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Author Interview: Karen Michelle Nutt

No matter the genre her tales fall under, Author Karen Michelle Nutt tries to capture the rich array of emotions that accompany the most mysterious and fabulous human phenomena of falling in love. I’m pleased to welcome her on No Wasted Ink.

author karen michelle nuttMy name is Karen Michelle Nutt. As a multi-published author, I spin tales for The Wild Rose Press, Highland Press, Victory Tales Press, and Publishing by Rebecca J. Vickery. I have also ventured into self-publishing.

I reside in California with my husband. We’ve been married for thirty-two years and have three fascinating children, who are grown now and have started their own adventures in life. We still have a houseful of demanding pets. Jack, my Chorkie, is my writing buddy and sits long hours with me at the computer.

When I’m not time traveling, fighting outlaws or otherworldly creatures, I create pre-made book covers with my daughter Katrina Gillian at: Gillian’s Book Covers, “Judge Your Book By Its Cover”.

When and why did you begin writing?

I started writing down my stories when I was about nine or ten because I thought it was fun. I wrote plays at first. My fifth-grade teacher let my friends and I perform one of them too. It was very exciting for a ten-year-old.

Later, I jotted down stories in notebooks. I still have those early writings. They were written in ink, not on a computer. So ‘spell check’ wasn’t available. I couldn’t erase or add words if they were needed. Definitely, a rough draft. My daughters, when they were young, loved those stories and read them over and over again.

However, after I was married and had three children, life seemed to be too busy to pick up a pen and write. It wasn’t until a good friend of mine asked me why I didn’t write anymore that I realized how long it had been. That week I sat down and started my first novel and haven’t stopped writing since.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I suppose I’ve always been a writer in my heart, but when I held my first book in print that my publisher had sent me, I truly believed it.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

Evie Reid on a whim agrees to travel back in time to 1997 to change bad boy/rock star Bellamy Lovel’s path. She’s smart with a college degree, but she is still fan-girl crazy for the rock band, Civilized Heathens. Evie knows despite all Bellamy’s smiles and enthusiasm on the stage, he’s destined to end it all on one lonely night in a hotel room unless she can change his path.

Bellamy isn’t keen on having Evie as his personal assistant, hired by his bandmates to watch over him, and keep him on schedule. However, there is something about the woman that sparks his interest, despite his best to ignore her. When darkness threatens to consume him he realizes she may be the only light that will chase the shadows away.

What inspired you to write this book?

My daughter and I watched ‘INXS, Live at Wembley’ on DVD. We were sad to think the lead singer had died so tragically and there would never be another song written or performed by him. The time travel tale about Bellamy Lovel took root, but I wanted a happier ending for my rock star and sent Evie back in time to try and save him.

Do you have a specific writing style?

No matter how dark the story may be, I try to also keep some levity in the tale. Life is about ups and downs and everything in between. I strive to keep the characters real no matter if their human, a vampire or shapeshifter. I want them to have genuine emotions and flaws because no one is perfect. I want them to fall in love and by the end of the story, I want the characters to find their happily ever after even if its only for now.

How did you come up with the title of this book?

It was inspired by an INXS song. It wasn’t the title or the theme but three words within the song that inspired the title. Two Worlds Collided became the title for two reasons. My heroine is from the future and my hero is from the past, but their worlds collide. Also, my heroine’s essence is what travels back in time to merge with her younger self in 1997. In a sense, her worlds collide so she can be with the hero and hopefully change his tragic past.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

First and foremost, I hope the story is heartwarming, fun and simply entertaining.

Though Two Worlds Collided is a time travel romance with plenty of humor and steamy romantic moments, my fictional character, Bellamy struggles with addiction, depression, and suicide. They are all serious emotions that should never be overlooked.

Of course, thoughts of suicide are not necessarily something people announce to the world and this means loved ones often have no idea that their friend or family member is even contemplating such an act. However, there may be signs and risk factors, and while you might think you can’t make a difference by yourself, you’re wrong. Sometimes all it takes is one person to say something or do something that will change their decision. One smile, one comment, a conversation or even a gesture toward someone who is considering suicide could make all the difference in the world. It could instill hope and with hope they may seek help.

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know or events in your own life?

