Tag Archives: writers

No Wasted Ink Writer’s Links

This week I thought that the selections might be a little simpler. So we have easy methods to do technical writing, why you should go and walk in the park (my personal favorite activity) and other more relaxed subjects. Enjoy! Let me know how you like the links.

How To Add Up Your E-Book Sales In A Snap

My #1 Tip For Teen Novelists

Freelance Writers: How do You Hold Yourself Accountable?

Need a Boost? Try a Walk!

2 Simple Ways to Become That Writer With a Million Story Ideas

Technical Writing Made Simple, Stupid

Random House Says Libraries Own Their Ebooks

How to Sell More Books and Boost your Platform by Getting Your Story in the Media

How to Spot Viable Freelance Writing Opportunities on Job Boards

Difficult Voices: First Person Plural

Writing Space: Renee Johnson

I’ve been a regular reader of Renee’s blog Writingfeemail for almost a year and have come to enjoy her observations about life and writing. I am often amazed at some of the similarities writer’s share as they pursue their craft. I hope you’ll enjoy Renee’s guest post here at No Wasted Ink.

Renee Johnson Writer and BloggerReading consumed me as a child and the resulting nickname – Bookworm – stuck to me for many years. I wrote my first novel around the age of nine in pink ink on lined loose paper. But growing up in the late seventies and early eighties, I was advised to follow the trail of business, not passion. Pursuing one’s bliss didn’t come into fashion until I was knee deep in the professional world with a business degree under my belt. Although my creative writing professors always encouraged me to continue with my writing, it was thought to be something one did as a hobby instead of a career.

Then I married, had a child, and followed him around baseball fields until I woke up one morning and realized that he was at college three hours away and I had newly acquired free time.

So, I ran away to France to a little village named Essoyes and the Writing School taught by teacher, editor, and writer – Janet Hulstrand. There, I found the validation and confidence that I needed to pursue writing as a second act in my life.

I returned home and began to put the many things I learned into practice and started the blog: Writingfeemail. But it took a while to get a writing space set up that was comfortable and user friendly. I found that I was constantly looking for things like staplers, post-it notes, paper clips, ink pens, etc. So I found a great divided organizer that matched my writing desk and it has been the single best piece of furniture that I have ever bought. Nothing is further than a fingertip away and the dividers keep it all separated so that I don’t have to dig around to find what I need.

Renee Johnson Writing Room

And the desk is in a room upstairs away from the bustle of normal traffic coming in and out of the house. That way I can get a bit more privacy. The small sofa and love seat are perfect for kicking back and proofreading my work or just offering a bit of a rest after hunching over the keyboard for too long.

Renee Johnson Writing room with sofa

There is a second writing tool that I use, especially when traveling. It is a laptop computer. And I have a brown leather journal that I love to carry around and jot notes in. But lately I’ve found that the notepad application on my blackberry has replaced the handwritten notes and that is probably a shame. Combing over my little notations often sparks the fire again for a project in a way that a typed note in the phone just doesn’t!


To read more about my experiences in Essoyes at the Writing School visit writingfeemail.

No Wasted Ink Writer’s Links

Once again, it is time to visit the web for interesting articles about writing. Although I do write the occasional article myself on the topic, I love the wealth of information that is available from all the millions of writers out there in the ether. I hope you will enjoy this week’s selection.

Of Men and Nicknames

The Alchemy of Story: Initiation, Transformation, Revelation

Should You Self Publish Your Novel?

30 Nautical Expressions

Community and Your Writing Business: It Takes a Village

Use illustrations to distract from your writing

25 Lifestyle Changes Guaranteed to Substantially and Quickly Boost your Creative Productivity

Is LinkedIn Losing Its Identity?

Help! My Book Isn’t Selling. 10 Questions You Need To Answer Honestly If You Want To Sell More Books.

5 Ways to Stay Organized as a Freelancer

Prompts to Promote Creative Writing

Moleskine and Cross Beverly Fountain PenThere is an old adage, “Practice makes perfect”. As an artisan, I create product at my jeweler’s bench a few times every week. I either make simpler production pieces that keep my booth’s jewelry racks filled, or spend more intensive creative time working on complex showcase pieces that are displayed in protective glass cases. I’ve learned that as long as I keep making a few items as I go along, I never come to a point where I am unprepared for a sales venue or unable to offer a few new designs to my customers. Practicing my jewelry craft on a regular basis, attending jewelry making workshops to increase my skills, and studying gemology has all combined to make me a reasonably successful artisan jeweler.

Writing, as it turns out, follows a similar business model. To be a successful writer, you need to write something every day to sharpen your skills. I schedule time to work on my novel a few days each week and consider it as I would the time I put in on complex jewelry items. A long term fiction novel takes more time to dream up, to figure out the connections between the characters, and to create a satisfying experience for the reader. On days when I am not working on my novel, I am writing posts for No Wasted Ink or articles for magazines. I consider these works to be like the simpler jewelry pieces, they are popular with the public, I sell a great many of them, but they don’t take quite as much mental exercise as a complex focal piece. Between these projects and commenting on forums and blogs, I tend to write for a few hours every single day. Writing is like breathing. It is what I do.

If you don’t have a blog to spur you to write on a regular basis, the next best thing is to start a journal and use writing prompts to fire up your creativity and hone your writing skills. Your journal can be on your computer or perhaps in a paper bound book such as a Moleskine. No one needs to see your short exercises, but if you have an inspiring day, that prompt could be the beginning to a good short story, novel or article. Your daily writing habit does not need to be long, perhaps a few hundred words at best. You’ll find that as you write, over time your word count will increase and finding topics or stories to write about will be easier.

The following are online sources for writing prompts.

Creative Writing Ink

The-One-Minute Writer

Short Story Ideas

The Write Prompts

The Journal

No Wasted Ink Writer’s Links

As I slowly get prepared for NaNoWriMo this year, I’m starting to focus more on articles about writing scenes and other nuts and bolts of the organizing of a novel. I especially loved the one about fight scenes, but all of these have interesting information to impart.




Biff! Pow! Fight Scenes!

Get a Grip on Twitter Handles

The Whys and Hows of Paraphrasing

As A Freelance Writer, Should Quality Ever Come Second To Quantity?

Editing Tips

How To Get Amazon’s Top Customer Reviewers To Review Your Book

How Technology Has Changed Stories In My Life

The Business Rusch: Content is King

Articles You Wouldn’t Take Home to Mother: How to Write About Embarrassing Topics

How Bestseller Lists Work…and Introducing the Amazon Monthly 100