my characters based on people that I know and books that I have read. For example, I have quotes from the bible and
my angels are lightly based on angels of the bible. Author Kristin Cashore depicts strong female characters in her novels and I love
that. The backdrop of my stories comes from my travels and my daydreams.

What authors have most influenced your life?

My favorite Authors are, Kristin Cashore, Suzanne Collins and John of the bible.

If you had to choose, is there a writer would you consider a mentor?

If I had to choose a mentor, it would be Kristin Cashore. Meeting her
in person confirms that.

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator?

My cover designer is John Konecny. He is an amazing artist, easy to work with and he understands what you want.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

The advice that I would give is the advice that is said over and over
again to writers, KEEP WRITING! This really does help you when you
think your work is not good enough. When you get writers block and
especially when you began to doubt yourself.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

To all my readers, Thank You for your support and I’ll try my best to
make the next book an even better adventure!

Her Name is Grace - book coverShidoor Myinck-Gayer
Her Name is Grace

Book Cover by John Konecny.