Though I’ve known people who have suffered from addiction and depression, Two Worlds Collided was inspired by the tragic story of a true-life rock star.

If you had to choose, is there a writer you would consider a mentor? Why?

Not really a mentor, but I do have someone I can bounce ideas off and discuss story plots. This is my daughter Katrina, who is not only a talented cover book artist but also an author as well. We’ll sit down and brainstorm about where I should send my characters next.

I also have a very good friend who edits my work and she’s not shy about telling me if something isn’t working for her in the story. This is vital in penning a good tale. I value her honest opinions. Thanks, Cathy.

What authors have most influenced your life? What about them do you find inspiring?

I’m blessed with knowing many author friends that I’ve met online who have shared their experiences on what works and what doesn’t work in the storytelling world. Both are important in striving to be a successful writer.

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator?

Gillian’s Book Covers, “Judge Your Book By Its Cover” is the name of my book cover store that I co-own with my daughter, Katrina Gillian. I created the cover for Two Worlds Collided. There were a few covers created before the one you see now was finally chosen.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

Be true to yourself. Write every day even if you don’t feel inspired. Sometimes your quick thoughts can blossom into something more.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Readers are what writers can never live without. The novel doesn’t only belong to the writer; it also belongs to the reader as well. Without the reader, the story is just ink on a paper and nothing more. Opening the book, reading those first words, this is where the true magic begins. I love readers! Thank you so much for loving books.

book cover two worlds collidedKaren Michelle NuttKaren Michelle Nutt
Huntington Beach, CA

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Two Worlds Collided

Cover Artist: Gillian’s Book Covers
Publisher: Twin Star Books

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Author Interview: Laurel Anne Hill

Author Laurel Anne Hill is an award-winning author of science fiction, fantasy, steampunk and horror. Many of her stories inspire readers to choose the way of worthiness.  Laurel is a fellow Broad Universe member and costumer with whom I’ve shared many a rapid fire reading with.  Please welcome her to No Wasted Ink.

Laurel Anne Hill for EWL Back CoverHello, I’m Laurel Anne Hill, author and former underground storage tank operator. Really! My day job for many years included environmental health and safety at a pharmaceutical research and development facility. I grew up in San Francisco with more dreams of adventure than good sense or money. My close brushes with death, love of family, respect for honor and belief in a higher power continue to influence my writing and my life. I’m blessed to have a loving husband and four wonderful children.

When and why did you begin writing?

I started writing before I could read. Stories created themselves within me I’d tell them to my older sister and she’d write them down. I’d illustrate my tales with pictures from comic books and magazines. My sister loved to write her own stories, too. I admired her and still do.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

When I was very young, I don’t think I understood the concept of being a writer. At some point in elementary school, I knew writing was what I wanted to do. I had a story published in the children’s section of a major San Francisco newspaper when I was eleven years old. Then I knew I’d become a real writer. The story, “Nancy Saves the Day,” was horrid, or course. Heck, I didn’t know the conventions for creating quality prose. I still read the piece every once in a while, to laugh and remind myself of how far I’ve progressed.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

A Life-Saving Mission

A mystical vision of an airship appears to fifteen-year-old Juanita in 1894. The long-dead captain commands her to prevent California’s thrown-away people—including young children—from boarding trains to an asylum. That institution’s director plots murder to reduce the inmate population.

Spirits watch over Juanita. But who is she? A mystic in love who holds life sacred? Or a ghost-possessed railroad-saboteur?

To save innocent lives Juanita must take lives of the corrupt. How can she reconcile her assignment with her belief in the sacredness of all human life? And will she survive to marry her betrothed?

Juanita sets out despite inner trepidation to sabotage the railroad. Her ancestor, Billy, guides her. Then bit by bit, she discovers the gut-wrenching truths all of her dead family neglected to reveal.

Ghosts, Goggles, Guns and Grit

Come visit Juanita’s world—an alternate nineteenth-century California—where spirits meet steampunk, where both love and anger emanate from beyond the grave.
What inspired you to write this book?

In the early 1990s, I had a dream about an elderly woman riding a train. The train headed toward a disreputable asylum where inmates died of neglect or even by euthanasia. The attendant placed an abandoned baby in a basket on the adjacent seat. The woman realized the baby was her great-granddaughter and escaped the train. With a broken foot, she carried the infant many miles. This dream became the basis of a short story, never published.

