Tag Archives: writers

No Wasted Ink Writer’s Links

Happy Monday! It is time for the latest crop of writer’s links here on No Wasted Ink. Enjoy!




Making Big Adjustments as a WAHM

The Principles of Possessives

Simple Scrivener tip: mark off your scenes

Why Being a Sellout Will Help You Write What You Love

11 Easy and Efficient Ways to Build Knowledge, Self Teach, and Learn Every Day

Writing Better

Wired For Story. Using Brain Science To Hook Readers With Lisa Cron

The writing was – to me – far more important than any ‘career’

For New Writers: Three Tips For Becoming A More Better Writer

Overwhelmed? Too Busy?

Creating the Outline of a Novel: From Notebook to Scrivener

A novel always starts out in the back of my mind as a nebulous zygote. A character or a single scene is the seed from which a beautiful child (novel) will be born. It grows there in my mind without my noticing it until one day it solidifies. I say to myself, “Ah ha! There is a story there to write.” It is time for the birthing process to begin. For some people, this means “pantsing” a rough draft without any thought beyond the original seed. For me, I prefer the outline process to give myself a solid foundation with which to build on.

I like to begin the outline process with pen and paper or in Word on my desktop. The pen and composition books are easier to take with me and give an extra layer of creative play that I’ve come to value. There is something about the feel of paper and a pen in your hand that is comforting. It slows down the process enough to allow you to think the details through. I always use a pen, not a pencil. I do not want to be able to easily erase what I’ve written. This is not a time for editing, but for allowing unhindered expression to come forward. I can not do this on a computer due to my fast typing speed. Lately, I’ve been favoring the notebook method over using Word on the computer to outline.

When starting a notebook, I will put the name of the novel at the top, the year I started working on it, and what volume this notebook is. Sometimes there is only one volume, sometimes there are more. For my first novel, I barely had any notes at all. Most of my ideas were in my head alone. Now I find that there is more value in putting the ideas down on paper as best I can. A novel can stretch out over a few years time in the the writing of it. That is a long time to remember tiny details.

My novel’s beginnings are a scrawl of different things. Mind maps where a central character or scene is at the center and I ask myself “what if” questions and then write down ideas as they come no matter how strange around the central idea. Most of these “what if” scenarios are cast off as illogical or too far fetched. Ideas that I like, I highlight, but otherwise simply leave them in the notebook. I sometimes will write down narratives of scenes that have come to me. I don’t go into details, that will come later with the writing of the novel itself, but I try and capture the essence of what is percolating in my subconscious.

I start doing “interviews” of the main characters as they come to me. It is a method that I learned in a creative writing class last year. I make a note of the character’s physical features and find an actor that he can be loosely based on. I begin to formulate the personalties and emotional and intellectual goals and ideals of each character. I write down phrases that would be common to them alone, gestures and other habits that help make the character his own person.

Since I write science fiction and fantasy novels, I find it helpful to rough out a map of the land I’m writing about. Nothing of great detail, enough so that I know where everything is located and can have a good idea as to how long travel time is between the different locations in the story. If I decide that a map will be useful to the readers later, I either will create a better one myself or hire an artist to draw one for the book.

At this point, I open up a file in Scrivener and start to set up the project. In the research area, I create files for the character sketches, the location descriptions and decide on keywords to represent each character, location and special object. This helps me to track information during the revision phase of writing. I also like to print out this information to fit into my writing filofax journal so that I can take my research information with me when I write outside my home. I consider the Scrivener files to be the master copies and my filofax the copy. When I update the information, I update Scrivener first and then print out a new page for the filofax. I like to use the filofax since I don’t have to worry about electricity or waiting for the information to load up in a computer. What I need is all there organized in my writing journal without distraction of the Internet.

Once the research information is in Scrivener, I start an “outline” file in the research area. I write a short paragraph of each scene of the novel from beginning to end based on the highlighted areas of my mind maps from the notebooks and the short scenes that I’ve already written down on paper. The master outline is one file in the research area of Scrivener and a copy is printed for my filofax writing journal. At this point I’ve closed my paper composition notebooks and am working completely in Scrivener.

