Tag Archives: writer

No Wasted Ink Writers Links

No Wasted Ink Writers Links

Happy Monday! It is time for the top-ten writing articles from No Wasted Ink. I admit, I needed to surf twice as long for articles this week. Writers were taking a vacation or doing holiday related articles for the most part and I wanted to find things with more useful content. I found a good batch and I hope you’ll enjoy them.


International Interactions with Tolkien – A Roundtable

Breaking Into Publishing Isn’t Easy, but if You’re Not in America, It’s Even Harder

Writing Goals: Clearing Your Path For Creativity In The New Year

Why Book Reviews Are Important and Where to Find Them

How to Write When You’re Not Writing

Five Unnecessary World Additions in Popular Stories

How to Write a Compelling Antihero

2022 Publishing Predictions

Journals adopt AI to spot duplicated images in manuscripts

Trusting the Reader

No Wasted Ink Writers Links

No Wasted Ink Writers Links


Welcome to No Wasted Ink’s top-ten writing articles as selected from my general surfing of the world wide web. I love to read writing articles to help me keep up with what is going on in the writing community and to learn new tips to improve my writing. I select the best ten from those and share them here with you. Enjoy.

On Trauma-Informed Writing

Mythic Structure: Refusal of the Call to Adventure

How Symbolism Adds Depth to a Story

Amazon Keywords And Atticus For Writing And Book Formatting With Dave Chesson

Nicola Barker is Our Great Post-Punk Novelist

Words Without Borders: Kaaps Writings From South Africa

When—and Whether—to Hire a Developmental Editor

4 Lessons Learned from Writing Down the Bones by Natalie Goldberg

Build mysteries around whether characters will succeed or fail

Independent Publishing: Off The Beaten Path

No Wasted Ink Writers Links

No Wasted Ink Writers Links


Happy Monday! Welcome to the No Wasted Ink top-ten writing article round-up. As I surf the web, I look for articles that interest me as a writer and then share them here on the blog with all of you. This week I found many with writing tips, marketing help for authors and other topics of interest. I hope you get as much from them as I did. Enjoy.

Guest Posting Best Practices for Serious Writers

Why Writing Second Person POV Appeals To Marginalized Writers

Your Massively Transformative Purpose

What Can You Get Away With In Fiction?

Using Magnets to Attract Readers

Talk is Cheap: Harness the True Power of Dialogue

Keeping Readers Happy With Your Novel Series

When Are You Ready for Professional Editing?

Short Stories As The Basis To An Award-Winning Author Career With Alan Baxter

Uses for Scrivener Beyond the Manuscript

Creating Credible Characters by Valerie Holmes

Photo by Dave Lowe on Unsplash

No matter what genre of novel a writer creates, a protagonist lies at its heart. Whether an alien, a mythical beast, or a human the reader will want to connect with them. Why else would they continue to read on to discover what path and challenges are ahead? In a romance it is the two main characters that take centre stage as their relationship forms, is thwarted but ultimately endures. In other genres the reader may follow a single protagonist to a satisfactory, if not, a happy ending.

The writer’s aim is to convince the reader to believe in these characters. The protagonist is at the centre of everything; they need to be credible and believable, even if they are not plausible in the realm of our own world.

Every action and decision they make must be convincing. As author’s we want the readers to experience events through this main character(s) eyes: joy, fear, exhilaration, disappointment and hopefully success. They have faced challenges and overcome the barriers that were placed in their way by well thought out plots.

Empathy for them, once developed, should lead to pages turned and future books read – especially, in the case of a series.

To achieve this, a writer must know their characters intimately so that everything they do, think, and say will support the developed plot, enhanced by the skilfully written detail of setting – the world that the protagonist and the cast of characters inhabit.

If you think of these characters as real people and develop profiles for each, the protagonist’s profile will be more detailed than minor characters, although they still need to respond and react true to type, therefore, the author must be well versed in the ‘type’ of character they are.