Where had the dream come from?

First of all, when I was a teen in the 1950s, my beloved maternal Swedish grandmother had paid the hospital bill for the birth of one of my sister’s sons. The bill had cost Grandma much of what she’d possessed. Grandma had died in 1989. In the early 1990s, my memories of her remained close.

Next, a month before I birthed my daughter in 1979, I’d fallen and broken my foot as I left work in San Francisco. My husband, David, had expected to meet me on the other side of the bay. Cell phones as we now know them didn’t exist. I hadn’t wanted to worry David by not showing up when expected. I’d walked on a broken foot, taken public transportation and traveled thirty miles to reach the train station near our home.

Third, and quite important, before I’d married David, I’d worked for him in a hospital laboratory. The hospital performed lots of abortions, including many late term. I’d believed in the right to choose, and still do. Yet stacks of plastic specimen containers containing pickled babies left a sour taste in my mouth. After all, I’d hoped to birth a child of my own someday.

That fateful night of dreaming, my pro-choice beliefs had gone head-to-head with a pro-life type visualization. In the story that emerged, a woman who’d married into a Mexican family declared her own opinions. I had no choice but to accept her challenge to tell the tale of the baby she saved. Only years later did I discover the inspiration and tragedy associated with my paternal Mexican great-grandmother’s life. I’d never met her. She’d died over twenty years before I’d been born.

Do you have a specific writing style?

My stories tend to be plot driven, although I try to stay close to my point-of-view characters. I like to “show” rather than “tell” whenever I can.

How did you come up with the title of this book?

I’d gone through a number of potential titles during the writing process. When I sent my manuscript to Sand Hill Review Press, I’d entitled the novel “Woman of the Light.” That title hadn’t worked for the editor, so I chose The Engine Woman’s Light. I wanted potential readers

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

What we do can make a difference in the world.

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know, or events in your own life? Some experiences are based on events in my own life, as explained above. Also, I’ve hiked, camped, run rapids, ridden horseback and operated a steam locomotive.

What authors have most influenced your life? What about them do you find inspiring? I love the work of many authors, such as Neil Gaiman and Graham Joyce. I think, however, the work of children’s authors have had the biggest impact on my life. For example, Elizabeth Foster, author of Gigi: The Story of a Merry-Go-Round Horse, showed me the magic created when blending imagination with the reality of world conditions and history.

If you had to choose, is there a writer you consider a mentor? Why?

My mentor is Charlotte Cook, a writer, editor and dear friend. She has the ability to read a story and determine with ease what makes the piece work and what doesn’t.

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator? Julie Dillon,

Julie Dillon, winner of the Hugo and Chesley awards, designed the cover of The Engine Woman’s Light. I love the vibrancy of her art, and her breathtaking ability to portray diverse women protagonists.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

If you love a story that’s not working, don’t give up on it. Put it away for a while then take a fresh look. Read each page, then ask yourself if the text invites a reader to turn the page, and why?

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Thank you for reading my work! All the characters living in my head thank you as well.

EWL cover proof 2 RGB (4)_001Laurel Anne Hill
Orinda, California

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Author Interview: H. L. Burke

H. L. Burke is a writer of eclectic fantasy for young adults and children. She is also a semi-professional dragon keeper. Please welcome her to No Wasted Ink.

author-h-l-burkeMy name is Heidi, but I write as H. L. Burke because, while I appreciate that my mom likes classic children’s books about Swiss goatgirls, I really don’t think Heidi is a great name for a fantasy author. Just way too cute. Can’t go wrong with initials, right? I’m a part time writer, full-time mother, and military wife. My two young daughters and my gigantic orange cat argue about whose slave I am, and our German Shepherd never listens to me. I drink a lot of coffee.

When and why did you begin writing?

