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Generating Science Fiction Stories

Filofax and Notebooks

The act of creativity has been a subject that fascinates me. I have always been a creative woman, I can not stop creating things any more than I can stop breathing. It is a major part of my life and shapes who I am. When the desire to write burst within me in 2010, a single character demanded that I start to write his story. More characters in the story followed and together all these people have become a steampunk science fiction series that I will one day publish. Yet, a single series does not an author make. From time to time, I have been asked to contribute a story to an anthology or a magazine and I found myself frozen, unable to write a word or meet a deadline. I was forced to let these opportunities go without submitting a single word.

Outline The Problem

I became determined to overcome my science fiction writer’s block. While I have published memoir shorts and a regency romance, I consider myself to be a science fiction and fantasy author. I am well versed in the genre having read most of the classics from Robert A. Heinlein, Issac Asimov, and Arthur C. Clarke, to a range of women science fiction authors such as Vonda McIntyre, Andre Norton, and Marion Zimmer Bradley. This has allowed me to become familiar with the genre tropes and style of the “golden age” of the 1950s and 1960s when science fiction gained its footing in popular culture. Yet, how to generate science fiction ideas for myself eluded me.

My first thought to solve the problem was to listen to other authors in the genre and get an idea of how they developed their ideas. I attended convention panels with Vernon Vinge, Todd McCaffery, Greg Benford, David Brin and other famous authors to glean how they came up with material that gained them Hugo and Nebula awards. Over time, I realized that each of these authors had a system to store ideas for themselves related to science fiction. Every author had a different way of obtaining these core ideas. Some had buddies who worked at JPL or NASA, others were scientists themselves with years of training in their chosen field. They attended science conferences or read journals about the world of technology today, took these raw facts and concepts, pushing the ideas into the future and giving it a literary twist.

The Past Through Tomorrow

Being a collector of fountain pens and notebooks, I had read how people in the past had kept journals known as “commonplace books”. This was a compilation of ideas and information that the author thought relevant. It was popular with the thinkers of 15th century England and eventually became a scholarly tool adopted by major universities. I liked the concept of the commonplace book and wondered if I could apply it to my science fiction idea generating problem.

To find the basic facts to form ideas from, I signed up for free science journals on a variety of subjects. I joined science fiction clubs and listened to what concepts intrigued the readers.

My paper notebook failed.

There is such a barrage of information in the journals, many fields are expanding their knowledge at speeds that make it difficult to keep up with, that copying the information by hand became overwhelming. I switched to using Evernote and set up folders where I could cut and paste various science-based articles that I thought might have a possible idea to base a story on. Using this collation method proved to be easier to maintain and slowly, I began to have folders of possible science-based​ concepts to write about.

Sharpening The Tools

Although I was generating facts to draw on, I was still having trouble generating science fiction stories except for my Opus Magnus. An author friend of mine suggested that instead of writing short stories, I should try poetry. The form was short and wouldn’t take up as much time to write. I had also taken an online writing course put out by the University of Iowa where one of the lessons said that to practice scene building, try writing haiku first. Haiku was about describing a single moment in time, which are the building blocks of stories.

This is where my love of Scifaiku was born. The poems are only three lines long and I can do them in batches. I would start with facts from my commonplace folders in Evernote and then apply an emotion, setting and time to them. It worked. I began to assemble science fiction poems and much to my surprise, people seemed to like them.

In September of 2015, one of my online writing communities held a writing challenge. Write one flash fiction story a day for the entire month. If I did the challenge to the end, I would have thirty flash fictions to show for it. I decided to try. I would focus all my creative energy on writing science fiction or fantasy and see where it led me. As it turned out, writing with a group of authors gave me the support I needed to complete the challenge. Not all the stories I wrote are good enough to submit, but a number of them were good enough to either send out as a flash fiction or to expand into a longer and better story in the future.

I have followed up with doing two more challenges in 2016. For the first time, I have a backlog of science fiction and fantasy stories to draw on. What is more, I seem to be able to create new characters and plots without the strain that I used to feel. This practice has sharpened my skillset.

Last Word

Today, short stories and poetry come to me more easily. I have established a method of generating science fiction stories that works for me. As time passes, my files grow richer with more science-based concepts to draw from. I hope that by outlining my creative process this gives you ideas on how to be more creative in your own writing.

No Wasted Ink Writer’s Links

writers-linksI always enjoy sharing my surfing results with you all each and every Monday.  This week I have a couple of good articles about writing, blogging, and revision.  I hope you enjoy them.

My Dad Reads ‘Wuthering Heights’ For The First Time

Hate the Editing Stage of Writing? Check Out These Helpful Tools

Formatting Your Book With Scrivener

WHY INDIE PRESSES ARE OPENING BOOKSTORES

How to Make Conflict the Engine That Drives Your Story

An Experiment in Fostering Creative Flow

Blogging Authors, Ignore the Rules! 9 Tips for a Successful Author Blog

How to Transform Your Story With a Moment of Truth

Tips for Creating Voice in Your Writing

THE SCIENCE OF WRITING

No Wasted Ink Writer’s Links

writers-linksWelcome back to another Monday of Writer’s Links.  This week I have a few general writing articles for you, but also one about a common problem that afflicts women of a certain age that would be interesting fodder for a story.  While the data-mining story is a little technical, I feel it has relevant information for us writers.  I hope you find the articles interesting!

8 Tips for Editing Other Writers’ Work

Are Flashbacks Fizzling Your Fiction? Time as a Literary Device

Going Beyond the Default in Your Worldbuilding

ON THE INVISIBILITY OF MIDDLE-AGED WOMEN

It’s Frustratingly Rare to Find a Novel About Women That’s Not About Love

Resetting Your Creativity

Jaime Lannister and Sympathetic Monsters: A look at a Master

How to Get Book Reviews: 10 Tricks for Getting Your Book Reviewed by a Book Blogger

7 Things Professional Writers Know That Amateurs Don’t

Data Mining Reveals the Six Basic Emotional Arcs of Storytelling

No Wasted Ink Writer’s Links

writers-linksMonday’s are my favorite posting days because I love to share my internet wanderings with you all.  This week features plenty of general writing articles that caught my eye.  Some for beginners and some for more advanced authors.  Enjoy!

How to Plot a Book: Start With the Antagonist

Symbolism & Setting—The Perfect Marriage

Building A Story Garden: The Power Of Settings In Fiction

How To Write 50,000 Words In A Month With Grant Faulkner

Are Libraries the New Bookstores?

Typography Aficionados Still Not Happy With Kindle Fonts

Are you a ‘reader’ when listening to an audiobook? Yes, of course.

Nearly 400 Publishers Have Applied for Medium’s Plan to Help Them Make Money

Alan Moore Advises New Writers to Self-Publish Because Big Publishers Suck

The Hidden Messages of Colonial Handwriting

No Wasted Ink Writer’s Links

writers-linksHappy Fourth of July and welcome to another installment of No Wasted Ink’s writer’s links.  I have a nice selection of writing articles for you all and I hope that they prove to be as much interest to you as they were for me.  Have a safe and sane Independence Day!

Against the Cult of Travel, or What Everyone Gets Wrong About the Hobbit

The Art of Video Game Writing

INSIDE THE WRITING RETREAT

Scrivener: a Great Tool for Professional Bloggers

5 Secrets of Complex Supporting Characters

Are You Botching Your Dialogue?

Making your Character Shine From Page One

Writing Lesbian Fiction With Clare Lydon

What Are You Really Saying? (The Use of Subtext)

A Less Lonely Way to Get More Writing Done