Your profile should cover the basics: physical aspects, appearance, age, height etc.

But then dig deeper: –

What is their emotional state?

What is their unique back-story that led to them being the person (or alien) they are now?

What family/friends/ associates/colleagues do they interact with?
Are any of these toxic?

What goals do they have and what stands in their way?

Nobody is perfect so what flaws do they have?

Are they haunted by the past or motivated by their potential future?

Do they crave love, are they driven by a quest, or seek to save the world?

What are they uniquely good at?

What would make them act out of character?

What are their loves/hates?

Do they have vulnerabilities or insecurities?

Do they have secrets and, if so, what would happen if they were discovered?

How do they change and grow as a result of the events they face throughout the plot?


All these questions will help define the characters so that their reactions, actions, and interactions will flow smoothly and make them live on the page.

Whether they are asked of the protagonist or antagonist, or supporting characters, this is valuable background information that will add depth to your writing when the knowledge is applied to their interactions.
At all costs avoid stereotypes, they will not work and may offend the reader.

When the protagonist first appears make their entrance count. They must appeal, interest, or intrigue your reader so that they continue to follow the story.

What is it about them that captures attention? Is it their appearance, attitude, intelligence, or a unique feature that makes them stand out?
Once the characters have been created then they can be let loose on the pages of your manuscript as the novel takes shape. Structure, plot, and pace are essential, but without believable characters that convince, hook, and delight the reader there will be no life and depth to the story.
Everything they say and do should show the kind of character they are. Props can be used to embellish this process, if they add something to their development and the use of which aids the core plot move forward.
Whatever details the author knows about a character, it will be more than need ever be shared on the page. Exposition – description and ‘info-dumps’ – should be avoided as they slow down the pace of the plot, so only feed information to the reader on a need-to-know basis; instead, use this valuable background knowledge to breathe life into your characters’ thoughts, words, and deeds.

If the characters created feel real to the author, then they will to the readers of the novel, which is the essence of successful and memorable fiction.


Author Valerie Holmes

Valerie’s love of writing and creating stories began in her childhood. Now, as an established author she loves sharing that love by tutoring students in the art of creative writing. Her career to date spans 5 novels, 46 novellas and working as a tutor for the London School of Journalism, Writing Magazine and independently via:

www.ValerieHolmesAuthor.com

Her romantic adventures are mainly set in her beloved home county of North Yorkshire in northeast England. It is an area of majestic moors, rugged coastline, and beautiful market towns of Whitby, Northallerton and Harrogate and historic York. The early nineteenth century (Regency) was a period of huge social inequality and change, smuggling, espionage, and industrial innovations that all served to add drama to many of her romantic adventures.

Valerie’s work has been compared to romantic classics: ‘Wuthering Heights meets Poldark.’ Romance with a darker touch of mystery added.

Recent publications: Betrayal and The Baronet’s Prize now available on Amazon and KindleUnlimited.

When not working Valerie loves to walk in the countryside with her two loyal spaniels, bake, research historic locations, and travel broadly with family and friends.

www.ValerieHolmesAuthor.com (10% discount off fees if you quote this article)

INSTAGRAM | TWITTER | FACEBOOK


No Wasted Ink Writers Links

No Wasted Ink Writers Links


As we come to the final deadline for Nanowrimo, I thought I’d post a few links to writing articles to help inspire you. Keep up the good work and I wish you all success with your Nano projects! Good luck.

9 Things Every Debut Author Learns

How to Make Your Character’s Choices More Difficult

Using Conflict to Build Tension

Fight Scenes: Deep Cover & How to Write the Good Fight

The Importance of Commas, Meter, and Reading Aloud for the Fiction Writer

7 Simple Social Media Tips for Successful Authors

The Half-life of Verbs

How to Use Real People in Your Writing Without Ending Up in Court

Writing my Way Through Trauma

How to Write Faster: 8 Tips to Improve Your Writing Speed