I’m a talker, and writing is like talking, just a little slower. I wrote short stories even before I could write, dictating to my mom, then illustrating them in crayon.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I took ownership of the title at a really young age. When it was the late 90s and all my friends got hotmail accounts, I had a mailing list of people who I’d send short stories to. I won a few small contests, and my peer group generally thought of me as “the writer.” Then there was a point that I stopped … but I always felt guilty about it, like I was letting down people who I knew in high school because I wasn’t writing any more, so eventually (after about maybe a five year break) I kicked myself in the pants and started again. That was about four years ago.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

My most recent book has the current title of Coiled. It is a fairy tale retelling based on an obscure French fairy tale called The Green Serpent which is in turn heavily influenced by Cupid and Psyche. It’s about a prince who turns into a giant snake whenever someone looks at him, so he befriends a princess with her own curse that has twisted her appearance to make her grotesque and courts her in darkness … of course, there’s a vengeful god who isn’t too happy about this and a quest that involves Gorgons and even a dragon. The book was recently picked up by Uncommon Universes Press and is due for June 2017 release.

My published book is Nyssa Glass and the House of Mirrors, a steampunk adventure. It was released in 2016.

What inspired you to write you published book?

The idea writing Nyssa Glass and the House of Mirrors was to reverse engineer a “puzzle game.” One of my favorite ways to relax is with a good puzzle/adventure game, and a lot of them have a similar premise: the protagonist (played by you) is trapped somewhere and has to navigate their way out while solving a mystery or putting together a story. So I worked backward from that and thought about a reason a person might have to break INTO some place and the sort of challenges they might face. Then I wondered who their companion would be, and what if there were killer robots … I loved coming up with the premise for this book and once the setting and the challenges were decided, I think it was probably the most effortless story I’ve ever written (helps that it’s a novella).

Do you have a specific writing style?

Conversational. I tend to be very to the point. I like each little detail to carry a lot of weight, so while I’m not a minimalist, I do tend towards sparser prose. I like things simple and sincere.

How did you come up with the title of this book?

My idea for Nyssa has always been that she’s reminiscent of a serial adventure heroine. Sort of a female Indiana Jones but trained as a cat burglar rather than an archaeologist, so having her name be the title was a given. The House of Mirrors refers to the primary antagonist. While Nyssa does face some human baddies, the thing that really has it out for her is the house itself. It has booby traps and killer robot sentries. The “creepy mansion” set the mood for the piece, and I wanted to put that in front of the reader from the get go. 

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

There is one that I cannot discuss without getting into spoilers, but it involves how different people deal with situations out of their control, whether with acceptance or anger. Also, throughout the series, there’s an underlying current of Nyssa trying to redeem herself from past sins and also of finding one’s family in people who are willing to love you in spite of your past.

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Nyssa is a lot like I imagine my young daughter will be when she grows up, sarcastic and smart but with a soft-center that would like to trust and which feels deeply for other people. The funny thing is I didn’t make the connection until after I’d written her. I think that’s one reason she appeals to me so much.

What authors have most influenced your life? What about them do you find inspiring?

I am a big time fan of J. R. R. Tolkien. He’s the only author I really obsess over, in that I’ve read biographies about him and collect books written about him as well as books written by him … but he’s kind of such a massive figure in fantasy that it’s almost a given. My personal writing style is more influenced by more modern YA Fantasy authors, specifically like Shannon Hale and Gail Carson Levine or Patricia Wrede, the ones I grew up reading. I love their fresh take on fairy tales.

If you had to choose, is there a writer would you consider a mentor?

I’m such an impossible student that any writer I chose would probably get really annoyed with me and it would totally ruin our (admittedly hypothetical) relationship. Seriously. Can I just have tea with Neil Gaiman instead? I really would like to have tea with Neil Gaiman.

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator?

I used my friend Jennifer for Nyssa. However, since I’m going with a publisher for my new book Coiled, they will be providing an in-house cover designer. For my other books, I started working with Jennifer because we’ve known each other since our days on a Tolkien Fan Forum … and we are both mothers of young children trying to balance creative-life with all that motherhood entails, so it was easy to work with her. I probably will continue to use her for my self-published projects.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

Never ask permission to make art. I see a lot of hesitant new writers wanting to know “am I any good?” (the answer is usually, “probably not yet, but you have to keep trying.”) or “is this idea worth writing?” (impossible to know until it has been written) or other versions of trying to get the approval of others before they begin. Just begin. Then get your work torn apart by a good critique group and start over … rinse and repeat until you rise from the ashes as a Mythical Writer Beast!

