Tag Archives: science fiction

Author interview: jared k chapman

When I asked Author Jared Chapman about his writing, he replied: I love taking established tropes in the genres I write in and then flipping them on their heads, turning them inside out, and finding new ways to blow readers minds. I love filling my stories with Easter eggs that readers only pick up on second and third readings, because that’s when they get super excited and I know I’ve done my job. Please give him a warm welcome here on No Wasted Ink.

Greetings. I’m Jared K Chapman, not to be confused with Jared Chapman children’s author/illustrator, although we both lived in Austin in 2002. I was born in south central California to a farmer’s daughter and an engineer in petroleum. I didn’t crawl. I went right to walking around. I guess I had places to go, people to see. My dad’s job took us to Calgary, Alberta, but by 5 years old my mother moved my kid sister and I back to her father’s farm in California. I grew up in a fundamentalist Christian area and got kicked out of Sunday School for asking too many questions. From age 10 to 14, I spent my school years with my father in Canada and summers with my mom. The experience gave me a diverse perspective.

I have degrees in religious studies and psychology, and I’m currently working on my PhD with a focus on extremism through the lens of social psychology. I also have a fondness for science fiction, fantasy, and horror, having grown up reading books by Ray Bradbury, Anne MacCaffrey, and Stephen King, and an array of comic books. I share these interests, whether they like it or not, with my wife and three sons.

When and why did you begin writing?

My mother would probably tell you I’m a born storyteller. I’ve been writing as long as I remember being able to write. One of my first memories is having a short illustrated story published in a book with other kids in my 3rd or 4th grade class. Seeing it in print blew my mind and made me want to do that again. I remember writing a novel in 6th grade that was a kind of mish-mash of Star Wars and Star Trek. I think I wrote it to see what others thought about my story, because I passed it around to fellow students and never got it back.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I began writing a novel in 1996… something I’m still working on. I think the moment I allowed someone to read that was the moment I thought of myself as a writer. That’s when I believed I was going to become a writer. Unfortunately, life got in the way, but I’m finding my way back now.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

My debut novel, 2HVØRHVNØT: To Have or Have Not, is essentially a murder mystery thriller set in a futuristic dystopia where the superpowered Haves known as the Mighty are the majority, and they oppress the powerless Have Nots. Mario wakes up late for work and misses his bus into the city. While waiting in the long line of other workers, an adjudicator arrests him for the murder of his employer, a Mighty restaurateur. He must race against time to prove his innocence and help those who oppress him to survive the onslaught of the real killer. However, Mario is not the only primary protagonist. When his kid sister, Zelda, suspects he is in danger, she finds her way into the city in search of her brother, the only person she has left in the world. While on the hunt, she discovers a dark secret the Mighty would never want her or anyone else to know.

What inspired you to write this book?

I had a thought in my head about “to be or not to be” but applying it to the situation of haves and have-nots, which resulted in the title “to have or not to have.” I thought that was too presumptuous and cumbersome, so I kept thinking and though To Have or Have Not sounded much better, and I am a Hemingway fan, so there’s a little homage there. I kept thinking and thinking about this title and one day while driving home the numeronym popped into my head 2HVORHVNOT. I thought that would be a cool title for a book, so I began to think what a book with that title would be about.

I immediately thought about a tattooed identity code on someone’s arm. I thought about how it could be scanned and used in the future like credit cards, but I thought that was too obvious and really wasn’t sure what the story would be. Poor people are Have Nots and can’t even use their codes while the rich people can… it seemed like something I’ve seen many times before. So, my mind went somewhere darker. What if only the Have Nots have these identity codes and they’re forced on them? I began to think about the Holocaust and poor lives lost in the camps. I began to think about Nietzche’s idea of the Ubermensch inspiring the Nazis. I began to think about Japanese internment camps and signs that said No Jews Allowed or Colored Only Section. I began thinking about the X-Men stories where normal people wanted to round up the mutants and put them into camps. Then, I thought what if that was flipped. What if the people in power, the majority, were the ones with superpowers.

