Tag Archives: writer

No Wasted Ink Writers Links

No Wasted Ink Writers Links

Happy Monday! It is time for another top ten writing craft articles from No Wasted Ink. Most of these are writing tip articles, but a few are marketing and formatting related. I hope you enjoy them!

7 Questions to Design a Better Arc of Change for Your Protagonist

Novel Revision Checklist

How to Promote Your Reader Magnet

Turning Your Indie Book into an Audiobook

Fantasy and Science Fiction as Invented History

8 Ways to Avoid Cardboard Characters (and Plot Contrivances While You’re At It)

A Perspective on Writing

Writing Rules: How & Why We Play ‘Follow the Reader’

Six Sloppy Character Arcs in Popular Stories

When Story Is Medicine

No Wasted Ink Writers Links

No Wasted Ink Writers Links

Welcome to another set of top ten writing craft links here on No Wasted Ink. These are articles that I personally found useful to me as a writer and poet and I share them here with you on this blog. I hope you find them as useful as I did.


ToFu For Novelists

The Fantastic Novels of Harlan Ellison

The Monster You Feed: Mental Health in Fiction

Proof reading on the Remarkable 2

Three Benefits to Speaking at Industry Conferences

Authors on Editors

6 Ways to Find Your Best Ideas Before You Start Writing

Writing Journals, Notebooks, and the Commonplace Book as Useful Tools for Book Writers

Tailoring a Writing Space to Suit Your Needs

The Fundamentals of Flashbacks

No Wasted Ink Writers Links

No Wasted Ink Writers Links

Happy Monday! Are you ready for more writing links from No Wasted Ink? This week I not only have great craft articles for you, but a few on the life of writers as well. I hope you enjoy them!


Finding Me: Towards Self-Actualization in Writing

Marketing Ethics: Selling Doesn’t Have to Be Sleazy (5 Real-World Examples)

10 Facts You May Not Know About Jane Austen and Her Novels

Trust the Magic

Create Your Own Writing Space at Home

Characters, Cultures, and Groups

The 6 Challenges of Writing a Second Novel

Narrative Perspectives, Which Will Serve Your Story Best?

Does My Protagonist Have to Solve the Problem?

What is Rhythmic Writing?

Write What You Know by Cindy Tomamichel

Photo by Gift Habeshaw on Unsplash

I generally dislike the advice ‘write what you know’ since it conjures up mages of creative writing classes writing about having coffee and writing or similar boring literary scenes. Where is the space for flights of fancy, of flying rainbow pooping unicorns or space battles in the year 3121? Do sentient cats get a look in, or cybernetic dogs, or… Well, you get the picture.

However, on a small scale it does have merit. An experience that you have can be slotted into any sort of novel. I remember reading ‘Murder in Mesopotamia’ by Agatha Christie and marvelling at the depth of detail that perfectly described the daily life of an archaeologist. Of course, she knew – she married one and spent time on digs. This time she no doubt ploughed for her novels ‘Death on the Nile’ and “They came to Bagdad’.
For myself, I have worked underground as a geologist, so I have a romance book with a female geologist and an archaeologist which uses some of this career. (Rocky Road to Love). But I also have an unpublished scifi set on an underground mining planet full of predatory mutants and lethal female mercenaries. Totally different books, but they both use my personal experiences as a mine geologist.

Or it might be a person you met. Not necessarily someone you hate and kill off in a gory fashion, but a habit, a look or an actor. For one of my SMP Druids Portal books, I relaxed watching (way too often) Aquaman movie trailers, and so my hero looked a lot like Jason Moama, and I had to retrofit a grandson to be physically bigger, and joke about an unknown giant in their ancestry, as he was bigger than his parents. Another book I was writing and went to a music gig at a pub, and the character walked across the room and into my novel and acquired a name from a song. It was a magical moment.

So you can write what you know, but not verbatim, obviously. How far can your imagination twist your own experiences? Quite a distance! Otherwise, my novels would feature a crazy cat lady and her love of cardigans, rather than action adventures in time and space.


Cindy Tomamichel is a multi-genre writer. Escape the everyday with the time travel action adventure series Druid’s Portal, science fiction / fantasy and romance short story collections. Discover worlds where the heroines don’t wait to be rescued, and the heroes earn that title the hard way.

Writers struggling with social media and platform building can get some practical organization help in the free “30 Organizing Tips for Writers” book. Doing NaNo this year? Grab my free help booklet ‘NaNoWriMo Ready’.

Contact or follow Cindy on:

Website: https://www.cindytomamichel.com/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CindyTomamichelAuthor/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/CindyTomamichel
Amazon: https://amazon.com/author/cindytomamichel
Newsletter: https://tinyurl.com/AdventureNews
Bookbub: https://www.bookbub.com/profile/cindy-tomamichel

No Wasted Ink Writers Links

No Wasted Ink Writers Links

Happy Monday! It is time for the No Wasted Ink Top-Ten writing links! These are articles of use to the science fiction and fantasy author. I hope you enjoy them!


Elmer Bernstein at 100


Jack L. Chalker Young Writers’ Contest Winners


I Feel Funny: Humor Writing Tips for Novelists


The Importance of Putting Yourself into Your Scripts


On Launching Nonfiction Books for Writers


Five Secondary Character Arcs to Strengthen Your Cast


Get, or Keep, a Life


14 Tips for Dealing With the Passage of Time in a Story


Is It a Problem for a Disability to Be Integral to the Plot?


Foreshadowing: A Revision Skill to Love