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Hey there! Theodore the Dragon says hi! (they’ll get that)

 

book-cover-nyssa-glassH. L. Burke
Oceanside, CA

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Author Interview: Angela Horst

Fantasy novels are particular favorites of mine to read, which makes introducing a new fantasy author to you a delight for me. Angela Horst is a local author and one that I believe you will like. Please welcome her to No Wasted Ink.

author-angela-horstHello! My name is Angela Horst and I’m a stay-at-home mother to an energetic, sometimes impish five-year-old. I’m an avid reader, gamer, and all-around geek. I worked at Blizzard Entertainment, a gaming company, before quitting to start my life as a mom. My husband worked there as well (he actually gave me the interview for the job!), and after getting to know one another, moving to Austin, and moving back to California, we eventually got married.

I tend to write and read in the fantasy genre. My favorite book of all time is The Last Unicorn by Peter S Beagle, though I do delve into other genres like Stephen King once in awhile.

When and why did you begin writing?

I began writing consistently in high school. Having a free period and study times, I found myself with the time to daydream and be creative. I read voraciously, sometimes under my desk during class (which is probably why I’m not the best at math). Reading gave me the motivation to write. It helped me to escape, and the ideas that other authors had would inspire me to make my own stories.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

The Nightmare Exterminator is a bit of an oddity. I’d call it magical realism, but there is also a pinch of paranormal, fantasy, and a good helping of humor. Noah Clifton has the ability to enter nightmares and rid them from a dreamer’s sleep – for the right price. His sidekick is a surly gnome named Guinness, and together they piece together clues in order to find out about Noah’s life before exterminating nightmares. Before he was even human.
What inspired you to write this book?

Funny enough, it was a dream! I had a vague sense of a man and gnome who defeated nightmares, and I used that skeleton to world-build around them.

Do you have a specific writing style?

For some unknown reason, it’s hard for me not to write as a first-person male. I can sneak in deeper thoughts with first person, and perhaps I write as male because I’m a tomboy? Whatever the reason, it does come with a drawback. It’s hard for me to get out of my comfort zone, though I do try to on some occasions as a challenge.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Not one that I thought about while writing. Noah is a jaded smart-alec who isn’t fond of human interaction at the beginning of the book. He is sarcastic and sees only the negative. By the end, this has lifted, and he is able to focus on enjoying life. If there is a message, I suppose it would be: don’t let life pass you by and live it to the fullest.

What authors have most influenced your life? What about them do you find inspiring?

Peter S Beagle has influenced my writing the most. He has my whimsicality and while this is not as prominent in The Nightmare Exterminator, I’ve grown to write in his style of flowery, descriptive writing. He is inspiring in that there are so many ideas and talent in one man. I met him at a book convention when I was young, and I’ve loved his books ever since.

If you had to choose, is there a writer would you consider a mentor? Why?

If not Mr. Beagle, I would say Brandon Sanderson. This man has a way with world-building that is second to none. I am a terrible world-builder. I’m good with details and scenes, but world-building is not my strong point. Mr. Sanderson can do it in his sleep. His book, Mistborn, has inspired me to be more aware of an over-arcing story and epic storyline when writing my own books.
Do you have any advice for other writers?

Never stop reading. Reading is the best tool for a writer. Words, worlds, even sentence structure can cause inspiration. Have an idea that’s sparked from another author’s writing? Write it! Of course, make it your own. Add the flourishes that make you you. Tap into that creativity and let your muse do its job.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

I appreciate any eyes I can get on my novel, and I wanted to thank Wendy Van Camp for allowing me this interview on No Wasted Ink. I wish nothing more than a reader of my novel to realize it’s 2 AM when they look up from their tablet. I want to take you on a journey, to escape the real world if even for a moment to show you my pride and joy. And hey, maybe you’ll dream about Noah and his companions when you fall asleep. Maybe they’ll come along during a nightmare and do what they do best.