I started to think about what kind of world that would be. I drew upon a lot of the social psychological theories I had learned through the course of my collegiate life. I found myself really drawn to Sherif, Asch, Milgram, and Zimbardo’s famous experiments. Ultimately, I wanted to delve into conflict resolution between two completely different groups. I also drew upon my religious studies and my interest in science-fiction/fantasy, post-apocalyptic/dystopia speculative fiction, particularly 1984, Brave New World, Fahrenheit 451, The Dark Tower Series, Running Man, Demolition Man, Minority Report, and Ready Player One. All of these inspired me to create the world of Fellowship City.

In Fellowship City, there is a caste system with the highest, most powerful Mighty being the telepathic seers, monks of Sol & Luna, who police the other Mighty. This creates a world without heroes or villains, because the monks stop any crime or wrongdoing, even wrong-thinking before it happens. They eliminate the bad elements to create a utopian world for them, but in doing so, life is mundane. Their superpowers are meaningless. In this world, a pyrokinetic has a job as a barista reheating coffee in the ceramic mugs of old customers. But in nearly every utopia we find some dystopian element, and for those without powers, this world is a nightmare. They are forced to serve the Mighty, live in camps or slums, and must be tattooed with their scannable identity codes.

Do you have a specific writing style?

Varied. Sometimes I outline. Sometimes I fly by the seat of my pants. Sometimes it’s a little of both. Sometimes I write in first person and other times in third. Sometimes I write in present tense and other times in past tense. Whatever I do, however, I try to be as consistent as possible. But it all depends on the story I’m trying to tell.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

At the core of it, my book is about how embracing diversity in skills and thoughts, not judging a book by its cover, nor dehumanizing others, are the only ways we can overcome that which might kill us all.

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know, or events in
your own life?

I think we, as writers, always draw inspiration from our own experiences or from those we know. There are definitely some small moments that were inspired by real experiences, but if I did my job well, the reader will not uncover which ones are real and which are pure fantasy.

What authors have most influenced your life? What about them do you
find inspiring?

I believe my three biggest influences are Stephen King, Ray Bradbury, and Anne MacCaffrey because their books were my gateway into real novels. Before reading their books, I read books made for kids. When I was 10, I read Misery and it blew my mind. After that, I remember finding Dragonriders of Pern books in the school library and devouring them. However, Fahrenheit 451 was the book that made me question reality and made me believe I could do that too. They all created wonderfully vivid worlds, sometimes vibrant and colorful, but other times dark and dreary. I think their ability to create such worlds is what I found most inspiring.

If you had to choose, is there a writer would you consider a mentor? Why?

Stephen King. He is a legend. He’s published over 60 books and he’s only 73. Imagine how many others he wrote that weren’t published. The guy is a machine. I just wish I could be 1/10th of what he is. He’s like the end goal that I aspire to be like. I know I’ll never achieve what he has, but that’s okay. I just want to be 1/10th of what he is… and direct a feature film. He did that. I want to do that too.

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator?

Derek Smith is the artist who designed the cover. I met him in 2011 when he began dating a good friend of the woman I was dating. We married those women within six months of one another and our babies are eight months apart. He is an amazing artist, and I approached him in 2012 about doing the art for a graphic novel I was writing. I wrote it, but he got busy with his day job touring the world, drumming for a band, so we never completed the graphic novel. I decided to write it as a novel instead, so I could proceed without his art. When I completed the novel, I asked if he would do the cover because it was always meant to be a project we were doing together. Someday, we will go back to the graphic novel. You can find him at https://www.facebook.com/kickitlikebonham and https://www.instagram.com/dereksmithart/.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

I waited too long to publish because I didn’t have confidence in my work. Don’t do that. You are the only person who can tell your story the way you want it to be told. So, write it and don’t be afraid to show it to people. Also, don’t have a big head about it. Be open to others’ critiques, challenges, and changes they may introduce. Those ideas may help you more than you know. It’s never too late to start. I’m 43 and this is my debut novel. I wish I had begun 20 years ago, but here I am now, and wishing only gets you so far. If you need help, there are people and companies out there who can help. I needed my confidence boosted and help on how to get published, so I found a program. Message me if you want to know about it. Otherwise, keep writing. Write every day. Only stop to send pages to the editor. Publish!