The final step, before I begin drafting, is to take each outline paragraph and create a separate file for it in the drafting area. I will give the scene a title, write a short synopsis of it in the scrivener card and then paste the entire description paragraph into the document notes section of the inspector. I also label and put in the status of the newly created file.

Every writer uses a different method to create their novels, this is the way I cobble together mine. I consider Scrivener and my filofax writing journal to be the key elements of the system. Scrivener organizes my research and novel information and the filofax is its backup shadow that comes with me everywhere. Together, they form the backbone of my creative process and help to make writing my novels easier.

No Wasted Ink Writer’s Links

This week’s writer’s links are more focused on the art of writing as apposed to marketing your book or publishing. Enjoy!



Did the Bard speak American?

Once Upon a Time, The lure of the fairy tale.

Really, your outline does not have to be perfect

The significance of plot without conflict

The Invisible People

Style is the rocket

I Love Words

Technology Fail

Keeping Track of Contacts, Media History, and Speaking Engagements

23 Fiction Writing Ideas That Will Revitalize Your Story

Writing Space: Duffy Brown

I connected with Duffy Brown on Twitter and she kindly consented to do a guest post here on No Wasted Ink about her writing space!

Writer Duffy BrownDuffy Brown the writer…

I love anything with a mystery. While others girls dreamed of dating Brad Pitt, I longed to take Sherlock Holmes to the prom. I have two cats, Spooky and Dr. Watson, and conjure up who-done-it stories of my very own for Berkley Prime Crime. Iced Chiffon, out October, 2012, is the first in the Consignment Shop Mystery series. Killer in Crinolines is scheduled May, 2013. In my other life I wrote romance as Dianne Castell and am a USA Today bestselling author.

Duffy Brown's Writing SpaceDuffy’s writing space… aka: The Pit.

I wish I could say that when asked to take a picture of my office for Wendy and No Wasted Ink, she caught me at a bad time. Truth be told when it comes to my office it’s always a bad time. There’s always a map taped to the wall. This time the map is Savannah. There are a lot of one way streets in Savannah, twenty-three squares that are mini parks, as many churches as bars and a ton of incredible Southern restaurants. I need a map to keep it all straight.

Then there’s my love of Sherlock. I’m a Sherlock dork. Have a Sherlock hat in my office for inspiration. Do you see his pipe, a Sherlock action figure (yeah, there really is such a thing)? I even have Sherlok as my license plate and named my cat Dr. Watson.

Then there’s the notes taped to the wall and promo on the floor. I got the cutest pens. They have the chalk outline of a dead guy on top. I have thousands of bookmarks to mail out, notepads, magnets, flyers, posters. At least there aren’t any dirty coffee cups and half-eaten doughnuts. Actually there would never be half-eaten doughnuts in my house anywhere! Doughnuts are one of my five food groups behind ice cream and before diet Coke.

I just gave my office another look-see. Did you see the discarded bra? Lordy, I forgot that was there.

Duffy Brown's Writing ToolMy Favorite Writing Tool is…paper and pencil.

It’s how I plot out a mystery. I get that big sheet of drawing paper you see on the floor, divide out twenty-one squares (one for each chapter) and start plugging in scenes. I do it outside to inside, meaning I know how the book starts and how it ends then plot a middle action, red herrings, clues, suspects, a few more dead bodes. I have a big eraser so I can change things around.

You wonder why I just don’t use sticky notes. Well one time I had the window open and a big breeze came along. I learned my lesson!

Duffy Brown
Berkley Prime Crime
Consignment: Murder series
-Iced Chiffon Oct, ’12
-Killer in Crinolines May ’13
DuffyBrown.com

No Wasted Ink Writer’s Links

This week’s writer’s links are more focused on writing, a little grammar, novels and publishing. Enjoy!



5 Things Paratrooping Can Teach You About Self-Publishing

Formatting Ebook . . . Tearing Hair Out

Why Writers Should Stop Being Scared and Take A Leap of Faith

Repotting Your Creativity

Three Easy Plotting ideas

5 Reasons to Write Your Scenes In Order

Six Things Meditation Taught Me About Freelancing

Surviving the Summer and Social Media

Where to Find Inspiration: 50 Quotes for Writers

Grammar Rules: Subject and Verb Agreement