Thank you, Angela.  It is always my pleasure to help fellow authors.

the-nightmare-exterminator-book-coverAngela Horst

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Author Interview: Heather Rivera

Being a writer makes even the mundane fascinating for Author Heather Rivera. She sees a story everywhere. To her, it is breathing through words. Please welcome her to No Wasted Ink.

author-heather-riveraMy name is Dr. Heather Rivera. I am a past life researcher and author. I became fascinated with past lives after I had a profound healing during a past life experience. After that experience, I got certified as hypnotherapist specializing in past life regression. I trained under Dr. Brian Weiss and discussed with him my idea for a doctoral dissertation study. He encouraged me to pursue my idea. I did a study measuring the benefits of past life regression therapy. It was published in a peer-reviewed journal and my first book, Healing the Present from the Past, covered the study and my story of healing. I have a PhD in Parapsychic Science, a doctorate in law, and I’m a Registered Nurse. I founded a past life research institute with my husband, Mark. Mark is a physicist and our institute’s science adviser. Our children are grown and on their own. Recently we found out that we are soon going to be first-time grandparents.

When and why did you begin writing?

I wrote my first poem when I was five years old. I thought it was quite good. After that, I was hooked. I wrote poetry for many years, some short stories, and children’s stories. As an adult, I wrote for magazines. Later I moved on to writing books. I write non-fiction, fiction, and young readers.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

That’s difficult for me to answer. At times I felt like a writer and then doubt crept back in. This may be a common theme with writers as our esteem tends to fluctuate. I am not sure of the exact date that I felt with some certainty that I was a writer and it wasn’t a passing phase.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

My latest book is called “Inside the Crystal”. It is the third book in my Prism Walker series. These are fantasy/adventure books for young readers ages 8-12. The books follow the adventures of three children, Sara, Molly, and Leo. They find out that they are Prism Walkers and with the help of prism can cross realms and enter magical worlds. They are called upon to help with missions and save the inhabitants of Exaltia. The books have many magical creatures, including elves, sprites, and dragons.

What inspired you to write this book?

A young fan asked her grandmother for the next book in the series and at that time I didn’t know there would be a third. The grandmother wrote to me regarding her granddaughter’s request and the next thing I know I story came to me.

Do you have a specific writing style?

I would say I am a hybrid. I don’t extensively outline but also don’t write by the seat of my pants. I like to create a timeline of events and then leave room for the muse to deviate from the timeline.

How did you come up with the title of this book?

The first book in the series is called “Into Exaltia.” The second book is called “In Search of Emerald Bay.” I wanted to start the third title with “in,” and “Inside the Crystal” worked well with the story.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Although the series contains themes of cooperation, resourcefulness, and thinking independently, my goal is to provide a fun adventure for readers to enjoy.

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

The idea for the book came from a dream as do most of my books. I did tap into my own childhood when creating the characters, Sara, Molly, and Uncle Henry. And, the grandmother’s house is based on my grandma’s house when I was growing up.

What authors have most influenced your life? What about them do you find inspiring?

T.S. Eliot’s poem “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” comforted me as a teen and rolls around in my head to this day. I memorized it when I was seventeen. Anne Rice’s books are beautifully written. Her language is lyrical and mesmerizing. I also appreciate her advice to writers. She inspires me.

If you had to choose, is there a writer would you consider a mentor? Why?

The first writer that comes to mind is Stephen King. His book, “On Writing” was encouraging and helpful. It continues to be one of my favorite books about writing.

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator?

My cover designer is Laura Gordon Moyer. Martin Kaspar is the illustrator for the Prism Walker series and he creates the color images that Laura incorporates into a cover. She keeps a consistent theme throughout the series. She also designed my Golden Raven series. The Golden Raven series are past life/paranormal books for adults. I chose Laura after I saw some of her work on her website. She is talented and very reasonably priced.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

I offer book coaching/mentoring for writers and help writers stay focused and inspired so that they can have the joy of seeing their completed project. I discuss my process, how to get unstuck, and how to keep motivated. For my own projects, I like to create a large poster that has pictures of my characters, items of significance to the story, maps, and the timeline. If I’m stuck I go for a walk and soon the characters begin speaking to me again. I always let a story sit for a while before working on revisions and before I send the manuscript to beta readers I read the entire manuscript aloud. I have caught many hiccups this way.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

I am grateful to my supportive readers. Their kind words, emails, and reviews lift my spirits and make my fingers type a little bit faster.

into-exaltiaHeather Friedman Rivera
Huntington Beach, CA

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INTO EXALTIA

Publisher: Muse & Ink
Cover Artist: Laura Gordon Moyer

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