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

I grew up in the 80s, watching Saturday morning cartoons followed by wrestling, reading comic books with superheroes and books by Stephen King and Ray Bradbury, and sneaking into B-Movie slasher flicks to watch the ridiculous blood and guts spray across the screen. I loved Star Wars, Star Trek, Indiana Jones, The Last Starfighter, Ghostbusters, Gremlins, Goonies, and Monster Squad. I write stories that I want to read, and they are influenced by those early interests. I also studied religion, psychology, anthropology, film, and creative writing in college, and those academic experiences influenced how I see the world and how I write about it. I’ve also dealt with abuse, neglect, and instability when I should’ve been a kid enjoying all those things. The worlds I create and write in reflect all of that. My goal is to make my readers feel something viscerally in a world of my creation. I hope I do that, because it’s the best part of being a writer.


Jared K Chapman
Los Angeles, CA

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2HVØRHVNØT: To Have or Have Not

Cover Artist: Derek Smith
Publisher: Apotheosis Press

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Author Interview: R.M. Olson

R.M. Olson is the author of the Ungovernable series. She promises she hasn’t done all the things she writes about. Honest.  Please welcome her to No Wasted Ink.

Author Ruth OlsenMy name is R.M. Olson. I’m a Canadian, a lawyer, an author, and the mother of four kiddos. I love to travel, and I admit, I’m a bit of an adrenaline junkie–I’ve jumped off the highest bungee jump in the world, trekked across mountains in pouring summer storms, gone cage diving with great white sharks, and maybe most frightening of all, taken all four of my kids on a three-day backcountry camping trip all by myself. I’m an unrepentant bookworm, and always have been. I love corny jokes, campfires, and hot tea, preferably all together. Autumn is my favorite time of year, and I’ll never get tired of the sight and smell of leaves the colour of sunshine against a grey autumn sky.

When and why did you begin writing?

I’ve been writing for as long as I can remember. I think my first completed work was when I was about six. I’d heard my parents talking about Shakespeare’s tragedies and decided it couldn’t be that difficult. And it wasn’t. I killed off my MC and his entire family and all his friends in the course of about three pages. Not sure even the Bard beat that record.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Only about five years ago, honestly. Although I’ve been writing my whole life, that was when I first started taking it seriously–working intentionally on my craft, querying, and putting in a sustained daily effort to writing.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

Well, I write fairly quickly, so my current WIP changes on a regular basis. But I can tell you a bit about my series. I’m currently finishing up a space opera science fiction series that follows the adventures of a motley group of ex-cons and their mysterious leader. It’s called The Ungovernable, and it’s a sort of Ocean’s Eleven meets Firefly, with all my favourite tropes–laser guns, smugglers, explosions, heists, jailbreaks, deep-space casinos, carnivorous plants, political intrigue, and most of all, a fumbling, ridiculous, and ultimately loveable found-family crew.

What inspired you to write this book?

I’m a sucker for clever heists, and for sprawling space adventures, enemies-to-friends, groups of clever misfits who love each other in spite of their quirks or even because of them, and lots of action. I’d just finished watching Ocean’s Eight yet again and I thought, why not do something like that, but in space? And so The Ungovernable was born.

Do you have a specific writing style?

My style tends to be fairly fast-paced–lots of action, snappy dialogue, never too long between something exciting happening, but ultimately character-focused. There’s usually romance, but it’s usually slow-burn. One of my beta readers left a comment once that sums up my style pretty well, I think. She commented, “I was expecting sexytimes, and instead I got a near death experience!” And that basically says everything there is to say about how I write.

How did you come up with the title of this book?

Ha ha, it wasn’t easy. I spent a lot of time consulting with friends about it. But ultimately, the series title, The Ungovernable, is the name of the crew’s ship, and the title of each book is based off a hacker/computer term, since hacking plays a big part in the plots. The titles of the released and upcoming books are Zero Day Threat, Jailbreak, Time Bomb, Insider Threat, Blacklist, Trojan Horse, Blue Team, Attack Path, and Threat Agent. You get a point for each of the terms you can identify without looking them up!

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Honestly, as much as these books are all about the action, their real message is friendship–about learning to love people for who they are, and learning to be loved for who you are. About the kind of friendship that means they see you at your ugliest, and your weakest, and your stupidest and most awkward–and they love you anyways.

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Well–there’s a lot of me in Jez. I’m also ADHD and bi, and I certainly had a lot of the same feelings of alienation and not fitting in as she has throughout the series because of those things. And I, too, have managed to stumble into a group of friends who I could count on at any time and for anything. And the world itself is based in large part on places I’ve traveled–a year or so before I started this series, I traveled across Siberia on the Trans-Siberian railway, and I fell in love with the mix of cultures and the complex history of that area of the world. A lot of that found its way into the world I created for these books.

What authors have most influenced your life? What about them do you find inspiring?

I’ve always loved Terry Pratchett. I love his ability to make you think while making you laugh, and to portray the ugliness in the world while still believing that people are basically good. I love Neil Geiman and Harper Lee for much the same reason. And while I only wish I could compare my writing to any of theirs, I hope that at least I can manage, in my own awkward way, to convey a similar message.

If you had to choose, is there a writer would you consider a mentor? Why?

Hmmm. That’s a tough one. If I had to pick, I think I’d go back to Sir Terry. There is so much about his writing that I’ve loved and studied, and he deeply inspires the way I write and the things I chose to write about to this day.

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator?

The first three covers were designed by Jesh Studios. He’s a fantastic artist, and was able to put down on paper what I had in my head for these characters. I loved every one of his covers, but because of unforeseen circumstances, he was unable to complete the covers after book three. I switched to KDS Cover Concepts, because I was looking for someone who could work in a similar style, and I’ve absolutely loved her work. I’d highly recommend her.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

Just keep writing–don’t let rejection discourage you. It’s part of the process, and it forces you to improve. I thought I’d be ready to publish when I wrote my first book. But looking back, I’m so glad that book wasn’t published. My writing has improved and deepened so much since then. I have several manuscripts and short stories that I submitted to agents and publications that were rejected over and over. But each time I re-wrote them, or wrote something new, I got a little bit better. And as much as it was frustrating at the time, that was when I really started to hone my craft–when people stopped praising me and were honest enough to tell me I needed to improve.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

First, a heart-felt thank you for reading. I’d be a writer no matter what, but I couldn’t be an author without you. So thank you for letting me live my dream. And I hope that somehow, my crazy crew of misfits has brightened your day, made a rough week a little better, or maybe showed you that you don’t need to change who you are in order to be loved. You just need to find your people. And they’re out there, whoever you are–even if you’re an irritating ADHD ex-smuggler pilot with a penchant for getting into trouble. ❤

The UngovernableR.M. Olson
Calgary Alberta, Canada

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The Ungovernable

Cover Artist: Jesh Art Studio ( https://jeshartstudio.com/)

All my books are only available on Amazon. Here’s a link in the US store to the series page:

And here are universal links for the four books that are currently released (although I can update this again before the interview goes live, as there will likely be another one or two out by then.)
Zero Day Threat
https://www.bklnk.com/B088C4FYPN
Jailbreak
https://www.bklnk.com/B0883Z4L3W
Time Bomb
https://www.bklnk.com/B088F6756J
Insider Threat
https://www.bklnk.com/B08F76MC75

Author Interview: Rick Graham

Author Rick Graham has just the right amount of madness to attempt to build an expansive science fiction universe, but enough stubbornness to stick with it when it gets tough. Please welcome him to No Wasted Ink.

Author Rick GrahamHey everyone! I’m R. E. Graham, but you can call me Rick. From being a husband, father of 2 (with another arriving in December 2020), full-time small business owner, and more, there is no shortage of plates to keep spinning. Yet, I wouldn’t trade it for all the money in the world.

When and why did you begin writing?

I have wanted to be an author for a very long time. However, I lacked the confidence to even attempt it over ten years ago. Finally, I got the courage to take a chance and give it a shot. There were some bumpy roads for a while, but I now get to work on something that is a dream for so many others. One of the best things about being an author is to give life to the stories that are burning within me to be told.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Honestly, I didn’t consider myself a writer until somewhere around my third novel’s release. By then I had written some not-so-great non-fiction books (my first attempts into writing), short stories, and then three novels. For whatever reason, I still didn’t think of myself as an author, not deep down. It sounds strange in a way, but it took a while for me to catch on.

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

I am building a vast SciFi brand with many stories still to be told. Honestly, I’m already moving on to the fourth in a series within the Revelations Universe, but my last release was “Revelations: Spectre”. It is a revenge story about an ex-bounty hunter who was the deadliest warrior in the ‘verse. One day he suddenly leaves it all behind and just wants to live a normal life. However, after a tragic incident (no spoilers!) he comes out of retirement to get his revenge. I describe the main character, Gideon Adama, as John Wick mixed with Boba Fett. There is a lot of fast-paced action, but there is also a great deal of universe building seeded here and there. While this story is a stand-alone novel, it fits within the larger context of Revelations.

What inspired you to write this book?

I was in the middle of my Kingdom of Sand series and was feeling a bit burned out creatively. After getting some serious inspiration, a story began to form in my head without much effort. I was so excited about it I just had to tell it. Currently, it is one of my best sellers, so I am very glad I followed my instinct on that one.

Do you have a specific writing style?

I do. When I am working on a project I am focused on telling it in such a way that the reader has enough detail of what’s around them, but what matters most are the characters. I want the story to flow well between action and dialogue, with the intention that each of the characters feels like a real person.

How did you come up with the title of this book?

It isn’t as glamorous as some of my other projects, it just went off of the name of the nickname of the main character.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Spectre is connected to the Revelations Universe as a whole. It shows one perspective in a sea of others. Each with their own desires, aspirations, fears, pain, and more. Some elements are hinted at, to add threads that will be connected later on.

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator?

The process for my novel covers is probably a bit different than most other authors. I hire an illustrator to create an original illustration making sure that it is designed in such a way that it can be used for a book cover. My wife then takes the image and creates the book cover. We chose this process so that I would have clean artwork that I could use in other ways such as social media posts, promotional images, or other options down the road.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

Absolutely. Both of these points are both easy to say but extremely tough to follow. The first is that you need to take small steps. Don’t try and write a novel if you’ve never written anything before. I would instead recommend that you invest the time in writing a short story. This allows you to go through many of the same steps that a novel will, just on a much smaller and easier to achieve scale. Completing a short story will give you confidence to try a larger project, and then another, until you’re ready to tackle a full-sized novel.

The second piece of advice I would say is that you should be careful not to compare your works to those who are huge successes. They got to where they are from a multitude of factors. What matters here and now is that you write. Marketing, building your reader community, email lists, and all of that comes once you have a book to sell. Focus on first things first.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Revelations is just getting started! Currently we are sitting at five novels, with another on the way soon. More are lined up behind that, not counting additional releases for our table-top game, Revelations: Skirmish, and so much more. There is no shortage of Revelations content to come.

Spectre Book CoverR. E. Graham
Seminole, Florida

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Revelations: Spectre

Cover Artist: Ozaakhmad

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THE PLANETS a scifaiku poetry collection by Wendy Van Camp

The Planets: a scifaiku poetry collection

THE PLANETS: a scifaiku poetry collection
written and illustrated by Wendy Van Camp

The planets have fascinated humanity since the dawn of time. We’ve looked up into the heavens and wondered what these wandering stars are and why they are different from their more stationary cousins. In modern times, humans have sent probes to all the planets in our solar system, sending back tantalizing views from faraway worlds. The planets are woven into our culture and history. They are signposts of our journey ahead.

This collection of 108 science fiction haiku poems (scifaiku) will take you on a journey of exploration showcasing tiny moments of wonder with each of the planets of our solar system.

THE PLANETS: a scifaiku poetry collection is nominated for the 2020 Elgin Award for best speculative poetry book of the year.

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Author Interview: Jeannette Bedard

By day Author Jeannette Bedard is a scientist, by night she writes science fiction. Her stories are filled with action and adventure where something always blows up, usually in the first fifty pages. Please welcome her to No Wasted Ink.

Author Jeannette BedardHi, I’m Jeannette and I write science fiction. As soon as I was old enough to leave home, I set off after adventure. So far, my non-linear career path has included serving in the army and working as a scientist in the Arctic. I have more degrees than I need and even through my current day job keeps me desk bound, I still daydream about going on adventures (and I will someday). I live on an island off the west coast of Canada with my husband and daughter. The nerd in me really likes math jokes, especially if there’s pi involved.

When and why did you begin writing?

For me, storytelling didn’t start with writing. As a child I suffered from insomnia combined with an overactive imagination. Whenever I couldn’t sleep, I just made up stories to entertain myself (I still do this). It wasn’t until I was in the middle of my undergraduate degree that it dawned on me others might enjoy my stories too and I started writing them down.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I only started considering myself a writer when I published my first novel Day 115 on an Alien World (which was the 5th complete novel I wrote).

Can you share a little about your current book with us?

Years ago I read Ice Station Zebra — a cold war thriller set on a submarine operating under the Arctic ice. I read the novel long enough ago that only one thing sticks out in my mind about it — the submarine had a saboteur on board, a terrifying thing in a confined space.

This hypothetical fear percolated to the surface of my mind after I read The Martian, science fiction set in the not so distant future. I already harboured a fascination about biodomes, closed ecosystems cut-off from the outside. Why not put a saboteur on a dome on a far-off world? From this question, Day 115 on an Alien World arose.

The original idea morphed into a series of four books, the finale I published last summer.

What inspired you to write this book?

Once the idea was in my head, I had to write it down—but the timing was not ideal. I was in the middle of a PhD program and just had a baby. It wasn’t inspiration that put the novel on paper, more dogged persistence and sleep deprivation combined with a dash of craziness.

Do you have a specific writing style?

I consider the craft of my writing to be a work in progress—one which I’ll never finish. I’m always trying to improve. I try to make my characters and settings quirky while adding just a touch of humour.

How did you come up with the title of this book?

The title Day 115 on an Alien World came about after I discovered that a blue morpho butterfly only lives 115 days—a fact my protagonist, a lepidopterist, would know. Also, having a number in the title really appeals to me.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

On the surface, the book is full of action and adventure, but deep down it’s about fitting in—a theme that often emerges in my writing.

Are experiences in this book based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Unfortunately (or perhaps fortunately), I’ve never lived under a domed on an alien world—so no, it’s not about events in my life. I did, however, take elements from what I know to add flavour to life on an alien world. Like a conversation I had in the grocery story about rambutan fruit (that they looked like muppet testicles) to some of my experiences in the army.

What authors have most influenced your life? What about them do you find inspiring?

Mary Roach’s Packing For Mars started me thinking about writing after a long dry spell. Its a non-fiction account of all the science that is going into putting people in space. I love how she presents science with such humour and delight.

Rendezvous with Rama by Arthur C. Clark was the first adult science fiction novel I ever read— more than twenty years ago and still think about how alien the ship they explored was.

Becky Chambers’ A Closed and Common Orbit is a recent favourite In fact, I’ve loved every one of her books because she’s created a rich future world that I could live in. But the second one in her series really resonated with me because it was about fitting in.

If you had to choose, is there a writer would you consider a mentor? Why?

I’ve reread Becky Chambers books multiple times trying to figure out how I could write more like her—does that count?

Who designed the cover of your book? Why did you select this illustrator?

Tiffany Catron designed the cover of Day 115 on an Alien World, unfortunately she doesn’t make covers any more. It was important to me that the cover have a solo astronaut on the cover walking on a barren world.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

Write lots, and lots more. Also, expect your first drafts to suck. The hardest part for me is starting with a blank page—but once I suffer through writing that first draft, I shape it into something.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Thank you for reading!

Day 115 on an Alien WorldJeannette Bedard
Victoria, British Columbia

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